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Archive for January, 2015

StudioTalk with Kala Ramnath: “Nada (Sound) – 66 notes on the Violin” (DE)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 29, 2015

StudioTalk with Kala Ramnath (Violin – Hindustani)

Topic: Nada (Sound) – 66 notes on the Violin

dates of broadcasting (German Version)…

29th January 2015 – 03:00 pm EST (09:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm
(premiere: 18th November 2008 – 09:00 pm (CET) @ TIDE Radio)

broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

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Vasant Panchami Muhurta – SARASWATI Puja 2015 (24th Jan)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 24, 2015

Saraswati Puja on Vasant Panchami 2015..

Vasant Panchami day is dedicated to Saraswati, the Goddess of knowledge, music, arts, science and technology. Goddess Saraswati is worshipped on Vasant Panchami day. Vasant Panchami is also known as Shri Panchami and Saraswati Panchami. (Source: drikpanchang.com)

Panchami Tithi Begins = 00:45 on 24/Jan/2015
Panchami Tithi Ends = 22:05 on 24/Jan/2015 

Saraswati Puja is undoubtedly the most popular festival in the eastern region. Saraswati is the goddess of learning, arts and crafts. According to her different specialities she is known by different names like Bakdevi, Biraj, Sarada, Brahmi, Satarupa, Mahasweta, Sarbasukia, Prithudar, Bagiswari and, ofcourse, Saraswati.
This festival is held in the month of Magh (January-February). It is a festival celebrated by the youth, particularly students who invoke the blessings of the goddess for success in learning, arts and crafts. Throughout Bengal Saraswati Puja is celebrated in schools, colleges, clubs as well as homes.

Godess Saraswati playing the Veena (Lute)

Godess Saraswati playing the Veena (Lute)

Among all the Hindu deities, Saraswati stands out as the most controversial. Her origin is shrouded in mystery. Starting from the Vedas, Puranas, Upanishads to the popular ancient mythology, Saraswati appears through a veil of mystery.

According to the Matsya Purana, Saraswati evolved from the mouth of Brahma. Such was her beauty and grace that Brahma pursued her. As she fled in different directions a head appeared and so Brahma is attributed with five heads, she was the most unique creation of Brahma. Saraswati is our equivalent of the classical Goddess Minerva and also the Teutonic Goddess Fira. The moon and the lotus associated with Saraswati are both symbols of eternal womanhood.

Some of the many mythological stories connected with Saraswati have interesting sociological interpretations. The gods and the demons by mutual agreement decided to churn the ocean for the Arnrit or the elixir of life. Mainak mountain was used as the churning rod and Basuki as the churning rope. when Lakshmi appeared with the Arnrit kunbha both wanted the elixir. Saraswati with her exquisite beauty lured away the asuras. As the Gods were drinking the Arnrit, Rahu and Ketu, two asuras saw them and slipped in with the Gods. As they drank the Arnrit which would make them immortal like the gods, Vishnu detected them. He immediately cut off their heads. The two enraged asuras, swallowed the sun and moon but could not retain them as their throats were cut. This led to the origin of the solar and lunar eclipse. Saraswati, who was instrumental in helping the Gods to be immortal, was established in the heavens as the Goddess Saraswati.

The Gods and the Gandharvas both wanted the Soma Ras. It was again Saraswati who with her beauty and grace lured and so exhausted the Gandharvas that they could not acquire the Soma Ras which naturally went to the gods.

The Aryans fought with the non-Aryan Comi tribes (tribal dominance among the Aryans) like Nished, Sabar and Pulindar on the banks of the river Saraswati. At the request of Vishnu, Saraswati disappeared underground and again reappeared in far off Rajasthan. The tribals were thus deprived of the life-saving water. They were forced to abandon the area. In both cases we see the importance of the river Saraswati in Aryan life and how Saraswati was used to deprive the weak of water, without which life is impossible. Saraswati is known as Prithudhar (subjugator of the Aryans).

Vashishtha and Vishwamitra, the two sages, were both violently opposed to each other. Vishwamitra ordered the river Saraswati to wash away Vashishtha along with all he possessed. Saraswati refused to comply with his command. To punish Saraswati, he turned the water of the river into blood. At the behest of Shiva, the two sages became amicable and once again there was pure water in the river Saraswati.

In some areas she is believed to be the daughter of the Sun or Surya Kanya. In Western India, Saraswati is seen with the lion or peacock. She is married to Kartikeya. This is really the sun cult.

In Eastern India, particularly Bengal, Saraswati has been absorbed into the Bengali culture. She has been given the mantle of daughter of Parvati and is treated as a daughter. Vishnu had three wives-Saraswati, Ganga and Lakshmi. He was tired of Saraswati because of her superior knowledge and to gave her away to Brahma. Ganga was too frivolous and so was given to Shiva. Lakshmi quiet and sedate, remained his wife. These were the three Sris.

History tells us that the Aryans came to India through the. Khyber pass and settled in Punjab, Haryana and North Rajasthan. Saraswati is one of the seven holy rivers flowing through modern Punjab, Haryana and North Rajasthan.

