IMC – India meets Classic presents …

… radio shows for Indian (Music) Culture

Archive for May, 2015

CH – Raga CDs of the Months (05/2015): Studies in Indian Classical Music (part 1).

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 25, 2015

The promotion initiative IMC – India meets Classic will present the topic “Studies of Indian classical music” (part 1 and following). Beside original music from India this radio show will answer the substantial question for all those who are interested to study Indian music: “How to choose a teacher (Guru)?”. – The pro and cons of different methods of teaching will be lit up in this series considering the characteristics of instrumental play and Indian vocal styles.

At the latest since the musical discovery journeys of Menuhin and Coltrane the broader interest in studying Indian Classical music grew in the West. It is unbroken until today.

Yehudi Menuhin (Violin), Ravi Shankar (Sitar) and Alla Rakha (Tabla)The violin virtuoso Sir Yehudi Menuhin visited India in 1952 for the first time. Later Menuhin took lessons from the legendary sitar player Ravi Shankar. The modal concept of Indian Ragas is reflected also in the music of the jazz saxophonists John Coltrane. Coltrane’s composition “India” (from the jazz album “Live at the Village Vanguard”) originates from the year 1961, in which he met Ravi Shankar. Coltrane studied Indian religion and philosophy apart from Indian classics.

dates of broadcasting…

25th May 2015 – 04:00 pm EST (10:00 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(premiere: 21st December 2010 – 09:000 pm CET @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

For the approach to the musical training the new radio show orientates with two western terms. As there would be: music schools and music sciences.

In that more than 2000 years old system of Indian classical music of North and South India we find the similar term Gharana. The Gharana-s are less a kind of music schools in the Western sense. Gharana is a name for the heritage of a musical tradition which is overhanded mostly in oral form over many generations from teacher (guru) to pupil (shishya).
Gharana is derived from the Hindu word “Ghar“, i.e. family or house. There exist Gharana-s for singing, instrumental play, the Indian percussion instrument Tabla, for Indian dance and some wind and string instruments. In view of more than 30 existing Gharana-s we are limiting part 1 of our topic “Studies of Indian classical music” to the oldest singing form of the North Indian classical music: the Dhrupad.

Grandsons of Zakiruddin Khan and Allabande Khan - The Dagar Brothers ( from left to right): Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar( b1933), Ustad Nasir Zahiruddin Dagar(1932-1994), Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar(b 1927), Ustad Nasir Aminuddin Dagar(1923-2000), Ustad Zia Mohiuddin Dagar (1929-1990), Ustad Nasir Faiyazuddin Dagar(1934-1989), Ustad Hussain Sayeeduddin Dagar(b1939).

Grandsons of Zakiruddin Khan and Allabande Khan – The Dagar Brothers ( from left to right): Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar( b1933), Ustad Nasir Zahiruddin Dagar(1932-1994), Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar(b 1927), Ustad Nasir Aminuddin Dagar(1923-2000), Ustad Zia Mohiuddin Dagar (1929-1990), Ustad Nasir Faiyazuddin Dagar(1934-1989), Ustad Hussain Sayeeduddin Dagar(b1939).

The oldest music school for Dhrupad is the Dagar Gharana. It’s name refers directly to the Dagar Family (see below) which determines the development of the Dhrupad style until today, unbroken since more than 20 generations.

The term Gharana is not even as old as the family traditions. The social meaning of the Gharana-s became of relevance for the stylistic idendity of an artist in instrumental play or vocal lately in the midth of 19th  century. The Gharana-s of the Dhrupad style have a pre-history. All Gharana-s are attributed only to four lineages, the so called Bani-s (or Vani-s).  Bani means “word“, it is derived from the Sanskrit “Vani“, i.e. “voice“. The Banis are style concepts. The four Dhrupad Bani-s had been constituted by four outstanding musicians at the court of the mughal emperor Akbar (1542-1605). There are: Gaudhari Vani or named as Gohar or Gauri Vani in the tradition of the famous court musician Tansen, Khandari Vani of Samokhana Simbha (Naubad Khan), Nauhari Vani in the tradition of Shrichanda and Dangari or Dagar Vani of Vrija Chanda.

If one looks further back in the music history of India one discovers in the 7th century a link to the Bani-s. The four Bani-s of the Dhrupad had developed from seven in the core five (5) singing styles, the Geeti-s. These Geeti-s are: Suddha, Bhinna, Gauri, Vegswara and Sadharani. Gaudi Geeti is not far more in use.

