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Archive for March 21st, 2016

special feature: From India to Europe… FestivalReport (part 1 and 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on March 21, 2016

Part 1 and 2 of FestivalReport2007 is presented under the topic „Alternation of Generations ? – Music conferences & competitions of procreation“. In part 1 „IMC OnAir“ lights up the current music scene in India. Part 2 gives a view of the new generation competitions and international festival scene…

d a t e s   o f   b r o a d c a s t i n g

part 1 and 2Monday, 21st March 2016 – 04:00-05:58 pm CET @ TIDE Radio
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IMC OnAir presents the two hours special show „From India to Europe – Festival Report 2007“. The programme attaches to the Festival Report 2006. Here some interesting and worth knowing details were introduced to history and the development of Indian music festivals, the so called Sangita Sammelana-s.

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All broadcastings of the past you get access to by free PodCast for re-listening as MP3 independently from time and place (see Podcasting | News)…

The Sangita Sammelana-s enjoy internationally an increasing popularity. The origin hands back to the 18th century. Until today the Indian classical music of North and South India can retain it’s character as chamber music on the large stages in Kolkatta, New Dehli, Mumbai, Pune and Chennai.

music:
Raga Jog, Raga Mishra Mand, Raga Tilak Kamod (old form: Kambodi or Kamodi), Raga Sohini, Raga Hamsadwani, Raga Mishra Khamaj, Thumri, Raga Bageshri, Rag Bhairavi, Dhrupad, Pakhawaj Solo (Paran), Thumri (Light Indian Classical Music), Misra Pilu – Jiya Mora Na Lage

artists:
Begum Parveen Sultana (Vocals), Rajan & Sajan Mishra (vocal brothers), Taalyogi Suresh Talwalkar (Tabla), Dr. Kamala Shankar (Shankar Guitar) & Rajeev Janardan (Sitar), Subhra Guha (Vocals), Hariprasad Chaurasia (Bansuri / Flute), Kumar Bose (Tabla), Shahid Parvez (Sitar / Tabla / Vocals), Shashank Subramanium (Bansuri / Flute), Sandeep Das (Tabla), Suchismita & Debopriya Chatterjee (Flute Sisters), Sukhvinder Singh (Tabla), Patri Satish Kumar (Mridangam), Bahauddin Dagar (Dhrupad / Rudra Veena), Ravishankar Upadhyay (Pakhawaj), Ikram Khan (Sarangi), Shishirchandra Bhatt (Harmonium), Kaushiki Chakrabarty (Vocals)

festivals:
Savai Gandharva Music Festival (Pune), 13th ITC Sangeet Sammelan (Bangelore), MRI Music & Dance Festival 2005 / Annual Music & Drama Festival 2006 (Chennai), Saptak Festival (Ahmedabad, Gujarat), Darbar South Asian Music Festival (U.K.)

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special feature: From India to Europe… FestivalReport (Teil 1 und 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on March 21, 2016

IMC präsentiert … From India to Europe… FestivalReport (Teil 1 u. 2)
– Generationenwechsel ? – Musikkonferenzen & Nachwuchswettbewerbe

IMC OnAir praesentiert das 2-stuendige special „From India to Europe – Festivalreport 2007“. Es schliesst an den Festivalreport 2006 an. Hier wurde bereits einiges Interessantes und Wissenswertes zur Geschichte und Entwickung der indischen Musikfestivals, der Sangita Sammelana-s vorgestellt.

Teil 1 u. 2 von FestivalReport 2007 stehen unter der Themenueberschrift “Generationenwechsel ? – Musikkonferenzen & Nachwuchswettbewerbe”. Im Teil 1 beleuchtet IMC OnAir die aktuelle Musikszene in Indien. Teil 2 gibt einen Blick auf die Nachwuchswettbewerbe und internationale Festivalszene.

S e n d e t e r m i n e …

Teil 1 und 2:  Montag, 21. März 2016 – 22:00-23:58 Uhr CET@ TIDE Radio (DE) 
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Alle zurueckliegenden Sendungen finden Sie auch als kostenlosen PodCast zum Nachhoeren (siehe Archiv).