In the North West along the banks of the river Saraswati. They were a pastoral people and the river was their means of communication as well as source of life.

Hence Saraswati was highly venerated and is associated with the fertility cult.

The mythological background of Saraswati shows the importance of the river Saraswati in the life of the Aryans settled along her river banks. Sociologically the River Saraswati was an important factor in ancient civilization. She is therefore a part of the fertility cult.

The Aryans who lived along the banks of the river were pastoral and rural.

All early development took place on the river bank. Consequently Saraswati came to be venerated as a symbol of knowledge.

It is evident that the upper strata of society used their superior knowledge and expertise to deprive the ignorant lower half of society.

The other name of Saraswati is Prithudhara. It has an important sociological aspect. The Comi tribes were subdued by being deprived of the most essential requirement, water. This story influenced Tagore to write Muktadhara (a play) where Bibhuti the engineer uses his superior knowledge to deprive the ignorant farmers by constructing a dam to divert the river water and satisfy the king.

The story of Kalidas has been built around Saraswati. There was a proud and learned princess who rejected all suitors who could not match her knowledge. The pundits in anger planned to marry her off to a fool. They saw a man cutting the branch on which he was sitting and decided he was the ideal fool for the princess. Kalidas was presented to the princess as a man of wisdom who only spoke in signs. The pundits answered all the princess’s questions by interpreting Kalidas’s signs. The two were married but on the wedding night the princess realized she had been duped. She kicked Kalidas out of her bed. He in sorrow and shame went to commit suicide. The Goddess Saraswati appeared and asked him to take a dip in the river. As he emerged from the river Kalidas was transformed. He began to recite verses in praise of the Goddess. Unfortunately for him he began to praise her beauty not from her feet upwards but from her breasts downwards. Saraswati in anger cursed Kalidas for his audacity. He would die in an ignonimous place.

This festival is celebrated all over Bengal with great fervour and gaiety.

(Source: 01/2015 – Mantraonnet.com)

Saraswati Vandana

Saraswati Ya Kundendu is the most famous Stuti dedicated to Goddess Saraswati and part of the famous Saraswati Stotram. It is recited during Saraswati Puja on the eve of Vasant Panchami.

या कुन्देन्दुतुषारहारधवला या शुभ्रवस्त्रावृता
या वीणावरदण्डमण्डितकरा या श्वेतपद्मासना।
या ब्रह्माच्युत शंकरप्रभृतिभिर्देवैः सदा वन्दिता
सा मां पातु सरस्वती भगवती निःशेषजाड्यापहा॥शुक्लां ब्रह्मविचार सार परमामाद्यां जगद्व्यापिनीं
वीणा-पुस्तक-धारिणीमभयदां जाड्यान्धकारापहाम्‌।
हस्ते स्फटिकमालिकां विदधतीं पद्मासने संस्थिताम्‌
वन्दे तां परमेश्वरीं भगवतीं बुद्धिप्रदां शारदाम्‌॥२॥

Saraswati Ashtottara Shat Nama Stotra

(These verses narrate some of the sacred names of Goddess Saraswati as composed and sung by Sage Agastya. Meaning of the 108 names see on the blog site “For The Divine Power and Soul“):

Saraswati Mahabhadra, Mahamaya Varaprada ;
Saraswati Mahabhadra, Mahamaya Varaprada ;
Shriprada Padmanilaya, Padmakshi Padmavaktraga
Shivanuja Pustakadhrit, Naana mudra Ramapara
Kaamarupa Mahavidya, Mahapataka Nashini
Mahashraya Malini cha, Mahabhoga Mahabhuja
Mahabhaga Mahosaha, Divyanga Survandita ;
Mahakhali Mahapasha, Mahakara Mahankusha
Sitacha Vimala Vishwa, Vidyunmala cha vaishnavi
Chandrika Chandra Vadana, Chandralekha Vibhushita,
Savitri Surasa Devi, Divya-Lankaarbhushita
Vaagdevi Vasudha Thivra, Mahabhadra Mahabala
Bhogada Bharti Bhama, Govinda Gomati Shiva
Jatila Vindhyavasa Cha, Vindyachal Virajita
Chandika Vaishnavi Brahmi, Brahmagyane Kasadhana
Saudhamini Sudhamurti, Subhadra Surpujita,
Suvasini Sunasa cha, Vinidra Padmalochana
Vidyarupa Vishalakshi, Brahma jaya Mahabala
Treyimurti Trikaalagnya
Triguna shastra rupini Shumbrasura Pramathini.

Shubrada Cha Sarvaatmika, Raktabija Nihantiri cha
Chamunda chandika Tatha
Mund Kaaya Praharna, Dhumralochna-Mardana
Sarvadeva-s-Stuta, Saumya Surasura Namaskrita
Kaalratri Kaladhara, Roopa Saubhagya-daayini
Vaagdevi Cha Vararoha, Varahi Varijasana.