(Source: The Dagar Tradition – www.dagardvani.org)
The Dagar Gharana

The Dagar family’s contribution to the perpetuation and enrichment of this art, while pre­serving its original purity, has been so precious, and the fact that the history of this family can be traced back for 20 generations without a break is so unique, that the family can be said to represent a microcosm of the history of Indian classical music.

Dhrupad reached its apogee in the 16th century, during the reign of the Moghul emperor Akbar. At that time there were four Schools of Dhrupad, representing this art in all its diversity. Brij Chand Rajput was of Dagar lineage, so the school of Dhrupad that he headed was called Dagar Vani. The other three Vanis, Khandar, Nauvahar and Gobarhar. respectively, almost disappeared in the course of time, and only in the Dagar Vani has the pure tradition of Dhrupad been maintained and brought down to our day. Until the 16th century the Dagars were Brahmins, but circumstances constrained their ancestor, Baba Gopal Das Pandey, to embrace Islam, and he came to be known as Baba Imam Khan Dagar . One of his two sons, Ustad Behram Khan Dagar, was the most famous and learned musician of his time, in the 18th and 19th centuries. During the 125 years of life that God granted him, he applied himself to the acquisition of a thorough knowledge of the Sanskrit sacred texts. He devoted the greater part of his life to the rigorous analysis of these texts in order to translate the formal musical rules into a pragmatic teaching method. He distilled the style of singing, the gayaki, to a degree of purity and clarity never known before, elaborating the alap and rendering singable the technical forms.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs des Monats (05/2015): Das Studium der indisch klassischen Musik (Teil 1)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 25, 2015


Die Förderinitiative IMC- India meets Classic wird mit dem Thema “Das Studium der indisch-klassischen Musik, Teil 1″ (und Folgende) wesentliche Fragen beantworten können, worauf bei der Wahl eines Lehrers, eines Guru-s zu achten ist, dabei die Vor- und Nachteile unterschiedlicher Unterrichtsmethoden beleuchtet und dafür Besonderheiten im Instrumentalspiel oder indischen Gesang berücksichtigt werden.

Spätestens seit den musikalische Entdeckungsreisen von Menuhin und Coltrane wuchs im Westen das breitere Interesse für ein Studium der indisch-klassischen Musik. Es ist bis heute ungebrochen.

Yehudi Menuhin (Violin), Ravi Shankar (Sitar) and Alla Rakha (Tabla)Der Geigenvirtuose Sir Yehudi Menuhin besuchte 1952 erstmals Indien. Später nahm Yehudi Menuhin Unterricht bei dem legendären Sitarspieler Ravi Shankar. Das modale Konzept der indischen Ragas spiegelt sich auch in der Musik des Jazz-Saxophonisten John Coltrane wieder. Coltrane’s Komposition “India” (aus dem Jazzalbum “Live at the Village Vanguard”) stammt aus dem Jahre 1961, in dem er Ravi Shankar traf. Coltrane studierte neben der indischen Klassik auch die indische Religion und Philosophie.

Sendetermine…

25. Mai 2015 – 22:00 Uhr CET (04:00 p.m. EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(Premiere: 21.12.2010 – 21:00 Uhr @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Orientieren wir uns mit zwei westlichen Begriffen für die Annäherung an die musikalische Ausbildung. Als da wären: Musikschulen und die Musikwissenschaft.

Dazu begegnet uns in dem mehr als 2000 Jahre alten System der indisch-klassischen Musik Nord- und Südindiens analog der Begriff Gharana. Die Gharana-s sind eine Art Musikschulen, weniger im westlichen Sinne. Gharana ist eine Bezeichnung für eine über viele Generationen weitervererbte, musikalische Tradition. Gharana leitet sich aus dem Hinduwort “Ghar” ab, das heisst Familie oder Haus. Es gibt Gharana-s für den Gesang, das Instrumentalspiel, für das indische Perkussionsinstrument Tabla, für den indischen Tanz und einige Blas- u. Saiteninstrumente. Angesichts der mehr als 30 existierenden Gharanas beschränken wir uns in Teil 1 unseres Themas “Das Studium der indisch-klassischen Musik” auf die älteste Gesangsform der nordindischen Klassik, den Dhrupad.

Grandsons of Zakiruddin Khan and Allabande Khan - The Dagar Brothers ( from left to right): Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar( b1933), Ustad Nasir Zahiruddin Dagar(1932-1994), Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar(b 1927), Ustad Nasir Aminuddin Dagar(1923-2000), Ustad Zia Mohiuddin Dagar (1929-1990), Ustad Nasir Faiyazuddin Dagar(1934-1989), Ustad Hussain Sayeeduddin Dagar(b1939).

