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Archive for June, 2009

Interview with writer, vocalist & social activist Maharajah Kumari Binodini Devi…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 30, 2009

Cultural Root Is The Strength To My Literature
Interview with Maharajah Kumari Binodini Devi

An interview by Salam Rajesh*

M K Binodini

M.K. Binodini

 Maharajah Kumari Binodini Devi, born 1922, is a well-known literateur having contributed some of the best literary works in Manipuri. A recipient of Padmashree, M.K.Binodini is the youngest daughter of Maharajah Sir Churachand Singh of Manipur and Maharani Dhanamanjuri Devi. Educated at Shillong and at Santineketan, she is one of the popular writers in the state. She has to her credit several popular literary pieces including short stories, radio plays, lyrics, ballet scripts and filmscripts. Her collection of short stories, titled Nunggairakta Chandramukhi, bagged her the Jamini Sunder Guha Gold Medal. Her historical novel Boro Saheb Ongbi Sanatombi fetched her the Sahitya Akademi Award. She had translated several of Tagore’s songs into Manipuri. She had written four ballet scripts, including Thoibi, Kong Hangoi, Keibid Lamjao andLoktak Eshei for the Jawaharlal Nehru Manipur Dance Academy. She had written filmscript for six Manipuri feature films, includingOlangthagee Wangmadasgo, Imagi Ningthem, Paokhum Ama, Ishanou, Mayophygee Macha and Sanabi. Excepting Paokhum Ama, all the films bagged National Awards. She also wrote the filmscript for three documentary films, including the National Award winning film Orchids of Manipur, the internationally acclaimed filmSangai – Dancing Deer of Manipur, and Laa.

M.K.Binodini spoke to Salam Rajesh on her interests in literature and her experiences in her association with the literary and the celluloid world. The excerpts:

On her formulative years

I don’t remember exactly when I first had the urge to write. For me, writing came to me more by accident than by choice. I never thought I would become a writer. Because, I was more attached to drawing and painting in my earlier days.

I initially started writing when I was in school. I was then 16 or 17 years of age. I started with short stories. My first short story was called Imaton. It is about a relationship between a youngman and his young stepmother. I liked it immensely as a good story. So, I showed it to my teacher, Oja Salam Tombi, who also happened to be my tutor. Contrary to my expectation, he gave me a sound scolding for writing it. He said it was unbecoming of me to write such an immoral adult story. I was so embarrassed by his words. I stopped writing there and then.

On the other hand, my parents did not encouraged me as a writer. The Maharajah (of Manipur) and the Maharani had no time to pay attention to me, as they were busy in the affairs of the state. Besides, writing as an art form was not in vogue then.

When I was in college, I started writing short stories again. I wrote three or four short stories in those days. Then I stopped writing again. I was around 19 or 20 years of age then.

In 1944, after my graduation I went to Santineketan to study painting and sculpture. I was there for about three years. I stopped writing in those days. Completely. My attention was on art, and sculpture was my interest. Then I married and had family. I forgot all about writing.

In 1961-62, there was a nationwide observation of the Tagore Centenary Year Celebration. I was in the committee for the celebrations in the state. I was associated with the group entrusted with Tagore’s celebration, particularly on Rabindra Sangeet. That association rekindled the writer in me.

Soon, I was actively associated with Roop Raag, an association of scholars, writers, poets, musicians and dramatists. Dr.Lakhimai, the lady editor of a journal (it must have been the ‘Naharol‘ a journal of the Manipuri students in Calcutta in those days) asked me to write an article for the journal. I don’t know why, but I just sat down and wrote a short story. That was Nunggairakta Chandramukhi my first short story after a gap of nearly two decades.

Elangbam Nilakanta was the reviewer at that time. He appreciated it saying it carried the flavour of a short story. I was much inspired by it. After the commissioning of the All India Radio in Imphal, I started writing radio plays. Aribam Syam Sharma had once encouraged me to write radio plays. I put ink to paper and out came the featurette,Banshi Marol Chumdaba. It was not well received. After that, I wrote Ashangba Nongjabi. People liked it. From then on, I continued writing radio plays seriously. I felt the medium was very suitable, and so it was with sincere interest that I took to writing radio plays.

In the early 1970s, friends of mine like Syam S harma, Lokendra Arambam and others became involved in films. When the filmMatamgi Manipur was on the anvil (in 1971/72) they invited me to join in. Karam Amumacha (Monomohan), the producer of the film, also happened to be a relative of mine. He asked me to asociate in the film. I was reluctant initially, for it was something hard to believe in those days that a film in Manipuri could be possible at all. But I joined in when the making of the film started in earnest. I took care of the costume for the film. That was how my association with films started. I also wrote the lyric for some of the songs in the film.

On her literature

People say I was in Bengal and was associated with Bengali art & literature, and that these influenced my writing. It is not exactly so. I had the inspiration to write long time back as I had mentioned before, when I was in my teens, and in school. I read works of Saratchandra, Bankim and Madhusudan Dutta even before I was in Santineketan. We were staying in Nabadwip (in Bengal) during the second world war days, and there I read books by these great writers of Bengal. I do feel pfoud in saying that I gained much after reading the works by these master literateurs.