Chitrambara Chitragandha, Chitramalya Vibhushita
Kaanta Kaamprada Vandya, Vidyadhara supujita
Shvetamana Neelabhuja, Chaturvarga Phalaprada.

Chaturamana Samarajya, Raktamadhya Niranjana.

Hamsaasna Neeljangha, Brahma Vishnu Shivatmika
Aivum Saraswati Devya, Namnam Ashtottara Shastam
Iti Shri Saraswati shatanama Stotram Sampoornam

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DE – Raga CDs des Monats (01/2015): GNB – Der Prinz der südindischen Klassik (Teil 1 & 2).

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 19, 2015

Raga CDs des Monats: “Der Prinz der südindischen Klassik”
– eine musikalische Biographie von G.N. Balasubramaniam (1910-1965).

In Gudalur (Niligiris District / Tamil Nadu), in der Nähe von Mayiladuthurai (ehem. Mayavaram), erblickte G.N. Balasubramaniam das Licht der Welt. Das Kalenderblatt schrieb den 6. Januar 1910. GN Balasubramaniam, oder einfach nur GNB, wie er in Indien genannt wird, war ein Sänger der südindischen Klassik… und der erste Showstar. In die Musikgeschichte von Indien ging GNB ein als der “Prinz der karnatischen Musik”.

Dieser Ausnahmekünstler verstarb allzu früh, bereits im Alter von nur 55 Jahren, am 1. Mai 1965. Unsere heutige 2-stündige Sendung wollen wir ganz G.N. Balasubramaniam widmen, mit sehr seltenen, zum Teil nicht veröffentlichten Aufnahmen.

GNB schloss in Chennai sein Studium der englischen Literatur mit einem B.A. ab. Zu dieser Zeit belegte er neben seinem Studium an der Annamalai- Universität einige Musikkurse. Aus gesundheitlichen Gründen führte GNB diese musikalische Bildung nicht fort Später belegte er Meisterkurse an der Madras-Universität. Erst mit 18, im Jahre 1928 betrat GNB die Bühne. Seitdem war sein Aufstieg innerhalb der Musikszene der südindischen Klassik kometenhaft. GNB gehörte zu den progressivsten Interpreten seiner Zeit.

Sendetermine (Teil 1 und 2)…

19. Januar 2015 – 22:00-23:58 Uhr CET (4:00-5:58 pm EST) @ TIDE Radio (DE)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

GNB’s unorthodoxe Neugestaltung einer Aufführungspraxis der karnatischen Musik mit Elementen aus der nordindischen Klassik erklären wesentlich den kometenhaften Aufstieg von GNB… und daraus folgend seine Beliebtheit beim südindischen Publikum. – Und GNB’s Klarheit und Transparenz in Komposition und Interpretationsstil sicherte ihm als Lehrmeister den Zulauf einer Vielzahl von musikalischen Talenten. Viele von ihnen reiften in ihrer weiteren Musikerkarriere zu den großen Meistern der indischen Klassik heran. Dazu gehören Sänger wie Trichur V. Ramachandran (geb. 1940) aus Kerala oder die Sängerin Madras Lalitangi Vasanthakumari (1928-1990). MLV gehörte zu dem s.g. weiblichen Dreigestirn der südindischen Klassik (Trinity of Carnatic Music), neben DK Pattammal und MS Subbulakshmi.

Die Spezialität von GNB war es, innerhalb der kompositorischen Struktur mit ergänzenden Noten besondere Phrasierungsakzente zu setzen, um die Schönheit der kompositorischen Form zu betonen. Dieses stilistische Element ist als Chittaswaram benannt. Es hat seinen festen Platz zum Ende von Anupallavi oder Charanam, dem 2ten oder 3ten Vers. Dazu ein Übersetzungs- beispiel in Englischer Sprache der Thyagaraja-Komposition Raga Sudha Rasa:

Pallavi: raga sudha rasa panamu jesi rañjillave o manasa
The nectar like juice of melody sip. O my mind and joy therein, why don’t you find?

Anupallavi: yaga yoga tyaga bhoga phalamosan ge (raga)
Rites, Meditations, austerity and pleasure. In such music, do their fruits come together.

Charanam: sadasiva mayamagu nadon kara swara vidulu jivanmuktulani tyagaraju teliyu (raga)
That in which Sadashiva (= always pleasing) pervades unbound. The notes from Om the primordial sound. They that are versed in them, the art profound. To the cycle of life and death are no longer bound. This is a verity, this bard has found.

(Quelle: lyrical-thyagaraja.blogspot.de)

Diese Versformen Pallavi, Anupallavi und Charanam bilden die Struktur von Kompositionsformen wie den Keerthanam-s und Kriti-s. G.N.B. belebte das musikalische Repertoire der drei großen Komponisten der südindischen Klassik (trinity of carnatic music) wieder, besonders die von Tyagaraja (Kakaarla Tyagabrahmam, 04.05.1767-06.01.1847) und Muthuswami Dikshitar (24.03.1775-21.10.1835).