Die älteste Musikschule des Dhrupad ist die Dagar-Gharana. Ihr Namensgeber, die Dagar-Familie (s.u.) bestimmt bis heute, ungebrochen seit mehr als 20 Generationen die Entwicklung des Dhrupads.

Der Begriff Gharana ist selbst gar nicht so alt wie die Familientraditionen. Ihre gesellschaftliche Bedeutung wurde für die stilistische Zuordnung eines Künstlers im Instrumentalspiel oder Gesang erst Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts ausgeprägt. Die Gharanas des Dhrupadgesangs haben eine Vorgeschichte. Alle Gharanas gehen auf nur vier (4) Abstimmungslinien zurück, die sogenannen Bani-s (oder Vani-s).  Bani bedeutet “Wort”, es leitet sich aus dem Sanskritstamm “Vani” ab, d.h. “Stimme”. Die Banis sind Stilkonzepte. Die vier Banis werden auf vier herausragende Musiker am Hofe des Moghulherrschers Akbars (1542-1605) zurückgeführt. Es sind: Gaudhari Vani, auch Gohar oder Gauri Vani genannt, sie steht in der Tradition des berühmten Hofmusikers Tansen, dann Khandari Vani von Samokhana Simbha (Naubad Khan), Nauhari Vani in der Tradition von Shrichanda und Dangari oder Dagar Vani von Vrija Chanda.

Blickt man in der Musikgeschichte Indiens weiter zurück, entdeckt man zu den Banis eine Verbindung aus dem 7. Jahrhundert. Die vier Banis des Dhrupads haben sich aus sieben bzw. im Kern fünf (5) Gesangsstilen entwickelt, den Geetis. Die Geetis sind: Suddha, Bhinna, Gauri, Vegswara und Sadharani. Gaudi Geeti ist nicht weiter mehr im Gebrauch.

(Quelle: The Dagar Tradition – www.dagardvani.org)
The Dagar Gharana

The Dagar family’s contribution to the perpetuation and enrichment of this art, while pre­serving its original purity, has been so precious, and the fact that the history of this family can be traced back for 20 generations without a break is so unique, that the family can be said to represent a microcosm of the history of Indian classical music.

Dhrupad reached its apogee in the 16th century, during the reign of the Moghul emperor Akbar. At that time there were four Schools of Dhrupad, representing this art in all its diversity. Brij Chand Rajput was of Dagar lineage, so the school of Dhrupad that he headed was called Dagar Vani. The other three Vanis, Khandar, Nauvahar and Gobarhar. respectively, almost disappeared in the course of time, and only in the Dagar Vani has the pure tradition of Dhrupad been maintained and brought down to our day. Until the 16th century the Dagars were Brahmins, but circumstances constrained their ancestor, Baba Gopal Das Pandey, to embrace Islam, and he came to be known as Baba Imam Khan Dagar . One of his two sons, Ustad Behram Khan Dagar, was the most famous and learned musician of his time, in the 18th and 19th centuries. During the 125 years of life that God granted him, he applied himself to the acquisition of a thorough knowledge of the Sanskrit sacred texts. He devoted the greater part of his life to the rigorous analysis of these texts in order to translate the formal musical rules into a pragmatic teaching method. He distilled the style of singing, the gayaki, to a degree of purity and clarity never known before, elaborating the alap and rendering singable the technical forms.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

A – Raga CDs of the Months (05/2015): JALTARANG – Waves of Sound

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 24, 2015

Raga CDs of the Months

JALTARANG – Waves of Sound

JalTarang is the name of an antique, Indian instrument. JALTARANG is Hindi and means “waves in the water” (literate forms: Jal Tarang, JalTarang, Jal tarang or Jal Yantra).

date of broaddasting…

24th May 2015 – 11:00-11:58 pm MEST (05:00 pm EST) @ Radio FRO (A)
(premiere: 1st January 2008 (09:00 pm) @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

The JalTarang had been developed from percussion instruments like Gongs and Gamelans, those played in Java, in Myanmar (earlier Burma) and on Bali. JalTarang dips for the first time in the Middle Ages (17th century) as a term in the Sangeet Parij(a)at, a scientific research work about Indian music written by Ahobal.

The JALTARANG is a percussion instrument, which belongs to the group of the “self sounder“, so called idiophones. The spectrum of this instrument type reaches from the muzzle drum, clip ring to the Chinese bell play.

