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HAPPY HOLI to all our >17,960 FB group members of “INDIAN CLASSICAL”…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on March 24, 2016

We wish to all >17,960 members of our uniquely FB group “Indian classical” a HAPPY HOLI Fest.
May your life be colourful with Joy, Fun, Happyness, Friendship, Love & MUSIC.

We wish to all >17,960 members of our uniquly FB group "Indian classical" a HAPPY HOLI Fest. May your life be colourful with Joy, Fun, Happyness, Friendship, Love & MUSIC.

Posted in Culture (news), IMC OnAir - News, Live around the globe, Medias, Religion (news) | Leave a Comment »

We remember the 241st birthday of composer Muthuswami Dikshitar

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on March 24, 2016

Saint Tyagaraja, Muthuswamy Dikshitar and Shyama Shastri -The Trinity of Carnatic music.

Saint Tyagaraja, Muthuswamy Dikshitar and Shyama Shastri – The Trinity of Carnatic music.

Muthuswami_DikshitarMuthuswami Dikshitar (March 24, 1775 – October 21, 1835) was a South Indian poet and composer and is one of the Musical Trinity of Carnatic music. His compositions, of which around 500 are commonly known, are noted for their contemplative nature and for capturing the essence of the raga forms through the vainika (veena) style that emphasises gamakas. They are typically in a slower speed (chowka kala). He is also known by his signature name of Guruguha which is also his mudra (can be found in every one of his songs). His compositions are widely sung and played in classical concerts of Carnatic music.

The musical trinity consists of Dikshitar, Tyagaraja (1767–1847), and Syama Sastri (1762–1827) although, unlike theTelugu compositions of the others, his compositions are predominantly in Sanskrit. He also had composed some of his Kritis in Manipravalam(admixture of Tamil and Sanskrit).

Muthuswami Dikshitar (March 24, 1775 – October 21, 1835)

Muthuswami Dikshitar (March 24, 1775 – October 21, 1835)

Muthuswami Dikshitar was born in Tiruvaruar (of Thiruvaruar district in what is now the state of Tamil Nadu) to a Tamil Iyer Brahmin couple Ramaswami Dikshitar(discoverer of Raaga Hamsadhwani) and Subbamma, as the eldest son. According to the account of Subbarama Dikshitar, Muttuswami Dikshitar was born in the manmatha year, in the month of Tamil Panguniunder the asterism Krittikaa. He was named after the temple deity, Muttukumaraswamy; legend has it that he was born after his parents prayed for a child in the Vaitheeswaran Temple. He had two younger brothers Baluswami, Chinnaswami and a sister Balambal.

In keeping with the tradition, Muthuswami learnt the Sanskrit language, Vedas, and other important religious texts. He obtained his preliminary musical education from his father.

While he was still in his teens, his father sent him on a pilgrimage with a wandering monk named Chidambaranatha Yogi to gain musical and philosophical knowledge. Over the course of this pilgrimage, he visited many places in North India and acquired a broad outlook that is reflected in many of his compositions. During their stay in Kashi (Varanasi), his guru Chidambaranatha Yogi, presented Dikshitar with a unique Veena and died shortly thereafter. The samādhi of Chidambaranatha Yogi can still be seen in Sri Chakra Lingeshwar temple at the Hanuman Ghat area in Varanasi.

His music

According to legend, his guru asked Muthuswami to visit Tiruttani (a temple town near Chennai). There, while he was immersed deep in meditation, an old man appeared and asked him to open his mouth. He dropped sugar candy into his mouth and disappeared. As he opened his mouth, he had a vision of the deity Muruga and Dikshitar burst forth into his first composition “Shri Nathadi Guruguho” in the raga Mayamalavagowla.

This song addressed the Lord (and/or the guru) in the first declension in Sanskrit. Dikshitar later composed kritis in all the eight declensions on the Lord. These are mostly with epithets glorifying the guru and have very few references to Lord Muruga or specifically to the deity in the saguna form, as at Thiruthani.

He then went on a pilgrimage visiting and composing at the temples at Kanchi, Tiruvannamalai, Chidambaram, Tirupathi andKalahasthi, before returning to Tiruvarur.