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Die indischen Musikfestivals erfreuen sich international einer wachsenden Beliebtheit. Der Ursprung der Sangita Sammelana-s, reicht bis ins 18. Jahrhundert zurueck. Den Charakter als Kammermusik hat sich die indisch klassische Musik Nord- und Suedindiens auf den grossen Buehnen in Kolkatta, Neu-Dehli, Mumbai, Pune und Chennai bis heute bewahren koennen.

 

Musik:
Raga Jog, Raga Mishra Mand, Raga Tilak Kamod (old form: Kambodi or Kamodi), Raga Sohini, Raga Hamsadwani, Raga Mishra Khamaj, Thumri, Raga Bageshri, Rag Bhairavi, Dhrupad, Pakhawaj Solo (Paran), Thumri (Light Indian Classical Music), Misra Pilu – Jiya Mora Na Lage

Künstler:
Begum Parveen Sultana (Vocals), Rajan & Sajan Mishra (vocal brothers), Taalyogi Suresh Talwalkar (Tabla), Dr. Kamala Shankar (Shankar Guitar) & Rajeev Janardan (Sitar), Subhra Guha (Vocals), Hariprasad Chaurasia (Bansuri / Flute), Kumar Bose (Tabla), Shahid Parvez (Sitar / Tabla / Vocals), Shashank Subramanium (Bansuri / Flute), Sandeep Das (Tabla), Suchismita & Debopriya Chatterjee (Flute Sisters), Sukhvinder Singh (Tabla), Patri Satish Kumar (Mridangam), Bahauddin Dagar (Dhrupad / Rudra Veena), Ravishankar Upadhyay (Pakhawaj), Ikram Khan (Sarangi), Shishirchandra Bhatt (Harmonium), Kaushiki Chakrabarty (Vocals)

Festivals:
Savai Gandharva Music Festival (Pune), 13th ITC Sangeet Sammelan (Bangelore), MRI Music & Dance Festival 2005 / Annual Music & Drama Festival 2006 (Chennai), Saptak Festival (Ahmedabad, Gujarat), Darbar South Asian Music Festival (U.K.)

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The world celebrates 100th birthday of Shehnai legend Ustd. Bismillah Khan (21 March 1916 – 21 Aug 2006)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on March 21, 2016

Bismillah Khan (Urdu: استاد بسم اللہ خان صاحب‎; 21 March 1916 – 21 August 2006), often referred to by the honorific title Ustad, was an Indian musician credited with popularizing the shehnai, a subcontinental wind instrument of the oboe class. While the shehnai had long held importance as a folk instrument played primarily during traditional ceremonies, Khan is credited with elevating its status and bringing it to the concert stage.

He was awarded India’s highest civilian honour, the Bharat Ratna, in 2001, becoming the Third classical musician after M. S. Subbulakshmi and Ravi Shankar to be accorded this distinction.

Early life

Bismillah Khan was born on 21 March 1916 in Dumraon, Bihar in northern India. He was the second son of Bachaie Khan and Mitthan. His parents had initially named him Amiruddin, to rhyme with their first-born son Shamshuddin. However, his grandfather, Rasool Bux Khan, the shehnai master of the court of Bhojpur, exclaimed “Bismillah!” (“In the name of Allah!”) at the sight of him and thereafter he came to be known by this name.

His ancestors were court musicians and used to play in Naqqar khana in the princely states of Bhojpur, now in Bihar. His father was a shehnai player in the court of Maharaja Keshav Prasad Singh of Dumraon Estate, Bihar.