The Indian JalTarang uses sound bowls for it’s periodic resonance. Depending upon the level of the instrumentalist an ensemble of 15 to maximum 22 bowls is used being made of China porcelain.

The sound is produced by slim sticks made of bamboo hitten on the bowl’s edge shifting the porcelain body in oscillations. Different sizes of bowls are used and filled with water for the accurate tuning of the single tones.

Milind Tulankar on the JalTarang Dr. Ragini Trivedi - JalTarang workshop

Milind Tulankar on the JalTarang | Dr. Ragnin Trivedi (JalTarang workshop)

Nowadays the JalTarang is played very rarely in India. It almost became extinct. Although it’s elegantly, easily sound is of large popularity amongst the audience. Outstanding Jaltarang players are Seethalakshmi, in India simply known as Seetha (Doraiswamy), Dr. Ragini Trivedi and the Indian maestro Milind Tulankar.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

A – Raga CDs des Monats (05/2015): JALTARANG – Wellen des Klangs

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 24, 2015

 

Raga CDs des Monats

JALTARANG – Wellen des Klangs

JalTarang ist der Name eines antiken, indischen Instruments (Schreibweisen: Jal Tarang, JalTarang, Jal-tarang o. Jal-Yantra). JALTARANG ist Hindi und heisst „Wellen im Wasser“.

Sendetermine…

24. Mai 2015 – 23:00-23:58 MEST (05:00 pm EST) @ Radio FRO (A)
(Premiere: 1. Januar 2008 (21:00) @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Das JalTarang hat sich aus den Schlaginstrumenten, den Gongs und Gamelans entwickelt, die in Java, in Myanmar, dem frueheren Burma und auf Bali gespielt wurden. Erstmalig taucht JalTarang als Begriff im Mittelalter (17. Jhdt.) auf, im Sangeet Parij(a)at (Anm.: Wissenschaftliche Abhandlung zur indischen Musik von Ahobal).

Mit dem JALTARANG handelt es sich um ein Perkussionsinstrument, das zu der Gruppe der „Selbstklinger“ gehoert, s.g. Idiophone. Das Spektrum dieses Instrumententypus reicht vom Schellenring, der Maultrommel bis zum Chinesischen Glockenspiel.

Das indische JalTarang verwendet fuer die Eigenresonanz Klangschalen. Je nach Spielniveau des Instrumentalisten kommt ein Ensemble von 15 bis 22 Schalen aus chinesischem Porzellan zum Einsatz.

Die Klangerzeugung erfolgt mittels schlanker Staebe aus Bambus durch Schlaege auf den Schalenrand, mit dem der Klangkoerper aus Porzellan in Schwingungen versetzen wird. Neben unterschiedlichen Groessen werden alle Schalen zur exakten Stimmung der Einzeltoene mit Wasser gefuellt.

Milind Tulankar on the JalTarang Dr. Ragini Trivedi - JalTarang workshop

Milind Tulankar auf dem JalTarang | Dr. Ragnin Trivedi (JalTarang Workshop)

Das JalTarang wird in Indien heutzutage sehr selten gespielt. Es ist nahezu ausgestorben, obgleich sich sein eleganter, leichter Klang beim Publikum grosser Beliebtheit erfreut. Herausragende Jaltarangspieler sind Seethalakshmi, in Indien einfach nur Seetha (Doraiswamy) genannt, Dr. Ragini Trivedi und der indische Maestro Milind Tulankar.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (05/2015): KALPITA SANGITA – Kompositionen in der indischen Klassik.

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 21, 2015

SURDAS & SHYAM MANOHAR (Lihto/Print) - Artist: Vasudeo H.Pandya

SURDAS (Weise/Komponist) & SHYAM MANOHAR

Die indische Klassik wurde von der Förderinitiative IMC – India meets Classic bisher in den IMC-Sendungen  (Radio) auf der Basis der Ragaformen vorgestellt.

Für die nordindische Klassik, die Hindustani-Musik sind die Ragas nach dem Thaat-System mit 10 Hauptskalen klassifiziert, und für die südindische Klassik, der Carnatischen Musik sind es 72 Ragams aus dem s.g. Melakarta-System.

Die Ragaskalen sind nicht Melodieformen, im Sinne eines Note-für-Note durchkomponierten Musikstücks, in festgelegter Tonart und in der Partiturschrift eine für jeden Takt exakt definierte Modulation (Dynamik).