It is hard to say which of the form of writing, either short story, radio play, ballet script or filmscript I would prefer most. It all depends on the occasion of writing, the time and the situation.

When the occasion necessitates me to write a lyric, then I am involved with writing lyrics. The same is true of when I get involved with writing in any of the other forms. In fact, I am presently working on a new radio play. And when an opportunity pops up for me to write a filmscript, then I shall be fully involved with films. That goes on.

Writing in the different forms needs working in different perspectives. Radio plays are without the visual angle; emphasis is naturally on the audio effects. So, I have to think of the characterisation and the sequence of acts minus the visual angle. Detail is given on the sound, music and dialogue.

In writing a filmscript, I have to visualize the entire length of film, as it would take shape finally. In films, dialogue can be cut down and replaced by visual and sound effects. That is more effective than lengthy dialogues. And, I have to involve myself in self-drama to conceive and to visualize the different characters and their roles in the film.

On the characters in her stories

People say me being a woman, I give particular emphasis on the female characters. Which, I disagree. Because, when I write I don’t remember my sex. Say, in the story Sagol Sanabi the focus is on Mangi, a male character. Not Sakhi, the main female character. Even in my short story Nunggairakta Chandramukhi, the focus is on a male character, the one playing the role of a gambler, a ruffian.

I recall an interesting incident regarding the short story Sagol Sanabi. I sent a copy of the story to my son in America. And he showed the story to some American friends. A lady in her early forties read the story and she came to my son to tell him she had fallen in love with Mangi, the main male character in the story. Such was the force of the story. The domineering role of Mangi in the story had emerged to win the American lady’s heart. That proved amply that I had given more thrust on the male character, and not on the female character.

As for myself, I would never write on characters of whom I have no indepth knowledge of or whom I as a writer had not associated in any particular time in my life. To write a documentary on the experiences of life, one need to interact at close quarters with the subject.

On her language and style

People usually have misconceptions of the life in the house of the royal family. Some critics ridiculed me as ‘an orchid that bloom in the luxury of the palace and it was unthinkable for the orchid to have a sense of the earthy issues’. They ridiculed me that I sit on a soft sofa chair and I write from there, without ever coming in contact with the masses. That was a shock to me in those days. But I write more about the common people, and I use their language in my writings.

The monarch in Manipur never stayed aloof from the masses. The relationship between the royal family and the common people was a close, cordial one, unlike that in other former princely states. That was the beauty of the Manipuri tradition.

People came in droves to the palace. Like we say ‘Konung kaba orKonung khanba. There were several domestic hands in and around the palace complex. My own wet nurse (Yokchabi or Sana Mapi) in the palace was a commoner. So, I had actual intimate contact with the people all my life. I saw them, heard them and interacted with them. That interaction proved invaluable to me when I took up writing. For instance, the title of a story, Nangga U-naramdrabadi (if I had not met you). Very simple language. I took it up from what I heard around.

It is a natural trait with me to write in the first person, using ‘I’. When I write in this style, I tend to portray myself as a woman first. So, I write as a female writer, naturally. Whereas, I never try to preconceive any message or moral in my stories. Once, a friend asked me how I write my stories. I said to him I don’t know for certain. I somehow write them when the urge comes.

I struggle, you know, to use very simple language. Because, my range of vocabulary is not vast. It is only now that I am picking up beautiful Manipuri vocabulary, but otherwise I am not very fluent with it. usage is simple. Yes, my stay in Bengal for some years was fruitful for me. The common man, even the rickshawallahs, spoke language in a simple but very literary style. I may have picked that up in my filmscripts.

On her working relationship with the director of film

When working in films, for a good film, a writer has to work very closely with the director of the film. Usually, when I write I always try to work closely with the director of the film. Like, I have been working with Syam Sharma. I have to consult him constantly on the different viewpoints in the film. We have to come to a level of understanding. This understanding make things more fruitful for the film.

M.K. Binodini
M.K. Binodini

As a short story writer, I do the writing by myself, on my own. It’s very personal, not a teamwork. It’s only when it comes to the question of publishing it that I worry about the financial involvement, and I consult people. Otherwise, I normally do not consult with anybody on my stories. But, in films, I need to be in close contact with the director when writing the filmscript. Both Syam and myself were in Santineketan, and perhaps we have a close understanding of one another for this reason. We normally interact closely when working on filmscripts.

It do happen that we sometimes defer on certain points. I even walked out sometimes on some differences. Because, I am not a writer who writes a filmscript and then forgets all about it once it is sold off to a producer. This happens to writers of formula films. For me, I write the story and do the filmscript. Even when that has been done, it is my natural instinct to involve myself in the filmmaking because I am very much concern of my work and how it is going to shape up. Anyway, even if I disagree on certain points, I have to compromise with the director as he may have his own views of projecting things. He may also have technical difficulties because of which certain changes have to be made.

On the cultural inputs in film

The theme of Ishanou was a challenging subject. Syam and myself knocked heads together to conceive the film story. Initially, Syam had proposed to cast a real Maibi in the lead role. I instantly raised an objection as there was no telling what it would end up to. I feared theMaibi would get into a trance while the filming was in progress.