Muthuswami Dikshitar attained mastery over the Veena, and the influence of Veena playing is evident in his compositions, particularly the gamakas. In his kriti Balagopal, he introduces himself as a vaiNika gAyaka, “a player of the veeNA”. He experimented with the violin, and among his disciples, Vadivelu of the Thanjavur Quartet, and his brother Baluswami Dikshitar pioneered the use of violin in Carnatic music, now an integral part of most Carnatic ensembles.

Dikshitar’s prime

On his return to Tiruvaruar, he composed on every deity in the Tiruvarur temple complex including Tyagaraja (an amsham of Lord Shiva), the presiding deity, Nilotpalambal, his consort, and the Goddess Kamalambal an independent deity of high tantric significance in the same temple complex. This is when he composed the famous Kamalamba Navavarna cycle, filled with exemplary sahityas on the deities of the Sri Chakra which proved to be the showcase of his compositions. Thesenavavaranams were in all the eight declensions of the Sanskrit language and are sung as a highlight of Guruguha Jayanti celebrated every year. He continued to display his prowess by composing the Navagraha Kritis in praise of the nine planets. The sahitya of the songs reflect a profound knowledge of the Mantra and Jyotisha sastras. The Nilotpalamba Kritis is another classic set of compositions which revived dying ragas like Narayanagaula, Purvagaula, and Chayagaula

Disciples

Muthuswami Dikshitar was approached by four dance masters from Tanjavur: Sivanandam, Ponnayya, Chinnayya and Vadivelu. They expressed their desire to learn music from him and entreated him to accompany them to Tanjavur. There, Dikshitar imparted to them the 72 mela tradition handed down by Venkata Vaidyanatha Dikshita. The students showed their gratitude by composing a set of nine songs called Navaratna Mala glorifying their guru. These four disciples became what is known as the Tanjore Quartet and are revered as the prime composers of music for Bharatanatyam. Among his students, Ponnayya (Also called Ponnayya Pillai) and Chinnayya (Also called Chinnayya Pillai) also served as court artists of Sri Swati Tirunal of Tiruvananthapuram (Trivandram – Kerala). Sri Ponnayya served as the principal of Annamalai University as well and trained many students in music there.

At a young age, Dikshitar was also exposed to the music of the Western bands at Fort St. George. At a later stage, Dikshitar composed some forty songs to several (mostly western folk) tunes loosely adopted to ragas such as sankarabharaNa. This corpus is now known as nottusvara sAhitya (etym. nottusvara = “notes” swara). The influence of Celtic and Baroque styles in these compositions is quite evident (e.g., Sakthi Sahitha Ganapatim, to the tune of voulez-vous dancerVarashiva Balam). There is an erroneous belief that these were composed at the behest of CP Brown, the Collector of Cuddappah. This is not possible as the two could have never met. Muttuswami Diskhitar had left Madras by 1799. Brown came to Madras only in 1817, learnt Telugu in 1820 and moved over to Cuddappah the same year.

Samadhi

On Deepavali day, in 1835, Dikshithar performed puja as usual and asked his students to sing the song “Meenakshi Me Mudam” in the raga purvikalyani raga.

As his students sang the lines “Meena lochani pasa mochani” he raised his hands and saying “Sive Pahi” and left his mortal coil.

His Samadhi is at Ettayapuram ( Mahakavi Bharathi’s Birth Place), between Koilpatti (14 km) and Tuticorin.

Descendants

Muthuswami Dikshitar died on 21 October 1835. Dikshitar had a daughter but it was the descendants of his brother Baluswami who have preserved his musical legacy, and his compositions have been popularized due to the efforts of people like Subbarama Dikshitar and Ambi Dikshitar.

Baluswami Dikshitar, the sixth descendant in the line, a well-known vainika by his own rights, resided in Trichy and then moved to Chennai in 1957. He died in November 1985. He has two sons and two daughters. The eldest son, Muthuswamy, the seventh descendent in the line, retired as a top executive in the State Bank of India group of banks and then was the managing director and CEO of a private sector bank. The younger son runs his own small-scale industry near Madurai. Both daughters are married and well settled in Chennai.