Ragas sind viel mehr als ein komplexes Regelwerk zu verstehen. Ragas sind ein Rahmen, darin sich der Interpret  frei bewegen kann – vokal oder instrumental. Ragas sind monophon, es gibt keine Akkorde.

Die mikrotonale Struktur (Shruti-s) und das komplexe Rhythmiksystem (Taala) garantieren eine äußerst nuancierte Ornamentik, mit der eine Ragaperformance facettenreich dargeboten werden kann.

Sendetermine…
21. Mai 2015 – 21:00 Uhr CET (03:00 pm EST) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(Premiere: 16. Nov 2010 – 21:00 Uhr CET @ TIDE Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Amir Khusro and Hazrat Nizam-ud-Awaliya (Hyderabad, circa 1750-70 A.D., National Museum, New Delhi)

Amir Kushro (Komponist)

Ein kompositorisches Verständnis wie im Westen existiert in der indischen Klassik nicht. Doch wird der Begriff Komposition auch in der indischen Musik verwendet.
Als Kalpita Sangita bezeichnet man die “rezitative Musik”, während Manodharma Sangita die s.g. “kreative Musik” bedeutet.

Kalpita Sangita ist eine Interpretation, die auf bestehende Kompositionen zurückgeht. Es können  Eigenkompositionen sein oder Werke von einem anderen Komponisten, einem Vaggeyakara.

Dagegen wird Manodharma Sangita von einem Vokalisten oder Instrumentalisten aus dem Stehgreif (‘ex tempore‘) erschaffen, als Improvisation im Stile des Jazz, auf der Basis der modalen Struktur indischer Ragaskalen.
Die November-Sendung “Raga CDs des Monats” aber beschäftigt sich mit dem kompositorischen Konzept von Kalpita Sangita.

Bildquellen:

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the Months (05/2015): KALPITA SANGITA – Compositions in Indian Classics.

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 21, 2015

SURDAS & SHYAM MANOHAR (Lihto/Print) - Artist: Vasudeo H.Pandya

SURDAS (sage /composer) & SHYAM MANOHAR

The promotion initiative IMC – India meets Classic has presented so fare Indian Classical Music in it’s monthly radio broadcastings on the basis of raga scales.

For North Indian Classics (Hindustani music) the Ragas are classified according to the Thaat system with 10 parent scales. The Carnatic music (South Indian Classics) exist 72 ragams of the Melakarta system.

Raga scales aren’t melody forms, in the sense of composed music pieces “note-for-note” with fixed keys (major and minor)  or exact defined modulations (dynamics) for each bar by written notations.

Ragas are to be understood as more than a complex sete of rules. Ragas are a framework, in it the interpreter freely can move – vocally or instrumentally. Ragas are  monophon (without chords).

The micro-tonal structure (shruti-s) and complex rhythm system (Taala)  guarantee an extremely ornamental art. Raga performances are multifaceted.

dates of broadcasting…

21st May 2015 – 03:00 p.m. EST (09:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(premiere: 16th Nov 2010 – 09:00 pm CET @ TIDE Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Amir Khusro and Hazrat Nizam-ud-Awaliya (Hyderabad, circa 1750-70 A.D., National Museum, New Delhi)

Amir Kushro (composer)

A compositional understanding as in Western classical music does not exist in Indian Classics. But the term ‘composition’ is used also in Indian music.
The term Kalpita Sangita defines the ‘recitative music‘ while Manodharma Sangita means the ‘creative music‘.

Kalpita Sangita is an interpretation form which applies to existing compositions: original compositions or creations of other composers. A composer is called Vaggeyakara.

On the other hand Manodharma Sangita is created by a vocalist or instrumentalist ‘ex tempore‘ spontaneously, a kind of improvisational style as known in Jazz, on the basis of the modal structure of  Indian raga scales.
The radio broadcasting in November “Raga CDs of the Months” is occupied with the compositional concept of Kalpita Sangita.

Sources of pictures (paintings):

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (05/2015): Energie des Klangs – Raga Chikitsa.

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 18, 2015

Energie des Klangs – Raga Chikitsa. [Untertitel: Nada Chikitsa]

In Indien hat man die Resonanzfunktion von Ragas für die emotionale Befindlichkeit und Gesundheit des Menschen, ihre physiologischer Wirkung auf Geist, Körper und Seele als komplementäre Medizin sehr früh erkannt. Schon in den indischen Tempeln wurden bei den Zeremonien rhythmische Klänge auf Glocken, aus Hörnern und Muschelschalen verwendet, aus dem Wissen um ihre therapeutische Wirkung.