The Maibi institution is something which one finds only in a state like Manipur. Studying this institution and working on it was a great challenge for us. We had more than twenty Maibis to interview. Fortunately for me, I was associated with Maibis during my stay in JNMDA. They were there in the Lai Haraoba function, in the mornings. At the palace, too, I saw Maibis but I was not in close contact with them.

Whereas, in the dance academy, I was closely associated with them and I could study their life-style in depth. When working on the filmscript for Ishanou, there were several beautiful sequences that me and Syam loved to put in the film but we couldn’t for some reason or the other. Money and time factor were the major obstacles.

In the scene when Tampha Maibi comes running from her husband’s place, in my original story I had shown her scampering up a Kiyamgei tree and taking shelter up there. It was dark then. In the film, Syam had made the villagers to hold modem torchlights in seeking her. In my script, the villagers came in a line with Meira (bamboo-lit torches) in their hands. When she saw them, Tampha Maibi teased them with the words, “Keku, Keku“. I am sure Syam loved that sequence. Me, too. But it was not possible to shoot the sequence. Obviously technical difficulties.

So, that was that. Sometimes I had to give in to the director, and sometimes the director had to give in to the circumstances. It went on. But, it is very important that the scriptwriter and the director of the film should work very closely to bring out a good film.

One advantage of my background, of my life in the palace, is that the palace was a seat of culture. There was the Pena Loishang, the Maibi Loishang, the Pala Loishang, Sagolkangjei, Raas – you name it. I saw it all.

In the film Imagi Ningthem, Syam had inserted a beautiful sequence. Dhani had heard of her brother-in-law’s illicit affair with a girl. She was waiting for her sister to return. In that sequence, Syam and I thought if we made the sister to return home after attending the Jalakeli performance at the palace, she would then be in typical Meitei traditional dress. In the film we saw Ekashini returning home beautifully dressed in typical Meitei dress and with a lovely aroma around her. That’s how we try to incorporate the essence of Meitei culture in our films. We attempt it whenever we find the opportunity. It is an essence of our rich cultural heritage, and a dimension of the Manipuri civilization.

Speaking of the film Sanabi, as one knows, Manipur is a land of pony culture. Polo has been played in this land since time immemorial. Our ancient manuscripts speak about it. At the palace, we used to ride horses. We loved horses. Some of us sisters, including myself, knew horses well. My father (Maharajah Sir Churachand) was one of the best polo players then. He encouraged us to learn to ride horses and he had a plan even to teach his daughters to play polo. That background helped a lot when I started working on Sagol Sanabi. It made my writing easier.

Personally, I would not like to comment on other’s works, but in our own films we tried to put in aspects of the Manipuri culture in appropriate situations. Say, for instance, in Imagi Ningthem, We put in a piece of the Jalakeli. But we did not showed the actual performance. We made the actress to appear that she was returning from attending the performance. Her dress and flair said it all. And at the concluding part of the film, Ekashini took the boy to a dance rehearsal. We did not showed an actual performance. Frankly speaking, we have such a rich cultural heritage that we find it extrgmely hard to turn a blind eye to the different aspects of our culture.

What is wrong in bringing out our cultural values and traditions ? We could have had made the boy to sing a pop song or a modern song, seeing the modern trend. But, for us, we felt it was best to dwell into the beauty of our traditions.

As for Ishanou, things were even more complicated. We have such a rich tradition of the Meitei culture that we had a hard time in choosing a few pieces from the vast repertory of the Maibi institution. We did workshop for two gruelling months to know Maibis and their culture under the guidance of Oja Kumar Maibi. Kiranmala was strained to brfeaking point in the workshop. She was transformed into a Maibi and we could see the real Maibi in her.

I attended the workshop right from early morning till evening. I was also transformed and that was why I found it extremely difficult to decide what to leave out. It was so complicated. Syam knew we had put in doses of dance than necessary. But we could not resist it. We had barely an hour of film duration. If that had been two hours, we would probably had put in more.

Actually, I had desired the film Sanabi to be shot in black & white. I had certain concept that particular sequences of the film would be extremely dramatic in silhoutte. Specially the silhoutte of the grey horse against the backdrop of the sky.

On her love of the animals and the environment

Yes, I have a great love for birds, animals and the environment since my childhood. This love influenced me to work on the story on Sangaiand in writing the ballet script Keibul Lamjao. I am also deeply concern of the losing of the Loktak lake. Loktak is not just a lake where people fish and pluck edible vegetables to live.

The Loktak lake is a rich depository of several legendary tales. There is a big tradition, a huge cultural tradition associated with the lake. There has been so many literature on the Loktak, inspired by its beauty and charm, of its legends and folktales. That is why I have tried to write the ballet Loktak Eshei for the Jawaharlal Nehru Dance Academy. Even now, I am much worried.

On the human sufferings

Yes, I am conscious of the human sufferings. I do reflect on it in my writings. Say, in Nangga U-naramdrabadi there is element of human suffering. Specially, I feel like writing on the silent, mute sufferings of the mothers in our state. Their tensions, their anxieties. For me, I feel a literary work cannot be said to be complete without a single note on human sufferings.