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DE – Raga CDs of the Month (01/2015): GNB – Prince of Carnatic Music (part 1 & 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 19, 2015

Raga CDs of the Month: “The Prince of South Indian classical music”
– a musical biography of G.N. Balasubramaniam (1910-1965).

In Gudalur (Niligiris District / Tamil Nadu), near Mayiladuthurai (formerly Mayavaram), GN Balasubramaniam was born on 6th January 1910. G.N. Balasubramaniam or just GNB, as he is called in India, was a singer of South Indian classics… and he was the first show star. In the history of Indian music GNB is remembered as the “Prince of Carnatic music“.

This exceptional artist died too early, at the age of only 55 years, on 1 May 1965. Today promotion initiative IMC – India meets Classic devote with a 2 hours radio program (part 1 and 2) to GN Balasubramaniam with some very rare, not yet published recordings.

GNB completed in Chennai with a degree (B.A.) in English literature. Beside his studies at that time he took some music courses at the Annamalai University. For health reasons GNB discontinued this musical education. Later he attended master classes at the University of Madras. At 18 (in 1928) GNB entered the stage. Since his rise in the music scene of Carnatic music had been meteoric. GNB was one of the most progressive artists of his time.

dates of broadcasting (part 1 and 2)…

19th January 2015  4:00-6:00 pm EST (10:00-11:58 pm CET) @ TIDE Radio (DE)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

GNB redesigned in an unorthodox manner the performance practice of Carnatic music with elements of North Indian Classics (Hindustani) which eplains his meteoric rise… and consequently his popularity within the South Indian audience. – And GNB’s clarity and transparency in the composition and performance style secured him as a teacher (guru) to guide a variety of musical talents. Many of them mature in their subsequent musical career up to extra ordinary masters of Indian classical music. E.g. Trichur V. Ramachandran (born 1940) from Kerala or the female singer Madras Lalitangi Vasanthakumari (1928-1990). MLV was one of the “female Trinity of Carnatic Music” alongside DK Pattammal and MS Subbulakshmi.

The specialty of GNB was set within the compositional structure with giving specific phrasing accents by additional notes to emphasize the beauty of the compositional form. This stylistic element is named as ‘Chittaswaram‘. It has its place at the end of Anupallavi or Charanam, the 2nd or 3rd verse. As an example here a translation for the Thyagaraja composition ‘Raga Sudha Rasa’:

Pallavi: raga sudha rasa panamu jesi rañjillave o manasa
The nectar like juice of melody sip. O my mind and joy therein, why don’t you find?

Anupallavi: yaga yoga tyaga bhoga phalamosan ge (raga)
Rites, Meditations, austerity and pleasure. In such music, do their fruits come together.

Charanam: sadasiva mayamagu nadon kara swara vidulu jivanmuktulani tyagaraju teliyu (raga)
That in which Sadashiva (= always pleasing) pervades unbound. The notes from Om the primordial sound. They that are versed in them, the art profound. To the cycle of life and death are no longer bound. This is a verity, this bard has found.

(Source: lyrical-thyagaraja.blogspot.de)

The verse forms Pallavi, Anupallavi and Charanam build the structure of compositional forms such as Keerthanam-s and Kriti-s. GNB revived the musical repertoire of the three great composers of the South Indian classical music (‘Trinity of Carnatic Music’), especially those of Tyagaraja (Kakaarla Tyagabrahmam, 05/04/1767-01/06/1847) and Muthuswami Dikshitar (03/24/1775-10/21/1835).

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DE – Raga CDs des Monats (01/2015): Pentatonische Ragas… 5-Ton-Skalen (Teil 1 & 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 18, 2015

Teil 1… (15:02-16:00 Uhr)

Raga Malkauns (Malkosh) - King of RagasDie pentatonischen Ragas (Notenskalen mit fünf Tönen) sind in Indien die am weitest verbreiteten Ragas, gleichermassen in der nordindischen (Hindustani) wie südindischen Musik (Carnatic). Sie schaffen ein vielschichtes, musikalisches Spektrum und sind für den Hörer einfach zu erkennen. Ihnen werden auch magische Kräfte zugeschrieben …

Das Notenmaterial wurde ursprünglich, wie in vielen Kulturen unserer Welt, für religiöse Zeremonien und Riten verwendet … sie bestanden zunächst aus nur zwei Tönen, entwickelten sich zu 3-Ton-Skalen und wurden im alten Griechenland zu 4-Ton-Skalen (Tetra-Chord-System).

Die differenziertere Skalierungsform der 5-Ton-Musik (s.g. Pentatonik) bildete sich besonders in Ost- und Südasien, allen voran in China, Japan und Indien. Auch im Blues und der afro-amerikanischen Musik findet das 5-Ton-Schema seine Anwendung.

Sendetermine…

18. Januar 2015 – 15:00-17:00 Uhr CET (09:00-11:00 am EST) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(Premiere: 25. Dezemger 2006 @ Tide Radio 96.0)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Teil 2… (16:02-17:00)

Raga mAlkauns (o. Malkosh) ist in der nordindischen Klassik (Hindustani) sehr beliebt. Im Süden Indiens (Carnatic) ist Malkauns als Ragam hindOLam bekannt. Der Raga mAlkauns ist ein 5-Ton-Raga mit einer 300-400-jährigen Geschichte und vielfältigen Entwicklung.