The Raja Rajeswari, Vallabha Ganapathi, Sree Chakra, Banalingam, Saligramam and other idols, given to Shri Muthuswamy Dikshithar by his guru Chidambaranatha Yogi is in the family with the eldest son Muthuswamy along with the veena (with the upturned Yaali Mukha) with the Sanskrit inscription “Sri Ram” said to have been given to Dikshithar by Goddess Sarasvati, when he bathed in the river Ganges, as indication of his having attained Mantra Siddhi.

The grandson of Dikshitar’s only child – a daughter – was a Shri Venkatarama Iyer who took voluntary retirement in the 1940s from his position as Superintendent in the Secretariat of the then Madras State Govt to devote full time attention to his coconut plantation in what is now known as Seetamma Colony of Alwarpet in Madras (official new name is Chennai). The descendants of Shri Venkatarama Iyer are scattered all over the world, a feature if not typical, at least far from uncommon among Iyer families in the 21st century. His great grandson lives in Seetamma Colony with his mother and family, and other great grand children and their descendants live in Madras, Bangalore, Australia, the United Kingdom, Dubai, Doha, Canada and the United States.

Music compositions

His total compositions are about 450 to 500, most of which are very widely sung by musicians today in Carnatic music concerts. Most of his compositions are in Sanskrit and in the Krithi form, i.e., poetry set to music. Muthuswami Dikshitar traveled to many holy shrines throughout his life, and composed krithis on the deities and temples he visited. Dikshitar is considered to have composed on the widest range of deities for any composer.

Each of his compositions is unique and brilliantly crafted. The compositions are known for the depth and soulfulness of the melody — his visions of some of the ragas are still the final word on their structure. His Sanskrit lyrics are in praise of the temple deity, but Muthuswami introduces the Advaita thought seamlessly into his songs, resolving the inherent relationship between Advaita philosophy and polytheistic worship. His songs also contain much information about the history of the temple, and its background, thus preserving many customs followed in these old shrines.

Muttuswami also undertook the project of composing in all the 72 Melakartha ragas, (in his Asampurna Mela scheme) thereby providing a musical example for many rare and lost ragas. Also, he was the pioneer in composing samashti charanam krithis (songs in which the main stanza or pallavi is followed by only one stanza, unlike the conventional two). Dikshitar was a master of tala and is the only composer to have kritis in all the seven basic talas of the Carnatic scheme. Dikshitar shows his skill in Sanskrit by composing in all the eight declensions.

For richness of raga bhava, sublimity of their philosophic contents and for the grandeur of the sahitya, the songs of Dikshitar stand unsurpassed.

Muthuswami Dikshitar composed many kritis in groups. The List of compositions by Muthuswami Dikshitar describes those groups and compositions that belong to each group. Vatapi Ganapatim is regarded his best-known work.

Muthuswami Dikshitar composed one song (Shri Kantimatim Shankara Yuvatim Shri Guruguhajananim Vandeham.. Samashti Charanam Hrîmkâra Bîjâkâra vadanâm Hiranya manimaya Shôbhâ Sadanâm) on the Nellaiappar Temple goddess Kanthimathi Amman.This song is considered to be a rare song set in the rare raga.

He is also said to have composed a Rama Ashtapathi along with Upanishad Brahmendral at Kanchipuram. Unfortunately, this work has been lost.

(Source: 03/2016 – Wikipedia.org)

Compositions of Muthuswamy Dikshitars
sung by Dr. M. Balamuralikrishn

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7th-13th November 2015: Diwali (Deepavali)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on November 11, 2015

2015 Diwali Calendar, Deepavali Calendar

Diwali which is also known as Deepawali is the most famous festival of the year. Diwali is the five days festivity period which begins on Dhanteras and ends on Bhaiya Dooj. However, in Maharashtra Diwali festivities begin one day earlier on Govatsa Dwadashi while in Gujarat Diwali festivities begin two days earlier on Agyaras and culminates on Labh Panchami.

7th November (Saturday):

Ekadashi
Govatsa Dwadashi
Vasu Baras
Panchang for Govatsa Dwadashi Day.