Musikalischer Klang, das sind Schwingungsmuster (Dwhani), eine energetische Form in Bewegung, die durch das Medium Luft (Vayu)  übertragen wird und den menschlichen Körper bis in jede einzelne Zelle durchdringen kann. Im indischen Verständnis ist Musik eine energetische Form, eine kosmische/universelle Form als Quell allen Seins.

Sendetermine…

18. Mai 2015 – 22:00-24:00 Uhr CET (04:00-06:00 pm EST) @ TIDE Radio (DE)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Klang besitzt heilende Kraft. Der Rhythmus in einer Musik steht in direkter Beziehung zum Herzschlag. Er findet seine Equivalenz im Tempo und Rhythmus. Der Atem entspricht im hinduistischen Verständnis dem Klang der Lebensenergie, Phrana. In der Geschichte der südindischen Klassik hat sich das uns heute bekannte Melakartasystem entwickelt. Es ist eine Klassifzierung von 72 Hauptragams…  die Zahl 72 entspricht den 72 wichtigen Nervensträngen.

Effect of Saptaswaras and Chakra Meditation

Effect of Saptaswaras and Chakra Meditation (Source: A. Mahesh – Music Therapy Blog)

Die ältesten systematischen Texte, die man in der Menschheitsgeschichte kennt, sind die Veden. Es sind Abhandlungen über Philosophie, das Empfinden und Lebensweisheiten für ein gesundes Leben. Musik gehört zur Updaveda, einer untergeordneten Veda. Upaveda ist ein wissenschaftlich orientiertes System, das auf den vedischen Lehren aufbauen. Es gibt vier (4) Upavedas: 1. den Ayurveda (über Heilkunde); 2. den Gandharvaveda (über Musik, Tanz uns Ästhetik); 3. den Dhanurveda (über Bogenschießen, Kriegs- und Kampfkunst) und 4. den Sthapatyaveda (über Architektur, Stadtplanung etc.).

In unserer Sendung Nada – Ein Konzept des Klangs haben wir uns mit dem äusseren und inneren Klang, dem Klang-Yoga befasst. Sie finden die Sendung in unserem Online-Archive unter www.imcradio.net/onlinearchiv. Hier schliesst das Thema der heutigen Sendung an: “Energie des Klangs – Raga Chikitsa” . Es befasst sich explizit mit der therapeutischen Wirkung der Ragaskalen der nordindischen und südindischen Klassik.

Raga Chikitsa ist eine Schrift des antiken Indiens. In der Übersetzung heisst Raga Chikitsa: Das Wissen über die Verwendung der Ragas zum Zwecke der Heilung. Chikitsa stammt aus dem Sanskrit und bedeutet für sich: Die Praxis der medizinischen Wissenschaft und ihre therapeutische Anwendung.

Bringen wir das Wissen der indisch klassischen Musik – Raga Ragini Vidaya – und Raga Chikitsa zusammen, verfügen wir über die Grundbausteine, um die therapeutische Wirkung der indischen Ragas zu beschreiben.

————-

Ergänz. Hinweis: In der Samaveda, eine antike Schrift des Ayurveda werden Klangphänome für musiktherapeutische Zwecke detailliert beschrieben.  Im ayurvedischen Verständnis wird der menschliche Körper von den drei Doshas dominiert: Vatta, Pitta und Kapha. Sie finden die Sendung “Ragas und ihr Zeitzyklus im ayurvedischen Verstaendnis” in unserem Sendearchiv unter http://www.imcradio.net/onlinearchiv .

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the Months (05/2015): Energy of the Sound – Raga Chikitsa.

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 18, 2015

Energy of the Sound – Raga Chikitsa. [Subtitle: Nada Chikitsa]

In India had been recognized the response function of ragas as complementary medicine very early for the emotional well-being and health of the people, their physiological effect on the mind, body and soul. In the Indian temples had been used rhythmic sounds of bells, horns and use of shells for the ceremonies, from the knowledge of their therapeutic effect.

Musical sound and its vibrational patterns (Dwhani) are a form of energy in motion transmitted through the medium of air (Vayu) which can penetrate the human body down to each individual cell. In the Indian understanding of music the sound is an energetic form of a cosmic / universal dimension as the source of all being.

dates of broadcasting …

18th May 2015 – 04:00-06:00 pm EST (10:00-12:00 pm CET) @ TIDE Radio (DE)
(premiere: 19th February 2012 @ radio multicult.fm)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Sound has healing power. The rhythm in music is directly related to the heart beat. It finds its equivalence in tempo and rhythm. The breath corresponds to the Hindu understanding as Phrana as the sound of life energy. In the history of South Indian classical music (Carnatic) the Melakarta system was developed as we know it today. It is a classification of 72 main ragams. The number 72 corresponds to the 72 main nerve trunks.