Die indische Klassik, zielt, anders als unsere westliche Musikkultur, durch ein improvisatorisches Spiel, auf dem Instrument oder im Gesang, auf ein atmosphärisches Klangbild, das sich mit bestimmten Gefühlen, Stimmungsbildern und einem emotionalen Ausdruck, den s.g. Rasa-s verbindet.

Der 5-Ton-Raga Malkauns beispielsweise portraitiert das Stimmungsbild des Dunklen, Geheimen und soll zu einer menthalen Stärkung verhelfen. Der Raga Durga trägt den Namen der ambivalenten, halbschrecklichen hindustischen Göttin Durga. Dem penthatonischen Raga Bhupali wird eine heilende, positive Wirkung zugesprochen, die den Zuhörer in eine leichte, freudvolle, entspannte Spannung versetzt.

Raga mAlkauns wird zur späten Abendstunde als Mitternachtsraga gespielt. Die Stimmung dieses majestätischen Ragas ist meditativ und introvertiert, seine Modalität einzigartig.
.
aufsteigende u. absteigende Skala von Raga mAlkauns (Bhairavi Thaat):
audav-audav | ‘n S g m d n S’ – S’ n d n d m g m g S ‘n S
Malkauns… King of Ragas
Ragam hindOLam (naTabhairavi): S G2 M1 D1 N2 S – S N2 D1 M1 G2 S
..
Von den indischen Musikmaestros werden diesem Raga übernatürliche Kräfte zugesprochen, mit dem sogar böse Geister vertrieben werden können. Der indische, in Bangalore lebende Author V. Murthy nennt mAlkauns gar “König der Ragas“.

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DE – Raga CDs of the Months (01/2015): Pentatonic Ragas… Five Tone Scales (part 1 & 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 18, 2015

part 1… (09:02-10:00 am)

Raga Malkauns (Malkosh) - King of RagasThe pentatonical ragas (scale of notes with five tones) are far common in India, equally in North Indian Classic (Hindustani) as in South Indian Music (Carnatic). The pentatonical ragas create a multi layered spectrum, a musical taste which can be regognized easily by the listeners. A magical power is being attributed to these ragas …

The material of notes originally was used for religious ceremonies and rites in many cultures all over the world… first it had consisted of only two tones, was developed to three tone scales and progressed in the antique Greece to a scale of four tones (tetra chord system).

A more differentiated scaling form of the five tone music (so called pentatonic) was formed particularly in East and South Asia, in front in China, Japan and India. Also in Blues and Afro American music the 5 tone scheme is in practice.

dates of broadcasting…

18th January 2015 – 09:00-11:00 am EST (03:00-05:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(premiere: 25th December 2006 @ Tide Radio 96.0)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

part 2… (10:02-11:00 am)

Raga mAlkauns (or Malkosh) is in North Indian Classical music (Hindustani) very popular with the audience and musicians. In the South of India Malkauns is well known as Ragam hindOLam (Carnatic Music). It is a 5 tone Raga with a 300 to 400 years old history and multivarious development.

Contrary to our western music culture the Indian Classical Music and the raga-s aim at an atmospheric sound picture by instrumental or vocal improvisation to connect with certain feelings, tendencyfully paintings conveying a special atmosphere and with emotional expressions.

The 5 tone raga Malkauns for example reflects a portrait of the dark, secret one and is helping to a menthal stabilization. The Raga Durga carries the names of the ambivalent, semi terrible hindustic goddess Durga. The penthatonic raga Bhupali is awarded a healing, positive effect, which shifts the listener into an easy, joyfully and relaxed tension.

Malkauns is played to the late evening hour as midnight raga. The tendency of this majestic Raga is meditative and introverted, it’s modality is unique.
.
ascending and descending scales of Raga mAlkauns (Bhairavi Thaat):
audav-audav | ‘n S g m d n S’ – S’ n d n d m g m g S ‘n S
Raga CDs des Monats (02/08): Malkauns… King of Ragas
Ragam hindOLam (Melakartha system No. 20: naTabhairavi): S G2 M1 D1 N2 S – S N2 D1 M1 G2 S
..

Indian music maestros award to this Raga supernatural forces. By Malkauns even bad spirit can be driven out. The Indian Author V. Murthy who is living in Bangalore calls mAlkauns “king of the Ragas“.

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DE – Raga CDs des Monats (01/2015): Rabindra Sangeet – Eine Stimme für Alle!

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 15, 2015

Rabindra Sangeet – Lieder von Tagore…

Als Rabindra Sangeet wird in Indien ein musikalisch-literarisches Konzept bezeichnet, das sich im 20. Jahrhundert als ein eigenständiges Genre etablierte. Darin ist die indisch klassische Musik eingebettet, gleichermassen die nordindische Klassik – Hindustani wie die Klassik Südindiens – die karnatische Musik.
Das Konzept wurde von dem indischen Universalgenie Rabindranath Tagore begründet. Im Englischen wird Rabindra Sangeet als „Tagore Songs“ – „Lieder von Tagore“ übersetzt.