8th November (Sunday):

9th November (Monday):

10th November (Tuesday):

11th November (Wednesday):

12th November (Thursday):

13th November (Thursday):
Raja Ravi Varma's Lakshmi (wikipedia.org)

Raja Ravi Varma’s Lakshmi (wikipedia.org)

During five days festivity various rituals are followed and with Goddess Lakshmi several other Gods and Goddesses are worshipped. However Goddess Lakshmi is the most significant deity during Diwali Puja. The new moon day, which is known as Amavasya, is the most significant day of five days Diwali festivities and known as Lakshmi Puja, Lakshmi-Ganesh Puja and Diwali Puja.

Diwali Puja is done not only in families but also in offices. Diwali Puja is the significant day for the most traditional Hindu businessmen. On this day, ink bottle, pens and new account books are worshipped. Ink bottle and pen, which are called Davat (दावात) and Lekhani (लेखनी) respectively, are sanctified by worshipping Goddess Maha Kali on them. New account books, which are called Bahi-Khate (बही-खाते), are sanctified by worshipping Goddess Saraswati on them.

The most auspicious time to do Diwali Puja is after sunset. The time period after sunset is known as Pradosh. The day of Diwali Puja is decided when Amavasya Tithi prevails during Pradosh. Hence no other Diwali Puja Muhurat is as good as Puja Muhurat during Pradosh even if it is available for one Ghati approximately 24 minutes (Source: 11/2015: Drikpanchang)

Review 2014…

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India celebrates Diwali…. the Festival of Light (with beginning on 11th November 2015) …

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on November 11, 2015

What is Diwali ? – In India, Diwali is one of the most significant festivals. Diwali is the Festival of Lights.
It’s a fiveday celebration that includes good food, fireworks, colored sand, and special candles and lamps.

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HAPPY & BLESSED DIWALI to all our fans of Indian Classical Music !

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on November 11, 2015

happy-diwali-hd-wallpapers-for-desktop

We wish all our fans & music lovers of Indian Classical music, their families + friends
a HAPPY & BLESSED DIWALI 2015 ! – May we look beautiful new music ahead 🙂 

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HAPPY HOLI to all our >15790 FB group members of “INDIAN CLASSICAL”…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on March 6, 2015

We wish to all >15,790 members of our uniquly FB group “Indian classical” a HAPPY HOLI Fest.
May your life be colourful with Joy, Fun, Happyness, Friendship, Love & MUSIC.
FB-Group-Indian-Classicas-15790-members-Happy-Holy-2015-with-Logo_959-304

 

Posted in Culture (news), IMC OnAir - News, Live around the globe, Medias, Religion (news) | Leave a Comment »

Happy Holi Fest on 6th March 2015 to all our Indian friends around the globe…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on March 6, 2015

We wish our Indian friends around the globe and listeners a HAPPY HOLI 2015!
May your life be colorful with Joy, Fun, Happiness, Friendship and Love.
Happy-Holi-Wallpaper-2015

Holi (English pronunciation: /ˈhl/) (Sanskrit: होली) is a spring festival also known as the festival of colours or the festival of love. It is an ancient Hindu religious festival which has become popular with non-Hindus in many parts of South Asia, as well as people of other communities outside Asia.

It is primarily observed in India, Nepal, and other regions of the world with significant populations of Hindus or people of Indian origin. The festival has, in recent times, spread to parts of Europe and North America as a spring celebration of love, frolic, and colours.

Holi celebrations start with a Holika bonfire on the night before Holi where people gather, sing and dance. The next morning is a free-for-all carnival of colours, where participants play, chase and colour each other with dry powder and coloured water, with some carrying water guns and coloured water-filled balloons for their water fight. Anyone and everyone is fair game, friend or stranger, rich or poor, man or woman, children and elders. The frolic and fight with colours occurs in the open streets, open parks, outside temples and buildings. Groups carry drums and musical instruments, go from place to place, sing and dance. People visit family, friends and foes to throw colours on each other, laugh and chit-chat, then share Holi delicacies, food and drinks. Some drinks are intoxicating. For example, Bhang, an intoxicating ingredient made from cannabis leaves, is mixed into drinks and sweets and consumed by many. In the evening, after sobering up, people dress up, visit friends and family.