On the classics 

As a child, I had the good opportunity to watch classic films. Even today, I love watching classic films. In the context of Manipur, we have classics of our own. Once, Syam and myself talked of working on the Manipuri classics. But, as we went deep into it, we became all the more worried. Say, the epic tale of Khamba and Thoibi. It is so rich and it means so much to the people that we feared we would be committing sacrilege if we made blunders in making film on the epic.

Also, it required intensive research to do it. It was part of our vast civilization. We had not the courage to distemper the delicate fabric of our ancestors’ treasures. Speaking frankly, we are yet to attempt a classic film, but we do dream of making one provided we have the resources and the energy to go through it.

A word of note to the upcoming filmmakers

Speaking in the context of Manipur, we have numerous forms of difficulties in making film. I have been associating in films for the last twenty-five years, since the making of Matamgi Manipur. If I am asked to give my views on the present trends of filmmaking, I would say to the upcoming filmmakers that they need to think more deeper, and they have to interact closely with one another to bring out good films. We have had a film winning the Grand Prix, and several of the Manipuri films had bagged national and international laurels. We have reached that level of standard. So, they (young hopefuls) must strive to excel that and more.

 ___________________________

* This article is originally written and published as part of MFDC 25 year (1972-1997) celebration. This article was webcasted with due courtesy to MFDC (Manipur Film Development Corporation) on June 30 2009.
(Source:  06/2009 – erang.e-pao.org | Write-up | Maharajah Kumari Binodini Devi)

Posted in Culture (news), Education (news), Politics (news) | Leave a Comment »

In Memoriam of Khansahib…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 22, 2009

The memorial service and burial of Ali Akbar Khan was held at Mt. Tamalpais Cemetary (2500 5th Ave, San Rafael, CA 94901), Sunday, June 21st at noon, followed by a gathering at the AACM.

Tribute To Ali Akbar Khan From Pandit Swapan Chaudhuri (@ MySpace)

Ustad Ali Akbar Khan: Tribute By Zakir Hussain (@ MySpace)

Remembering Baba…

Tribute to Swar Samrat Dr. Ali Akbar Khan

Posted in IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

World Music Day 2009 – Fête de la Musique (21 juin 2009)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 21, 2009

The Fête de la Musique, also known as World Music Day, is a music festival taking place on June 21...

Fete-de-la-Musique-21st-June-2009-1

History

The idea was first broached in 1976 by American musician Joel Cohen, then employed by the national French radio station France Musique. Cohen proposed an all-night music celebration at the moment of the summer solstice. The idea was taken up by French Music and Dance director Maurice Fleuret for Minister of Culture Jack Lang in 1981 and first took place in 1982.

Its purpose is to promote music in two ways:

  • Amateur and professional musicians are encouraged to perform in the streets. The slogan Faites de la musique (Make music), a homophone of Fête de la Musique, is used to promote this goal.
  • Many free concerts are organized, making all genres of music accessible to the public. Two of the caveats to being sanctioned by the official Fête de la Musique organization in Paris are that all concerts must be free to the public, and all performers donate their time for free.

Despite there being a large tolerance about the performance of music by the general public of amateurs in public areas after usual hours, the noise restrictions still apply, and can cause some establishments to be forbidden to open and broadcast music out of their doors without prior authorization. So the prefectures of police in France can still forbid them to install any audio hardware in the street.

Locations

The Fête de la Musique began in France and has since spread to many countries:

* Argentina
* Australia (Brisbane)
* Belgium
* Canada
* China
* Colombia
* Costa Rica
* Germany
* Greece
* India
* Iraqi kurdistan (sulaymaniyah city)
* Israel (Jerusalem and Tel-Aviv)
* Jordan
* Lebanon
* Luxembourg
* Malaysia
* Morocco
* Netherlands
* Pakistan
* Philippines
* Romania
* Switzerland
* Sri Lanka
* the United Kingdom (Edinburgh and London)
* the USA (New York City) and
* Venezuela

Download here a PDF with a general brief about Fête de la Musique around the world : all about the international development of this event, its basic principles, mission of the coordination and the communication…

(Source: Wikipedia (ENG) | The French Culture Ministry’s website (ENG))

World Music Day 2009 in India…

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Demise of musical stalwart Ustad Ali Akbar Khan…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 19, 2009

Swara Samrat Maestro Ali Akbar Khan

April 14, 1922 – June 18, 2009

My Father taught me music the way most parents
teach their children to speak. He was 110 years old
when he died, and until that time he played constantly,
sometimes 23 hours a day.

Ali Akbar Khan

(Source: aacm.org/aamp.com) – Our most beloved Khansahib passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family on Thursday evening. Khansahib had been a dialysis patient since 2004, and had been enduring numerous health issues ever since. The great Maestro had continued his music teachings publically at the Ali Akbar College until just weeks ago, and continued to teach music at home until the day he died.

Sarode maestro Ustad Ali Akbar Khan (1988 / Wikipedia)

Sarode maestro Ustad Ali Akbar Khan (1988 / Wikipedia)

The memorial service and burial will be held at Mt. Tamalpais Cemetary (2500 5th Ave, San Rafael, CA 94901), Sunday, June 21st at noon, followed by a gathering at the AACM. Due to the overwhelming amount of phone calls, please send all correspondence via email to inmemoryofaak@gmail.com . (Rec.: All messages will be received and as many as possible will be responded to.)