200px-Tagore3

R. Tagore in Kolkata, c. 1915

Tagore’s Gesamtwerk umfasst aus einer etwa 60-jährigen Schaffenszeit bis zu seinem Tod im Jahre 1941 (7. Mai 1861 – 7. August 1941) mehr als 2200 Lieder, neben ca. 1000 Gedichten, zwei Dutzend Theaterstücken, Tanzdramen, acht Novellen, mehrere Ausgaben von Kurzgeschichten und vielfältige literarischen Werken mit sozialen, religiösen, politischen und erziehungswissenschaftlichen Essays und Beiträgen zu Filmwerken und als Maler.

Sendetermine…

15. Januar 2015 – 21:00 Uhr CET (03:00 pm EST) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(Premiere: 16.03.2009 – 22:00 Uhr @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Tagore war Würdenträger des Nobelpreises für Literatur und einziger Komponist zweiter Nationalhymnen, der von Indien („Jana Gana Mana“) und von Bangladesh („Amar Shonar Bangla“). Tagore wurde als erster Nicht-Europäer für sein Werk „Gitanjali“ mit Publikation im Jahre 1912 und 1913 in New York und London mit dem Nobelpreis für Literatur ausgezeichnet.

Gitanjali – in der Übersetzung „Ein Angebot an Liedern“ (Song Offerings) ist eine Sammlung von 103 englischen Gedichten. Ein Grossteil der Gedichte wurden von Rabindranath Tagore selbst übersetzt. Die frühe Ausgabe in bengalischer Sprache stammt aus dem Jahre 1910 (Git = Song + Anjoli = Offering).

Gitanjali, Vers 100:

Ever in my life have I sought thee with my songs. It was they who led me from door to door, and with them have I felt about me, searching and touching my world.

It was my songs that taught me all the lessons I ever learnt; they showed me secret paths, they brought before my sight many a star on the horizon of my heart.

They guided me all the day long to the mysteries of the country of pleasure and pain, and, at last, to what palace gate have they brought me in the evening at the end of my journey?

(PDF-Download | Source)

Die von Tagore begründete Universität Visva Bharati („Gemeinschaft der Welt mit Indien – Community of World with India) beherbergt eine Vielzahl von Instituten, u.a. das Sangit Bhavana (Institute of Dance, Drama and Music). Der erste Leiter war Dinendranath Tagore. Er lebte von 1882 bis 1935. Dinendranath  war der Neffe von Rabindranat Tagore – ein talentierter und herausragender Sänger in Baritonlage, der sich als künstlerischer Leiter von Rabindranath’s Theaterstücken und als Direkter der dramaturgischen Abteilung der Visva-Bharati Universität auszeichnete. Ihm sind mit Kenntnis der westlichen Notation die Niederschriften einer Vielzahl der Melodien von Rabindranath’s Kompositionen zu verdanken.

Die Abteilung „Musik“ (Music Board) der Visva-Bharati Universität, wurde drei Jahre nach dem Ableben von Tagore im Jahre 1944 errichtet. Heute ist sie mit der Ausrichtung von Tagore Festivals und mit Unterrichtsangeboten im Rabindra Sangeet in Kolkatta befasst.

Gandhi-TagoreTagore’s Erbe wird in Indien in Form von Tagore Festivals gefeiert, der alljährlichen Zeremonie von Kapipranam, Tagore’s Geburtstag am 07. Mai. Wallfahrten von Kolkatta nach Shantiniketan und feierliche Liederabende zu festlichen Anlässen sind in der bengalischen Kultur tief verwurzelt. Auch im Ausland wird der Geburtstag von Tagore gefeiert, mit dem jährlichen Tagore-Festival in Urbana (US-Bundesstaat Illinois). Dieses Festival konnte im Jahre 2008 sein 20-Jähriges Jubiläum feiern.

Mit dem Gedicht „Prosno“ in Bangla, der Muttersprache Tagores existiert eine der wenigen noch existierenden Aufnahmen. Sie ist nicht näher datiert. Tagore’s Stimme vermittelt uns die Klangästhetik und Metrik seiner Dichtkunst auf’s Trefflichste.

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DE – Raga CDs of the months (01/2015): Rabindra Sangeet – A Voice for All!

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 15, 2015

200px-Tagore3

R. Tagore in Kolkata, c. 1915

Rabindra Sangeet is in India a musical-literary concept, which has been established in the 20th century as an own genre. The Indian classical music is embedded in it, likewise the Northern Indian music – Hindustani – and the classical style of South India,  the carnatic music. The concept was created by India’s universal genius Rabindranath Tagore.