Holi is celebrated at the approach of vernal equinox, on the Phalguna Purnima (Full Moon). The festival date varies every year, per the Hindu calendar, and typically comes in March, sometimes February in the Gregorian Calendar. The festival signifies the victory of good over evil, the arrival of spring, end of winter, and for many a festive day to meet others, play and laugh, forget and forgive, and repair ruptured relationships. (Source: Wikipedia.org)

Related Articles…

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Vasant Panchami Muhurta – SARASWATI Puja 2015 (24th Jan)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 24, 2015

Saraswati Puja on Vasant Panchami 2015..

Vasant Panchami day is dedicated to Saraswati, the Goddess of knowledge, music, arts, science and technology. Goddess Saraswati is worshipped on Vasant Panchami day. Vasant Panchami is also known as Shri Panchami and Saraswati Panchami. (Source: drikpanchang.com)

Panchami Tithi Begins = 00:45 on 24/Jan/2015
Panchami Tithi Ends = 22:05 on 24/Jan/2015 

Saraswati Puja is undoubtedly the most popular festival in the eastern region. Saraswati is the goddess of learning, arts and crafts. According to her different specialities she is known by different names like Bakdevi, Biraj, Sarada, Brahmi, Satarupa, Mahasweta, Sarbasukia, Prithudar, Bagiswari and, ofcourse, Saraswati.
This festival is held in the month of Magh (January-February). It is a festival celebrated by the youth, particularly students who invoke the blessings of the goddess for success in learning, arts and crafts. Throughout Bengal Saraswati Puja is celebrated in schools, colleges, clubs as well as homes.

Godess Saraswati playing the Veena (Lute)

Godess Saraswati playing the Veena (Lute)

Among all the Hindu deities, Saraswati stands out as the most controversial. Her origin is shrouded in mystery. Starting from the Vedas, Puranas, Upanishads to the popular ancient mythology, Saraswati appears through a veil of mystery.

According to the Matsya Purana, Saraswati evolved from the mouth of Brahma. Such was her beauty and grace that Brahma pursued her. As she fled in different directions a head appeared and so Brahma is attributed with five heads, she was the most unique creation of Brahma. Saraswati is our equivalent of the classical Goddess Minerva and also the Teutonic Goddess Fira. The moon and the lotus associated with Saraswati are both symbols of eternal womanhood.

Some of the many mythological stories connected with Saraswati have interesting sociological interpretations. The gods and the demons by mutual agreement decided to churn the ocean for the Arnrit or the elixir of life. Mainak mountain was used as the churning rod and Basuki as the churning rope. when Lakshmi appeared with the Arnrit kunbha both wanted the elixir. Saraswati with her exquisite beauty lured away the asuras. As the Gods were drinking the Arnrit, Rahu and Ketu, two asuras saw them and slipped in with the Gods. As they drank the Arnrit which would make them immortal like the gods, Vishnu detected them. He immediately cut off their heads. The two enraged asuras, swallowed the sun and moon but could not retain them as their throats were cut. This led to the origin of the solar and lunar eclipse. Saraswati, who was instrumental in helping the Gods to be immortal, was established in the heavens as the Goddess Saraswati.

The Gods and the Gandharvas both wanted the Soma Ras. It was again Saraswati who with her beauty and grace lured and so exhausted the Gandharvas that they could not acquire the Soma Ras which naturally went to the gods.

The Aryans fought with the non-Aryan Comi tribes (tribal dominance among the Aryans) like Nished, Sabar and Pulindar on the banks of the river Saraswati. At the request of Vishnu, Saraswati disappeared underground and again reappeared in far off Rajasthan. The tribals were thus deprived of the life-saving water. They were forced to abandon the area. In both cases we see the importance of the river Saraswati in Aryan life and how Saraswati was used to deprive the weak of water, without which life is impossible. Saraswati is known as Prithudhar (subjugator of the Aryans).

Vashishtha and Vishwamitra, the two sages, were both violently opposed to each other. Vishwamitra ordered the river Saraswati to wash away Vashishtha along with all he possessed. Saraswati refused to comply with his command. To punish Saraswati, he turned the water of the river into blood. At the behest of Shiva, the two sages became amicable and once again there was pure water in the river Saraswati.