At the age of six, he moved to Varanasi. He received his training under his uncle, the late Ali Baksh ‘Vilayatu’, a shehnai player attached to Varanasi‘s Vishwanath Temple

Bihar Government has proposed setting up of a museum, a town hall-cum-library and installation of a life-size statue at his birthplce in Dumraon

Religious beliefs

Though a pious Shi’ite Muslim, he was also, like many Indian musicians, regardless of religion, a devotee of Saraswati, the Hindu Goddess of wisdom and arts and often played at Hindu temples, including the famous Vishwanath Temple in Varanasi, on the banks of the river Ganga He also performed for spiritual master Prem Rawat

Career

Bismillah Khan was perhaps single-handedly responsible for making the shehnai a famous classical instrument. He brought the shehnai to the center stage of Indian music with his concert in the Calcutta All India Music Conference in 1937. He was credited with having almost monopoly over the instrument as he and the shehnai are almost synonyms.

Khan is one of the finest musicians in post-independent Indian classical music and one of the best examples of Hindu-Muslim unity in India. He played the shehnai to audiences across the world. He was known to be so devoted to his art form that he referred to shehnai as his begum (wife in Urdu) after his wife died. On his death, as an honour, his shehnai was buried with him. He was known for his vision of spreading peace and love through music.

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Performances at Red Fort

Khan had the rare honor of performing at Delhi’s Red Fort on the eve of India’s Independence in 1947. He also performed raga Kafi from the Red Fort on the eve of India’s first Republic Day ceremony, on 26 January 1950. His recital had become a cultural part of India’s Independence Day celebrations, telecast on Doordarshan every year on 15 August. After the prime minister’s speech from Lal Qila (the Red Fort,) in Old Delhi, Doordarshan would broadcast a live performance by the shehnai maestro. This tradition dated from the days of Nehru.

Popular culture

Khan had a brief association with movies. He played the shehnai for Rajkumar‘s role of Appanna in the Kannada movie Sanaadi Appanna. He acted in Jalsaghar, a movie by Satyajit Ray and provided sound of shehnai in Goonj Uthi Shehnai (1959). Noted director Goutam Ghose directed Sange Meel Se Mulaqat, a documentary about the life of Khan.In the 1967 film The Graduate, there is a poster advertising “Bismillah Khan and the seven musicians” on a busy street of Berkeley, California.

Students

Khan seldom accepted students. He thought that if he would be able to share his knowledge it wouldn’t be useful as it would only give his students a little knowledge. Some of his followers include S. Ballesh as well as Khan’s own sons, Nazim Hussain and Nayyar Hussain.

Personal life

On 17 August 2006, Khan was taken ill and admitted to the Heritage Hospital, Varanasi for treatment. He died after four days on 21 August 2006 because of a cardiac arrest. He is survived by five daughters, three sons and a large number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren, and his adopted daughter Dr Soma Ghosh (famous Hindustani shastriya sangeet exponent).

The Government of India declared a day of national mourning on his death. His body along with a Shehnai was buried at Fatemain burial ground of old Varanasi under a neem tree with 21-gun salute from Indian Army.

Legacy

Sangeet Natak Akademi, New Delhi, instituted the ‘Ustad Bismillah Khan Yuva Puraskar’ in 2007, in his honour. It is given to young artists in the field of music, theatre and dance.

Awards and recognitions

Awards

Recognitions

Bismillah Khan had honorary doctorates from

Others include

Discography

Albums
  • Sanaadi Appanna – Played shehnai for Rajkumar‘s role in the movie.
  • Goonj Uthi Shehnai (1959) – shehnai recitals throughout the movie for Rajendra Kumar‘s role.
  • Maestro’s Choice (February 1994)
  • Megh Malhar, Vol. 4 (the other piece in the album is by Kishori Amonkar) (September 1994)
  • Live at the Queen Elizabeth Hall (September 2000)
  • Live in London, Vol. 2 (September 2000)
Contributing artist

Biographies

  • Bismillah Khan: the shehnai maestro, by Neeraja Poddar. Rupa & Co., 2004. ISBN 81-291-0351-6.
  • Monograph on Shehnai maestro Bismillah Khan, by Amar jyoti, Shivnath Jha, Alok Jain, Anjali Sinha. Pub. Neena Jha & Shivnath Jha, 2005. ISBN 8175256400.
(Source: 03/21/2016 – Wikipedia.org)

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