Tagore’s complete work covers a time period of 60 years till his death in 1941 (7th May 1861 – 7th August 1941) with approximately 1000 poems, two dozen plays, dance dramas, eight novellas, several expenditures of short stories and various literary works with social, religious, political and educational-scientific essays and contributions to film works and as painter.

date of broadcasting…

15th January 2015 – 03:00 pm EST (09:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(premiere: 16th March 2009 – 10:00 pm CET @ TIDE Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Tagore is the single composer of two national anthems, that of India („Jana Gana Mana“) and of Bangladesh („Amar Shonar Bangla“) and a dignitary Nobel prize for literature he received in 1913. Tagore was distinguished as first non European for his work „Gitanjali“ which was published in the year 1912 in New York and 1913 in London.

Gitanjali– transliteral means „an offer of songs“ (song offerings | Git = song + Anjoli = offering) – is a collection of 103 English poems. The majority of the poems were translated by Rabindranath Tagore himself. The early edition in Bengali language originates back to the year 1910.

Gitanjali, verse 100:

Ever in my life have I sought thee with my songs. It was they who led me from door to door, and with them have I felt about me, searching and touching my world.

It was my songs that taught me all the lessons I ever learnt; they showed me secret paths, they brought before my sight many a star on the horizon of my heart.

They guided me all the day long to the mysteries of the country of pleasure and pain, and, at last, to what palace gate have they brought me in the evening at the end of my journey?

(PDF-Download | Source)

The University Visva Bharati founded by R. Tagore accommodates today a multiplicity of institutes, among the Sangit Bhavana (institutes of Dance, Drama and Music). The first director was Tagore’s nephew Dinendranath Tagore. He lived from 1882 to 1935. Dinendranath was a talented and outstanding singer with Bariton voice, who can be characterized as an art director of Rabindranath’s plays and manager of the  dramaturgical department of the Visva Bhar ati University. We owe Rabindranath’s compositions documented in written form to Dinendranath’s knowledge of Western music notation.

The music department (music board) of the Visva Bharati University was established three years after Tagore’s demise in the year 1944. Today it is concerned with Tagore festivals and with educational lessons for Rabindra Sangeet in Kolkatta.

Gandhi-TagoreTagore’s heritance is celebrated in India with many Tagore festivals as the annual ceremony of Kapipranam, Tagore’s birthday on 7th May. Pilgrimages from Kolkatta to Shantiniketan and solemn song evenings to festive causes are deeply rooted in the Bengal culture. Abroad the birthday of Tagore is celebrated, e.g. with the annual Tagore-Festival in Urbana (US Federal State Illinois). This festival celebrated it’s 20th anniversary in the year 2008.

With the poem „Prosno“ in Bangla, the native language of Tagore is still existing one of the very few recordings of Tagore’s voice. Tagore’s voice arrange the sound aesthetics and metric of his lyrics applicably. This documentary is note dated exactelly.

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CH – Raga CDs of the Months (01/2015): 1000 x RAGAM (part 2 of 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 12, 2015

The main topic of IMC OnAir’s broadcasted in Switzerland (@ Radio RaSA and worldwide as webradio) for the first show in the new year 2015 is: “1000 x RAGAM – the relationship between North and South Indian Classics, part 2“.

dates of broadcasting…

part 1:  Monday, 22nd Dec 2014 – 04:00 pm EST (10:00 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
part 2:  Monday, 12th Jan 2015 – 04:00 pm EST (10:00 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(premiere broadcasting:  28th May 2007 / 5th June 2007 @ Tide 96.0 FM)
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With the past broadcastings (since start on 27th March 2006) IMC OnAir presented Indian Ragas as the basic form of North Indian Classic, the Hindustani music. Following a 24 hours time cyclus Indian ragas are played and listened at certain daily and night times or seasons allocated in the Thaat system of Vishnu Narayan Bhaktande, an Indian music scientist of the 19th century (1860-1936).

From ten main raga-s are derived all other raga forms, the females (ragini-s) and their sons (putra-s). For a comparison with the thaat system IMC OnAir’s radio show „1000 x RAGAMs“ will constrict onto the wide spread raga concept of South India, the >Melakarta system<.

The North Indian ragas are relocated in the South Indian Classic namely as ragam-s. The raga-s of North India (short form: raag-s) and the ragam-s of the South have many things in common. – And there are specifique developments which let exist these two music styles into our current times independently. – As a hypothetical factor for analysis of music theory exist substantial criterias going on to stage performance and instruments, used typically for the South Indian raga form by artists and composers.

Music-maestros-1000xRagam-part-1-and-2-2007-2

In our show “1000xRAGAM” (part 1 and 2) you can listen to examples of South Indian ragas, so called RAGAM-S on Indian and Western instruments, e.g. Veena, Nadaswaram, Mridangam and Ghatam (percussion), in Vocal style, e.g. kriti-s and the Violin.