In some areas she is believed to be the daughter of the Sun or Surya Kanya. In Western India, Saraswati is seen with the lion or peacock. She is married to Kartikeya. This is really the sun cult.

In Eastern India, particularly Bengal, Saraswati has been absorbed into the Bengali culture. She has been given the mantle of daughter of Parvati and is treated as a daughter. Vishnu had three wives-Saraswati, Ganga and Lakshmi. He was tired of Saraswati because of her superior knowledge and to gave her away to Brahma. Ganga was too frivolous and so was given to Shiva. Lakshmi quiet and sedate, remained his wife. These were the three Sris.

History tells us that the Aryans came to India through the. Khyber pass and settled in Punjab, Haryana and North Rajasthan. Saraswati is one of the seven holy rivers flowing through modern Punjab, Haryana and North Rajasthan.

In the North West along the banks of the river Saraswati. They were a pastoral people and the river was their means of communication as well as source of life.

Hence Saraswati was highly venerated and is associated with the fertility cult.

The mythological background of Saraswati shows the importance of the river Saraswati in the life of the Aryans settled along her river banks. Sociologically the River Saraswati was an important factor in ancient civilization. She is therefore a part of the fertility cult.

The Aryans who lived along the banks of the river were pastoral and rural.

All early development took place on the river bank. Consequently Saraswati came to be venerated as a symbol of knowledge.

It is evident that the upper strata of society used their superior knowledge and expertise to deprive the ignorant lower half of society.

The other name of Saraswati is Prithudhara. It has an important sociological aspect. The Comi tribes were subdued by being deprived of the most essential requirement, water. This story influenced Tagore to write Muktadhara (a play) where Bibhuti the engineer uses his superior knowledge to deprive the ignorant farmers by constructing a dam to divert the river water and satisfy the king.

The story of Kalidas has been built around Saraswati. There was a proud and learned princess who rejected all suitors who could not match her knowledge. The pundits in anger planned to marry her off to a fool. They saw a man cutting the branch on which he was sitting and decided he was the ideal fool for the princess. Kalidas was presented to the princess as a man of wisdom who only spoke in signs. The pundits answered all the princess’s questions by interpreting Kalidas’s signs. The two were married but on the wedding night the princess realized she had been duped. She kicked Kalidas out of her bed. He in sorrow and shame went to commit suicide. The Goddess Saraswati appeared and asked him to take a dip in the river. As he emerged from the river Kalidas was transformed. He began to recite verses in praise of the Goddess. Unfortunately for him he began to praise her beauty not from her feet upwards but from her breasts downwards. Saraswati in anger cursed Kalidas for his audacity. He would die in an ignonimous place.

This festival is celebrated all over Bengal with great fervour and gaiety.

(Source: 01/2015 – Mantraonnet.com)

Saraswati Vandana

Saraswati Ya Kundendu is the most famous Stuti dedicated to Goddess Saraswati and part of the famous Saraswati Stotram. It is recited during Saraswati Puja on the eve of Vasant Panchami.

या कुन्देन्दुतुषारहारधवला या शुभ्रवस्त्रावृता
या वीणावरदण्डमण्डितकरा या श्वेतपद्मासना।
या ब्रह्माच्युत शंकरप्रभृतिभिर्देवैः सदा वन्दिता
सा मां पातु सरस्वती भगवती निःशेषजाड्यापहा॥शुक्लां ब्रह्मविचार सार परमामाद्यां जगद्व्यापिनीं
वीणा-पुस्तक-धारिणीमभयदां जाड्यान्धकारापहाम्‌।
हस्ते स्फटिकमालिकां विदधतीं पद्मासने संस्थिताम्‌
वन्दे तां परमेश्वरीं भगवतीं बुद्धिप्रदां शारदाम्‌॥२॥

Saraswati Ashtottara Shat Nama Stotra

(These verses narrate some of the sacred names of Goddess Saraswati as composed and sung by Sage Agastya. Meaning of the 108 names see on the blog site “For The Divine Power and Soul“):