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to AACM for the Ali Akbar Khan Library.

Press review…

A lovers melody (Rag Zila Kafi)

More AACM videos here (sample clips of Instrumental, Vocal and Tabla).

Posted in Culture (news), IMC OnAir - News, News from India | 4 Comments »

Moderation Script (06/2009): Raags, Ghazals and Goethe… (Raga CDs of the Months)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 15, 2009

+++

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Mumbai: The Handshake Concert (06/21/2009)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 14, 2009

Rolling-stone-Handshake-Concert-Pt-Vishwa-Mohan-Bhatt-Mumbai-2009-1The Handshake Concert – 21st June, 2009
Rattle & Hum Music Society and Rolling Stone

present

THE HANDSHAKE CONCERT
Celebrating WORLD MUSIC DAY

FREE CONCERT!!!

Lineup:

  • Pt. VISHWA MOHAN BHATT, Jaipur – Guest of Honor
  • CULTURAL VIBRANTS, Nagaland
  • HIPNOTRIBE, Mumbai
  • ASIN, Nagaland
  • SOULMATE, Shillong
  • THE TETSEOS, Nagaland
  • EXIMIOUS, Nagaland

Radio Partner: Radio One
Online Partner: Myspace.com, http://www.rattlenhum.com
On Facebook…

Pt. VISHWA MOHAN BHATT, Jaipur – Guest of Honor
800px-Pt_Vishwamohan_Bhatt-WikipediaCreator of the MOHAN VEENA and the winner of the GRAMMY AWARD, Vishwa Mohan has mesmerized the world with his pristine pure, delicate yet fiery music. It is due to Vishwa’s maiden mega effort that he rechristened guitar as MOHAN VEENA, his genius creation and has established it at the top most level in the mainstream of Indian Classical Music scenario, thereby proving the essence of his name VISHWA (meaning the world) and MOHAN (meaning charmer) and indeed , a world charmer he is. Vishwa Mohan has performed extensively in the USA, USSR, Canada, the Great Britain, Germany, Spain, France, Italy, Netherlands, Belgium, Scotland, Switzerland, Denmark, then scaling the Gulf of Dubai, Al-Sharjah, Bahrain, Muscat, Abu Dhabi etc. and throughout India.

CULTURAL VIBRANTS, Nagaland
Cultural Vibrants have been performing traditional Naga music for the past eight years. Their songs speak of love, harvest, war, loneliness and more. All of them are sisters and say that “their father who himself is a renowned folk singer is their inspiration.

HIPNOTRIBE, Mumbai
The band was formed in january 2008 by brothers naresh and paresh kamath who felt they were missing out on the live gig action post bombay black! Having completed one year of existence,hipnotribe wants to push it up a notch now.so, they’ll be starting to record their debut album this month.watch out!!

ASIN, Nagaland
Soprano singer who holds a concert certificate from the Trinity Music College of London in voice with merit. Her vibrant personality, charm and soulful voice makes her audience leave wanting for more.

SOULMATE, Shillong
Inspired by the roots and groove sounds of the Blues,Blues-rock,Soul,Rock ‘n Roll, Funk and R&B,SOULMATE came together in Shillong,in February 2003 playing their first concert at the ‘Roots Festival at the Water Sports Complex in Umiam. Since then the band has performed many concerts all over The Northeast as well as in different parts of India. They have also performed at the International Jazzmandu Festival in Kathmandu for two consecutive years..2004 and 2005. Soulmate has performed over 500 concerts all over the country and abroad. Their second album “Moving On” is out now on Blue Frog Records.

THE TETSEOS, Nagaland
The Tetseo sisters, Azi Tetseo and Mutsevelu Mercy Tetseo have been sharing with the world, the melodious traditional Chakhesang Naga folksongs or Li sung in Chokri dialect. Azi and Mercy are talented and accomplished singers of both traditional Naga folk music and Western music. They are currently working on a new folk fusion album. According to the Northeast Sun, the Tetseo Sisters are the new cultural ambassadors of Nagaland and the Northeast, with their Li breaking barriers and boundaries. Li is louder than strong words and the Tetseo sisters are taking it across frontiers.

EXIMIOUS, Nagaland
Formed in 2005 has earned a big name in the music circle of Nagaland and the North East. Its band members have been judged best drummer, Best Bass guitarist, Best guitarist in Hornbill National Rock Festivals. They thrive on original music and pride themselves as pioneers of progressive rock music in Nagaland.

(Source: 06/11/2009 – RollingStone India @ MySpace | Blog)

Posted in Live around the globe | 1 Comment »

Raga CDs of the months (06/09): Raags, Ghazals and Goethe…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 8, 2009

The word Ghazel originates from the Arabean-Persian word Gazal. Its roots back to the Arabian world of the 6th, 7th century. In Turkish we find this poetry form as Gazel.

Beside in Parsi, the Persian language of the Pashtunes, and in Hindi and Urdu, which is spoken in Pakistan, Ghazals have been established in many other languages as expression and verse form of poetry. Far beyond India, Pakistan and Afghanistan to Anglo-American, Hebrew and German linguistic area inside Ghazals experienced a large interest; in Spanish Federico Garcia Lorca experimented with the Ghazal form.