  • Prof. K. Swaminathan (Veena) – Bhaavanjali and temple singing Geethanjali from Tamil Nadu, presented by Smt. MS Subbulakshmi and Kaavyanjali by Sri Muruganar.
  • Sudha Ragunathan (Vocals) – Ragam Varali of Papanasam Sivan’s VIRUTHAM KAAVAAVAA, Embar Kannan (Violin) and Skanda Subramanian (Mridangam).
  • Kiranavali Vidyasankar (Vocals) – Kriti: ‘Sri Matrubhutham’ – Matrubhuteswaraswamy, Misra Chapu Talam (composer: Muthuswamy Dikshitar) – Smt. Padma Shankar (Violin) and K.S. Nagarajan (Mridangam)
  • Sri Umayalpuram K. Sivaraman (Mridangam) – Rasika Ranjani Sabha (Trichy 1996 – live) – Sri Semmangudi Srinivasa Iyer (Vocals) and Sri Nagai Mulideran (Violin)
  • Sri Siva Vishnu temple (“live” recording of 2006): Raj(a)na Swaminathan (female Mridangam player) and the brothers Kasim & Babu (Nadaswaram duet), grandchild of the famous Nadaswaram player Sheikh Chinna Maulana Shahib

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CH – Raga CDs des Monats (01/2015): 1000 x RAGAM (T2 v. 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 12, 2015

Als Themenschwerpunkt in der Schweiz mit der ersten Sendung im neuen Jahr 2015 präsentiert IMC – India meets Classic: “1000 x RAGAM – die Beziehung zwischen der nord- und suedindischen Klassik, Teil 2“.

Wie in allen Sendungen „Raga-CDs des Monats” hoeren Sie Beispiele original indisch-klassischer Musik, gespielt von den renomiertesten Musikmeistern Indiens.

dates of broadcasting:

Teil 1:  Montag, 22. Dez. 2014 – 22:00-22:58 Uhr CET (04:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
Teil 2:  Montag, 12. Jan 2015 – 22:00-22:58 Uhr CET (04:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(Premiere:  28. Mai & 5. Juni 2007 @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

In den zurueckliegenden Sendungen (seit Sendestart am 27. Maerz 2006) hat IMC OnAir die indischen Ragas als die Grundform der nordindischen Klassik, der Hindustani-Musik vorgestellt. Im 24-Stunden-Zeitzyklus werden die Ragas zu bestimmten Tages- und Nachtzeiten, oder Jahreszeiten gespielt. Ihrer Zuordnung liegt das Thaatsystem zugrunde. – Von Vishnu Narayan Bhaktande, dem indischen Musikwissenschaftler des 19. Jahrhunderts (1860-1936).

Es sind 10 Hauptragas, aus denen alle anderen Ragaformen, die Ragini-s, die weibliche Form und ihre Soehne, die Putra-s abgeleitet werden koennen. Fuer einen Vergleich mit dem Thaatsystem wollen wir uns heute auf das in Suedindien weit verbreitete Ragakonzept, das „Melakarta-System” beschraenken.

Die Ragas finden sich in der suedindischen Klassik wieder … und werden dort als RAGAM bezeichnet. Die Ragas Nordindiens, oder Raags und die RAGAMS des Suedens haben viele Gemeinsamkeiten.

Es gibt auch besondere Auspraegungen, die bis in unsere heutige Zeit diese beiden Musikstile eigenstaendig bestehen lassen. – Im musiktheoretischen Ansatz existieren wesentliche Unterscheidungsmerkmale, auch im konzertanten Auffuehrungsstil bis hin zu den Instrumenten, die typischerweise in der suedindischen Ragaform, dem RAGAM von den Kuenstlern und den Komponisten verwendet werden.

Sie hoeren dazu Beispiele der suedindischen Ragas, den RAGAMS auf der Veena, dem Mridangam, im Gesangsstil Kriti, auf dem Nadaswaram und der Violine.

Music-maestros-1000xRagam-part-1-and-2-2007-2

  • Prof. K. Swaminathan (Veena) – Bhaavanjali und mit dem Tempelgesang Geethanjali aus Tamil Nadu von Smt. MS Subbulakshmi und einem Kaavyanjali von Sri Muruganar.
  • Sudha Ragunathan (Vokalistin) – Ragam Varali mit Papanasam Sivan’s VIRUTHAM KAAVAAVAA, Embar Kannan auf der Violine, das Mridangam spielt Skanda Subramanian.
  • Kiranavali Vidyasankar (Vokalistin) – Kriti: ‘Sri Matrubhutham’ – Matrubhuteswaraswamy, Misra Chapu Talam (Komponist: Muthuswamy Dikshitar) mit dem Violinisten Padma Sankar und K.S. Nagarajan auf dem Mridangam
  • Sri Umayalpuram K. Sivaraman (Mridangam) – Rasika Ranjani Sabha, Trichy 1996 (live), mit Sri Semmangudi Srinivasa Iyer: (Vokalist), Sri Nagai Mulideran (Violine)
  • Rajna (Mridangam-Spielerin) mit dem Nadaswaram-Duett Kasim & Babu, Brueder und Enkel des beruehmten Nadaswaram-Spielers Sheikh Chinna Maulana Sahib (Live-Aufnahme aus 2006, Sri Siva Vishnu Tempel)

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