Saraswati Mahabhadra, Mahamaya Varaprada ;
Saraswati Mahabhadra, Mahamaya Varaprada ;
Shriprada Padmanilaya, Padmakshi Padmavaktraga
Shivanuja Pustakadhrit, Naana mudra Ramapara
Kaamarupa Mahavidya, Mahapataka Nashini
Mahashraya Malini cha, Mahabhoga Mahabhuja
Mahabhaga Mahosaha, Divyanga Survandita ;
Mahakhali Mahapasha, Mahakara Mahankusha
Sitacha Vimala Vishwa, Vidyunmala cha vaishnavi
Chandrika Chandra Vadana, Chandralekha Vibhushita,
Savitri Surasa Devi, Divya-Lankaarbhushita
Vaagdevi Vasudha Thivra, Mahabhadra Mahabala
Bhogada Bharti Bhama, Govinda Gomati Shiva
Jatila Vindhyavasa Cha, Vindyachal Virajita
Chandika Vaishnavi Brahmi, Brahmagyane Kasadhana
Saudhamini Sudhamurti, Subhadra Surpujita,
Suvasini Sunasa cha, Vinidra Padmalochana
Vidyarupa Vishalakshi, Brahma jaya Mahabala
Treyimurti Trikaalagnya
Triguna shastra rupini Shumbrasura Pramathini.

Shubrada Cha Sarvaatmika, Raktabija Nihantiri cha
Chamunda chandika Tatha
Mund Kaaya Praharna, Dhumralochna-Mardana
Sarvadeva-s-Stuta, Saumya Surasura Namaskrita
Kaalratri Kaladhara, Roopa Saubhagya-daayini
Vaagdevi Cha Vararoha, Varahi Varijasana.

Chitrambara Chitragandha, Chitramalya Vibhushita
Kaanta Kaamprada Vandya, Vidyadhara supujita
Shvetamana Neelabhuja, Chaturvarga Phalaprada.

Chaturamana Samarajya, Raktamadhya Niranjana.

Hamsaasna Neeljangha, Brahma Vishnu Shivatmika
Aivum Saraswati Devya, Namnam Ashtottara Shastam
Iti Shri Saraswati shatanama Stotram Sampoornam

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Merry Xmas to all our listeners and musical friends !

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on December 23, 2014

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We wish our listeners, musical friends, artists, music directors, composers,
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19-26 Oct 2014: Diwali (Deepavali)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on October 19, 2014

2014 Diwali Calendar, Deepavali Calendar

Diwali which is also known as Deepawali is the most famous festival of the year. Diwali is the five days festivity period which begins on Dhanteras and ends on Bhaiya Dooj. However, in Maharashtra Diwali festivities begin one day earlier on Govatsa Dwadashi while in Gujarat Diwali festivities begin two days earlier on Agyaras and culminates on Labh Panchami.

19th October (Sunday):

Ekadashi
Govatsa Dwadashi
Vasu Baras
Panchang for Govatsa Dwadashi Day
.

21st October (Tuesday):

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22nd October (Wednesday):

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23rd October (Thursday):

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24th October (Friday):

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25th October (Saturday):

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Raja Ravi Varma's Lakshmi (wikipedia.org)

Raja Ravi Varma’s Lakshmi (wikipedia.org)

During five days festivity various rituals are followed and with Goddess Lakshmi several other Gods and Goddesses are worshipped. However Goddess Lakshmi is the most significant deity during Diwali Puja. The new moon day, which is known as Amavasya, is the most significant day of five days Diwali festivities and known as Lakshmi Puja, Lakshmi-Ganesh Puja and Diwali Puja.

Diwali Puja is done not only in families but also in offices. Diwali Puja is the significant day for the most traditional Hindu businessmen. On this day, ink bottle, pens and new account books are worshipped. Ink bottle and pen, which are called Davat (दावात) and Lekhani (लेखनी) respectively, are sanctified by worshipping Goddess Maha Kali on them. New account books, which are called Bahi-Khate (बही-खाते), are sanctified by worshipping Goddess Saraswati on them.

The most auspicious time to do Diwali Puja is after sunset. The time period after sunset is known as Pradosh. The day of Diwali Puja is decided when Amavasya Tithi prevails during Pradosh. Hence no other Diwali Puja Muhurat is as good as Puja Muhurat during Pradosh even if it is available for one Ghati approximately 24 minutes (Source: 10/2014: Drikpanchang)

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