The traditional Ghazal form has love as a melancholy expression, life and metaphysical questions as literary objects.

In the literature Ghazel pretty often is defined as a form of Indian light classical style within the Indian classical music. IMC OnAir’s show will demonstrate that it behaves differently with this structural form of poetry.

date of broadcasting: 15th June 2009 – 10:00 p.m. (MESTZ)
(repetition: )
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

The Ghazal wins it’s expressiveness by an „impersonal note“, into which the reader respectively listener can interprate the own individual mental state. Ghazals live in their emotional expression by a coding, a symbolic, indirect address and of opposed characters, as for example the separation pain of an unfulfilled love in divine form, on a metaphysical, universal, spiritual level…

The film industry of India and Pakistan contributed substantially to the popularization of the Ghazals. Their variety in the expression of love and emotional state like togetherness, desire, pain of separation, apathy and in the form of sullenness or regret, the priority meaning of the word and gentle nature of the Ghazals found a multiplicity of interpreters in Mumbai, the Bollywood metropolis and in Lollywood, the analogue of Pakistan’s film industry.

Outstanding Ghazal composers of India & Pakistan (Urdu ghazals)…

200px-Hafez,_the_Persian 20060921-rumi_jalal Ghalib
Hafiz or Hafez
(1315-1390)
Muhammad Jalaluddin Rumi
(13th century)
Mirza Assadullah Khan Galib
(1797-1869)
152Daagh-Dehlvi 200px-Iqbal

pic23-Faiz-Ahmed-Faiz

mehdi-hassan
Daag Dehlvi
(1831-1905)
Muhammad Iqbal (1877-1938) Faiz Amed Faiz
(1911-1984)
Mehdi Hassan
(1927)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

J.W. v. Goethe

J.W. v. Goethe

J. W. v. Goethe is considered as a founder of the „world literature“. Beside his work for music, theology and sciences he showed large interest in the Persian and Arabian literature.

By a non-fictional writing style in aphorisms together with Friedrich Schiller as the prominent figures of the Weimar classicism Goethe had a relevant influence onto Germany’s philosophy and far beyond the European borders.

Goethe & Hafiz – „West-Eastern Divan“

Goethe wrote the compilation “West-Eastern Diwan” as one of his late works, between Schiller’s death in the year 1805 up to its dying in March 1832.

The compilation was probably written between 1814 and 1819. It was published in the year 1827 in an extended edition. The West-Eastern Divan covers completely in the sense of its original meaning 12 books (see Gutenberg project).

The „West-Eastern Divan“ may be understood according to its time as an expression of intercultural exchange, a Western-Eastern approach between the Orient (Asia) and Occident. In the second book, the book Hafis (Hafis name) Goethe had concretely taken reference to the Persian poet and Ghazal maestro Hafiz.

Hafiz-Goethe-Denkmal (Weimar)
Hafiz Goethe monument (Weimar)

Goethe had been influenced by Hafiz (or Hafez) for his interest in Persian literature Goethe had been influenced by Hafiz (or Hafez) considerably. Till today the Hafez-Goethe monument in Weimar reminds of this relationship.

Goethe found large acknowledgment for the „West-Eastern Diwan“ in the Middle East and in South Asia. As the answer to Goethe’s Diwan the national poet of Pakistan Muhammad Iqbal published 1924 his work „Payam e Mashriq“ (The Message of the East).

Also companions of Goethe were concerned in similar way with eastern, Arabean or South Asian topics and availed the Ghazal for their poetic arts. The German poet J. M. Friedrich Rückert (05/16/1788-01/31/1866) was translator and professor for Eastern languages and wrote 1839 the „Brahmanische Erzählungen“ (Brahmin narrations). It covers 6 volumes, in which Rückert used extensively the Ghazal as poetry form.

The poet August von Platen (Karl August Georg Maximilian Count of Platen Hallermünde – 10/24/1796-12/05/1835) published 1821 “Die Ghaselen” and 1823 „Die Neuen Ghaselen“.

The philosopher Georg Friedrich Daumer (03/05/1800-12/14/1875) showed with „Hafis“ his exeptional poetic virtuosity published in 1846 in Hamburg, a free interpretation of the songs of famous Persian poets.

Faiz-Ghazal: Aaj bazaar main pa ba jolan chalo
– CD “Faiz Ki Yaad Mein” (2004) | singer: Nayyara Noor

(English translation by poet Anis Zuberi (Toronto, Canada))


aaj bazaar main pa bajolan chalo
Chashm-e-nam, jaan-e-shoreeda kafi nahin
Tohmat-e-ishq-posheeda kafi nahin
aaj bazaar main pa-bajolan chalo
Dast afshan chalo, mast-o-raqsan chalo
Khak bar sar chalo, khoon badaman chalo
Rah takta hai sub shehr-e-janaan chalo
Hakim-e-shehr bhi, majma-e-aam bhi
Teer-e-ilzam bhi, sang-e-dushnam bhi
Subh-e-nashaad bhi, roz-e-naakaam bhi
Unka dum-saaz apnay siwa kaun hai
Shehr-e-janaan main ab baa-sifa kaun hai
Dast-e-qatil kay shayan raha kaun hai
Rakht-e-dil bandh lo, dil figaro chalo
Phir hameen qatl ho aain yaro chalo


let us walk in bazaar in shackles
wet eyes and restless soul is not enough
being charged for nurturing concealed love is not enough
let us walk in bazaar in shackles
let us go with afshan in hand, in trance and dancing
go with dust on head and blood on garb
Go as the city of my beloved is waiting
Citys ruler and crowd of commoners
arrow of false charge, stone of accusation
morning of sorrow, day of failure
who is their friend except me
who is untainted in the city of beloved
who deserve the killers or executioners hand
get ready for the journey of heart, go wounded heart
let me go to be executed