Effect of Saptaswaras and Chakra Meditation

Effect of Saptaswaras and Chakra Meditation (Source: A. Mahesh – Music Therapy Blog)

The oldest systematic texts, which are known in human history are the Vedas. There are treatises on philosophy, the sense of life and wisdom for a healthy living. Music is part of Updaveda, a sub category of the Vedas. Upaveda is a science-based system built on the Vedic teachings. There are four (4) Upavedas: 1. Ayurveda (on medicine), 2. Gandharvaveda (about music, dance aesthetics us), 3. Dhanurveda (about archery, war and martial arts) and 4. Sthapatyaveda (on architecture, urban planning, etc.).

In our radio show Nada – A concept of sound we have dealt with the outer and inner sound, the nada yoga (nada = sound). You can find the show in our archive for re-listening – www.imcradio.net/onlinearchives . This topic leads us to the theme of today’s program: “Raga Chikitsa“. It deals explicitly with the therapeutic effect of the Raga scales of North Indian (Hindustani) and South Indian Classics (Carnatic).
Chikitsa raga is a scripture of the ancient India. The translation of Raga Chikitsa is: “The knowledge about the use of ragas for healing.” – Chikitsa comes from Sanskrit and means on its own: “The practice of medical science and its therapeutic application“.

Bringing the knowledge of Indian classical music – Raga Ragini Vidaya – and Raga Chikitsa together, we have the basic blocks to describe the therapeutic effects of Indian ragas.

———————–

Suppl. Note: In the Samaveda, an ancient text of Ayurveda describes in detail the phenomenon of sound for music therapeutic purposes. The human body is dominated by the three doshas: Vatta, Pitta and Kapha. You will find the program “Ragas Time Cycles – Ayurvedic Princips” in our media archive for re-listening: www.imcradio.net/onlinearchive .

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (05/2015): Von Hawaii nach Südasien – Die indisch-klassische Gitarre (Langfassung)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 16, 2015

Die Förderinitiative IMC – India meets Classic präsentiert Ihnen in der Sendung “Raga CDs des Monats” das Thema “Von Hawaii nach Südasien – Die indisch-klassische Gitarre“.

In dem Programmverlauf der letzten Jahre (2006-2015) zur indisch-klassischen Musik haben wir Instrumente kennengelernt, die aus dem Westen stammen (s. http://www.imcradio.net/archive ). Wie die Violine in der südindischen Klassik, das handbetriebene Harmonium als Begleitinstrument und Nachfolger der Sarangi, der indischen Fiddel – oder das Saxophon, wie wir es aus dem Jazz kennen und die Mandoline, ein doppelsaitiges Instrument aus Italien. Es gibt verschiedensten Gründe, die den Einzug der westlicher Instrumente erklären in das Sammelsurium der traditionell-indischen Blas-, Saiten- und Percussioninstrumente.
Da waren die Militärorchester des Britisch Empire, französische Missionare im 19. Jahrhundert, die Hofkapellen der Maharajas oder Filmmusiken aus Mumbai, der Bollywoodhauptstadt. Der Klang dieser neuen Instrumente inspirierte Musiker, zu experimentieren. Mit baulichen Veränderungen und besonderen Spieltechnicken adaptierte man sie für die besonderen Interpretationsstile der Ragas und Ragams in der nord- und südindischen Klassik.

Sendetermine…

17. Mai 2015 – 15:00-17:00 Uhr CET (09:00-11:00 am EST) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(Premiere: 25.05.2012 – 21:00 Uhr @ radio multicult.fm) 

InternetStream (Web & Mobile Radio) | PodCasting | broadcasting plan

Mit der s.g. slide bar wird die Höhe des Gitarrentons definiert durch das Abgreifen, oder viel mehr durch das Gleiten mit einem Eisenstück über die freischwingenden Saiten, anstatt sie durch das Abgreifen an den Gitarrenbünden (frets) zu verkürzen oder zu verlängern. Neben Eigenanfertigungen gibt es auf dem Markt unterschiedlichste Aufführungen von slide bars in Form, Materialien und Farbe. Noch bis in die 80er Jahre experimentierten Hersteller mit neuen Materialien. Aus Glas oder Pyrex, aus anorganischem Kobaldoxid bis zu Knochen oder Porzellan können verschiedenste Klangfarben erzeugt werden.