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

Raga CDs des Monats (06/09): Ragas, Ghazals und Goethe…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 8, 2009

Das Wort Ghazel stammt in seinem Ursprung aus dem Arabisch-Perischen, Gazal. Im Türkischen treffen wir auf diese Poesieform als Gazel.

Neben dem Parsi, dem Persischen, in der Sprache der Paschtunen, in Hindi und Urdu, das in Pakistan gesprochen wird, haben sich Ghazals in vielen weiteren Sprachen als Ausdrucks- und Versform der Poesie etablieren können. Weit über Indien, Pakistan und Afghanistan hinaus bis in den anglo-amerikanischen, hebräischen und deutschen Sprachraum hinein erfuhren und erfahren sie ein grosses Interesse; im Spanischen experimentierte Federico Garcia Lorca mit der Ghazal-Form.

Der traditionelle Ghazal hat in einem melancholischen Ausdruck die Liebe, das Leben und methaphysische Fragen zum literarischen Gegenstand. Seine Wurzeln reichen bis in die arabische Welt des 6ten, 7ten Jahrhunderts zurück.

In der Literatur wird mit Ghazel nicht selten eine Form der leichten Klassik innerhalb der indisch klassischen Musik definiert. Unsere Sendung wird zeigen, dass es sich mit dieser Strukturform der Poesie doch ein wenig anders verhält.

Sendetermin: 15. Juni 2009 – 22:00 Uhr (MESTZ)
(Sendewiederholung: )
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Ihre Ausdrucksstärke gewinnen die Ghazals durch eine „unpersönliche Note“, in die der Leser respektive Zuhörer ganz nach seiner individuellen Befindlichkeit hineininterpretieren kann. Ghazals leben in ihrem emotionalen Ausdruck von einer Codierung, einer symbolhaften, indirekten Ansprache, und von dem Gegensätzlichen, wie beispielsweise dem Trennungsschmerz einer unerfüllten Liebe, in göttlicher Form, auf einer metaphysischen, universellen, spirituellen Ebene…

Die Filmindustrie Indiens und Pakistan hat wesentlich zu der Popularisierung der Ghazals beigetragen. Ihre Vielfältigkeit in dem Ausdruck der Liebe und emotionaler Gemütszustände, wie Zweisamkeit, Verlangen, Trennungsschmerz, Teilnahmslosigkeit auch in Form von Politikmüdigkeit oder Reue, die vorrangige Bedeutung des Wortes und die sanfte Natur der Ghazals fanden in Mumbai, der Bollywood-Metropole und in Lollywood, dem Pandong der Filmindustrie Pakistans eine Vielzahl von Interpreten.

Herausragende Ghazal-Komponisten – Indien & Pakistan (Urdu ghazals)…

200px-Hafez,_the_Persian 20060921-rumi_jalal Ghalib
Hafiz o. Hafez
(1315-1390)
Muhammad Jalaluddin Rumi
(13th century)
Mirza Assadullah Khan Galib
(1797-1869)
152Daagh-Dehlvi 200px-Iqbal

pic23-Faiz-Ahmed-Faiz

mehdi-hassan
Daag Dehlvi
(1831-1905)
Muhammad Iqbal (1877-1938) Faiz Amed Faiz
(1911-1984)
Mehdi Hassan
(1927)

Johann Wolfang von Goethe…

J.W. v. Goethe

J.W. v. Goethe

J. W. v. Goethe gilt als Begründer der „Weltliteratur“. Neben seinen Arbeiten für die Musik, Theologie und Wissenschaften zeigte er grosses Interesse für die persische und arabische Literatur.
Mit seinem nicht-fiktionalen in Aphorismen gefassten Schreibstil hatte Goethe mit Friedrich Schiller als führende Figuren des Weimarer Klassizismus massgeblichen Einfluss auf die deutsche Philosophie und weit über die europäischen Grenzen hinaus.

Goethe & Hafiz – „West-östlicher Divan“

Goethe schrieb das Sammelwerk “West-östlicher Diwan” als eines seiner späten Werke, zwischen Schillers Tod im Jahre 1805 bis zu seinem Ableben im März 1832.

Das Sammelwerk wurde wohl zwischen 1814 und 1819 geschrieben. Es ist im Jahre 1827 in einer erweiterten Auflage veröffentlicht worden. Der West-östliche Divan umfasst ganz im Sinne seiner ursprünglichen Wortbedeutung 12 Bücher (s. Gutenberg-Projekt).

Der „West-östliche Divan“ darf entsprechend seiner Zeit als ein Ausdruck eines interkulturellen Austausches, einer westlich-östlichen Annäherung zwischen Orient und Okzident verstanden werden. Im zweiten Buch, dem Buch Hafis (Hafis Namen) hatte Goethe konkret Bezug genommen auf den persischen Dichter und Ghazal Meister Hafiz.

Hafiz-Goethe-Denkmal (Weimar)

Hafiz-Goethe-Denkmal (Weimar)

Goethe selbst wurde von Hafiz (o. Hafez) für sein Interesse an Persischer Literatur massgeblich beeinflusst. Noch heute erinnert das Hafez-Goethe-Denkmal in Weimar an diese Beziehung.

Goethe hat für den West-östlichen Diwan im Mittleren Osten und Südasien grosse Anerkennung gefunden. Als Antwort auf Goethes Diwan veröffentlichte der pakistanische Nationaldichter Muhammad Iqbal 1924 sein Werk „Payam-e-Mashriq“ (The Message of the East).

Auch Weggefährten Goethes befassten sich in ähnlicher Weise mit orientalischen, arabischen oder südasiatischen Themen und bedienten sich des Ghazal für ihre Dichtkunst. Der deutsche Dichter J. M. Friedrich Rückert (16.05.1788-31.01.1866) war Übersetzer und Professor für orientalische Sprachen und schrieb 1839 das Werk „Brahmanische Erzählungen“ (Brahmin Stories). Es umfasst 6 Bände, in denen Rückert extensiv den Ghazal als Poesieform verwendete.
Der Dichter August von Platen (Karl August Georg Maximilian Graf von Platen-Hallermünde – 24.10.1796-05.12.1835) veröffentlichte 1821 die “Ghaselen” und 1823 die „Neuen Ghaselen“.
Der Philosoph Georg Friedrich Daumer (5.3.1800 – 14.12.1875) glänzte mit seiner dichterischen Kunstfertigkeit in dem 1846 in Hamburg veröffentlichten Werk „Hafis“, eine freie Interpretation der Lieder berühmter persischer Dichter.

Faiz-Ghazal: Aaj bazaar main pa ba jolan chalo
– CD “Faiz Ki Yaad Mein” (2004) | singer:
Nayyara Noor

(English translation by poet Anis Zuberi (Toronto, Canada))


aaj bazaar main pa bajolan chalo
Chashm-e-nam, jaan-e-shoreeda kafi nahin
Tohmat-e-ishq-posheeda kafi nahin
aaj bazaar main pa-bajolan chalo
Dast afshan chalo, mast-o-raqsan chalo
Khak bar sar chalo, khoon badaman chalo
Rah takta hai sub shehr-e-janaan chalo
Hakim-e-shehr bhi, majma-e-aam bhi
Teer-e-ilzam bhi, sang-e-dushnam bhi
Subh-e-nashaad bhi, roz-e-naakaam bhi
Unka dum-saaz apnay siwa kaun hai
Shehr-e-janaan main ab baa-sifa kaun hai
Dast-e-qatil kay shayan raha kaun hai
Rakht-e-dil bandh lo, dil figaro chalo
Phir hameen qatl ho aain yaro chalo


let us walk in bazaar in shackles
wet eyes and restless soul is not enough
being charged for nurturing concealed love is not enough
let us walk in bazaar in shackles
let us go with afshan in hand, in trance and dancing
go with dust on head and blood on garb
Go as the city of my beloved is waiting
Citys ruler and crowd of commoners
arrow of false charge, stone of accusation
morning of sorrow, day of failure
who is their friend except me
who is untainted in the city of beloved
who deserve the killers or executioners hand
get ready for the journey of heart, go wounded heart
let me go to be executed

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

Völkerkundemuseum Hamburg: Mantra-Mittsommernacht (21.06.09)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 7, 2009

Stimme, Bewegung, Klang und Stille
– Meditation im Museum

Termin: Sonntag, 21. Juni 2009 (20.00 – 24.00 Uhr)
Eintritt: gegen Spende! – Einlass 19.30 Uhr / Sitzkissen und Decken bitte mitbringen.

Mantra-Mittsommernacht-21062009-1Zum ersten Mal veranstaltet das Museum in der kürzesten Nacht des Jahres (s.g. Mittsommernacht) eine Mantra-Nacht zum Mitmachen und Zuhören.

Im großen Kuppelsaal weben indische und deutsche Musiker einen Klangteppich, der jeden Besucher dazu anregt, die eigene Stimme zum Tönen zu bringen, bei Mantra-Tänzen mitzumachen oder den schwebenden Klängen der Gongs zu lauschen.

Schwerpunkt in dieser Nacht sind Mantras aus Indien. Das Programm gliedert sich in vier Teile:

Dazwischen gibt es Pausen zum Entspannen oder Tee-Trinken. Vorkenntnisse oder besondere religiöse oder spirituelle Überzeugungen sind nicht erforderlich. Die Firma Yogi Tee unterstützt die Veranstaltung mit einem reichhaltigen Angebot an Gewürz- und Kräutertees.

(Quelle: 2009 – Museum für Völkerkundemuseum | Monatsprogramm)

Posted in Live around the globe | Leave a Comment »

 
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