Verschiedene Modelle der indisch-klassischen Gitarre (Slide-Gitarre)…

(v.l.n.r.: Hansa Veena, Chaturangi, Shankar-Gitarre, Mohan Veena, Swar Veena)

Die Geschichte überliefert, dass im Jahre 1931 ein junger Hawaianer nach Indien kam, mit seiner Gitarre im Gepäck. Tau Moe war sein Name. Die Bedeutung von Tau Moe für die indische Slide-Gitarre hat ihn in Indien bekannter werden lassen, als in seiner Heimat. Zuallererst wurden auf der Hawaii-Gitarre Lieder im indischen West-Bengal gespielt. Es waren Kompositionen aus dem Repertoire des ersten indischen Literaturnobelpreisträgers Rabindranat Tagore. Mit diesem Liedgut hat sich bis heute ein eigenes Gesangsgenre entwickelt, der Rabindra Sangeet.

Neben der Einführung und Spieltechnik der Hawaii-Gitarre durch Tao Moe gibt es eine weitere Version. Es wird erzählt, dass Gabriel Davion das Gitarrenspiel mit einer Steelbar in Indien einführte. Gabriel Davion war ein Seemann indischer Abstammung. Er soll von portugiesischen Seglern im Jahre 1876 nach Hawaii verschleppt worden sein. Gabriel Davion hat sich wohl für die Slide-Technik auch an Instrumenten orientiert: an der Vichitra Vina und dem Gotuvadyam, zwei indische Lauten. Bereits seit dem 11. Jahrhundert kennt man in Indien die Slidetechnik.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the Month (05/2015): From Hawaii to South Asia – The Indian Classical Guitar (long version)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on May 16, 2015

With the IMC programme in recent years (2006-2015) for Indian classical music we experienced instruments that come from the West ( see http://www.imcradio.net/archives ). Like the violin in the South Indian classical music, the hand-operated harmonium as an accompanying instrument and successor of the Sarangi (Indian fiddle) or the saxophone, as we know it from Jazz and the mandolin, a double-string instrument from Italy.
There are many reasons that explain the arrival of Western instruments in the collective of traditional Indian wind, string and percussion instruments. There existed the military orchestras of the British Empire, French missionaries in the 19th century, the chapels of the Maharajas or film scores from Mumbai as the Bollywood capital. The sound of these new instruments inspired musicians to experiment. With structural changes and special playing techniques they adapted to the particular interpretations and Indian style of Ragas and Ragams (North and South Indian classics).

dates of broadcasting…

17th May 2015 – 09:00-11:00 am EST (03:00-05:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(premiere: 25th May 2015 – 03:00-05:00 pm EST @ radio multicult.fm)
InternetStream (Web & Mobile Radio) | PodCasting | broadcasting plan

The so called slide bar defines the height of the guitar tone by sliding on the free-swinging strings a lot more using a piece of iron, rather than to shorten or to extend by tapping the frets (on the guitar keyboard). Beside their own creations of slide bars there are various forms, materials and colours on the market. Until the 80s manufacturers experimented with new materials. Glas or pyrex, inorganic cobalt oxid, bone or porcelain can produce different timbres of sound.

different models of Indian Classical Guitars (Slide guitars) …

(from let to right: Hansa Veena, Chaturangi, Shankar Guitar, Mohan Veena, Swar Veena)

History conveys that in 1931 a young Hawaiians came to India with his guitar in the luggage. Tau Moe was his name. The importance of Tau Moe for the Indian slide guitar made him well known in India, more as in his homeland. First musicians in Indian West Bengal played songs on the Hawaiian guitar, performing compositions from the repertoire of the first Indian Nobel laureate Tagore Rabindranat (Rec.: With these lyrics and melodies of Tagore a separate vocal genre developed as ‘Rabindra Sangeet’).

In addition to introducing the Hawaiian guitar and playing techniques of by Tao Moe there exist another version of narration. It is said that Gabriel Davion introduced in India to play the guitar with a steel bar. Gabriel Davion was a sailor of Indian descent. He was allegedly abducted by Portuguese sailors in 1876 to Hawaii. Gabriel Davion had oriented himself probably to the slide technique of the Vichitra Vina and Gotuvadyam, two Indian instruments (lutes). Since the 11th century the slide technique is known in India.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: