IMC – India meets Classic presents …

… radio shows for Indian (Music) Culture

Archive for October 11th, 2014

A – Raga CDs of the Months (09-10/2014): Women in Indian Classics – Vocalists, Wind and String Instruments (part 1 & 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on October 11, 2014

The Indian Classical Music – epecially the North Indian Classics (Hindustani) – experienced a noticeable change. Before it had been a courtly art part of the activities of the courtesans (Tawaifs). Indian Classics developed in the 19th and 20th centuryto an appreciative art form, which is learned by young girls and women from respected families and practiced as occupation.

The Hindustani music particularly stood in the early Indian Middle ages under Persian influence. A Patronage at the court of the Mughals in the 16th century promised the courtly arts and artists prosperity. Many young girls were trained in performing arts, the Kathak dance and Indian Classical Music, literature with poetry forms like the Ghazals and Thumris.

The Thumri form is a genre of the light classical music, frequently sung at the spring fest and to the colors of Hori celebration. Originally the Thumri-s were expressing emotional expressions by gestures and facial expressions (mimics), so called Abhinaya. In the further development this presentation form disappeared and remained for Indian dance. The singers switched over to purely vocal improvisation forms without lyrics, the so-called Bol Banav-Ki Thumris.

On 29 August 2009 the documentary film „Rasoolan Bai – The other song“ (Das andere Lied) had its show case in the Bangalore Internationally Centre (Bangalore). Rasoolan Bay (1902-1974) from Varanasi formed together with Badi Moti Bay of Benares, Siddheswari Devi (1907-1976) and Begum Akthar (1914-1974) the quartet of the singing queens.

The rebel Gangubai Hangal (Gaanewali) had broken the gender-specific barriers in North Indian Classics. Gangubai is called „the father of the Khayals “, the modern vocal style of Hindustani music. When the singer Gangubai Hangal died in July 2009 at the age of 97 years after long illness critical voices had been heard which manifested that the era of the woman power in Indian classical music came to its end.

Rasoolan
Bai
Begum
Akthar
Badi
Moti Bai
Siddheswari
Devi
Gangubai
Hangal
Hangal with young daughter Krishna in the 1930s

.

In our Western understanding in India exist a transfigured woman picture of the eternally female divine: Already in the epical times no religious rituals were hold without participation of the women. With the Ashtanayikas, the eight heroins appear a woman picture till today we find in India.

In the South Indian Classics (Carnatic) the practice of the art was particularly reserved to the members of the Brahmins, a kind of priesthood. Women had it very difficult to attend the stage and appear with music in the public. In the beginnings of the phono industry women hardly found male companions for disc recordings.

Under the influence of the Hindu myths one can meet in Indian the opinion that the trinity of the goddesses, Durga, Lakshmi and Saraswati revealed themselfs to the humans as avatars in form of the singing virtuosos DK Pattammal (1919-2009), MS Subbalakshmi (1916-2004) and ML Vasanthakumari (1928 – 1990).

Their arrival terminated male dominance in South Indian classics. It began an era of the divine, creativity and innovation within the borders of traditional values.

They were artists, who completely got carried away in music, not because of success, fame or the money. These women were masters of multitasking, fulfilled various tasks in most different roles, as mothers, wives, sisters, teachers or grandmothers.

D.K. Pattammal
M.S. Subbalakshmi
M.L. Vasanthakumari

.

While today many artists seem to live most different identities at the same time, Pattammal, Subbalakshmi and Vasanthakumari were led only by one identity.

Typical for Asia the presence and function of a selfless, divine love (Bhakti) was for these mistresses their driving power, in order to overcome steadily largest social discrimination up to their artistic acknowledgment.

dates of broadcasting…

Serial No. 1:Women in Indian Classics – Vocalists
28th September 2014 – 05:00-05:58 pm EST (
11:00-11:58 pm CET) @ Radio FRO (A)
(premiere: 16th November 2009 @ Tide Radio)

Serial No. 2:Women in Indian Classics – Wind  & Sring Instrument
12th October 2014 – 05:00-05:58 pm EST (11:00-11:58 pm CET) @ Radio FRO (A)
(premiere: 24th August 2012 @ radio multicult.fm)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Rasoolan Bai

Rasoolan Bai (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In part 1 of our series “Women in Indian classical music” we have met the singing queens of India, like the vocalist from Varanasi Rasolan Bai (b. 1902). Her life moved again into the public consciousness with the documentary “Rasoolan Bai – The other Song” (2009) and thus of the Tawaifs, the courtesans. They practiced the arts in the courts of the maharajas till the 60s of 20th century. At the Moghul courts, rulers of Persia who occupied the north of India in the 14th to 16 century girls had been trained in the performing arts, as in Kathak, the North Indian dance, in Indian classical music and literature and poetry forms, such as Ghazals and Thumri-s.

Part 1 of “Women in Indian classical music” can be re-listened in our media archive in fully length simultaneously with re-reading of the moderation script (1:1 reprint).

English: Gangubai Hangal (1913-2009) and daugh...

English: Gangubai Hangal (1913-2009) and daughter Krishna (c. 1929-2004) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In southern India, however, the pursuit of the arts was reserved for members of the Brahmins, a priestly caste. The women had a hard time to perform with the arts in public. One of the first independent artists in South India was Nagaratnammal Bangalore (1878-1952). For her publishing of erotic literature written by the courtesan Muddu Palani she was front Indian Court in 1911.

In our recent time great singers like Dr. Gangubai Hangal (1912-2009) have broken the gender barrier and paved access for women to the workforce in Indian music.

But still the image of women is glorified. Thus, prominent singers like DK Pattammal, MS Subbalakshmi and ML Vasanthakumari are seen as avatars, as triumvirate of goddesses Durga, Lakshmi and Saraswati. This ‘Era of the Divine’ helped at least to break the male dominance in the South Indian classical music.

In the second part of our series “Women in Indian Classical Music” the promotion initiative IMC – India meets Classic presents female musicians of wind & string instruments. E.g. the Shehnai, Saxophone, Indian flute (Bansuri) and Indian lutes (called Veena-s) and Sarod, Surbahar (bass sitar) and Vichitra Veena.

f.l.t.r.:  Bageshwari Qamar – Shehnai, Sikkil Mala Chandrasekhar – Bansuri,
MS Subbalaxmi & MS Lavanya – Saxophon Sisters (Photo credit: intoday.in, esishya.com, carnatica.net)

f.l.t.r.: Annapurna Devi – Surbahar, Sharan Rani Backliwal (1929-2008) – Sarod, Dr. Radhika Umdekar Budhkar – Vichitra Veena
(Photo credit: Private collection of Mohan D. Nadkarni/Kamat’s Potpourri, TheHindu.com, indiatimes.com)

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

A – Raga CDs des Monats (09-10/2014): Frauen in der indisch klassischen Musik – Vokalistinnen, Blas- u. Seiteninstrumente (Teil 1 u. 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on October 11, 2014

Im 19./20. Jahrhundert hat die indisch klassische Musik, im Besonderen die nordindische Klassik (Hindustani) einen spürbaren Wandel erfahren. War sie als höfische Kunst der Arbeitsplatz der Kurtisanen (s.g. Tawaifs), hat sich die indische Klassik zu einer anerkannten Kunstform entwickelt, die von jungen Mädchen und Frauen aus angesehenen Familien erlernt und als Beruf ausgeübt wird.

Die Hindustani-Musik stand im frühen indischen Mittelalter besonders unter persischen Einfluss. Im 16. Jahrhundert versprach eine Patronage am Hofe der Großmogule den Kunstschaffenden und Artisten Wohlstand. Viele junge Mädchen wurden in den darstellenden Künsten ausgebildet. Dazu gehörten der Kathak-Tanz und die indische Klassik, die Literatur mit Poesieformen wie den Ghazals und Thumris.

Die Thumri-Form ist ein Genre der leichten Klassik, häufig zum Hori-Fest, dem Frühlingsfest der Farben gesungen. Ursprünglich wurden die Thumri-s mit viel emotionalem Ausdruck durch Gestiken und Gesichtsmimiken – Abhinaya – ausgedrückt. In der weiteren Entwicklung verschwand diese Darstellungsform, die dem indischen Tanz vorbehalten blieb. Die Sängerinnen wichen dafür auf rein stimmliche Improvisationsformen ohne Lyrik aus, die sogenannten Bol-Banav-Ki Thumris.

Am 29. August 2009 wurde der Dokumentarfilm „Rasoolan Bai – Das andere Lied“ (original: The other Song) im Bangalore International Centre (Bangalore) der Öffentlichkeit vorgestellt. Rasoolan Bai (1902-1974) aus Varanasi bildete zusammen mit Begum Akthar (1914-1974), Badi Moti Bai von Benares und Siddheswari Devi (1907-1976) das Quartett der Gesangsköniginnen.

Von dem Rebell Gangubai Hangal (Gaanewali) wurden die geschlechterspezifischen Barrieren in der nordindischen Klassik durchbrochen. Gangubai wird auch als der „Vater des Khayals“ bezeichnet, dem modernen Gesangsstil der Hindustani-Musik. Als die Sängerin Gangubai Hangal, im Alter von 97 Jahren, im Juli 2009 nach langer Krankheit verstarb, wurden Stimmen laut, die bekundeten, dass die Ära der Frauenpower in der indisch klassischen Musik zu Ende sei.

Rasoolan
Bai
Begum
Akthar
Badi
Moti Bai
Siddheswari
Devi
Gangubai
Hangal
Hangal with young daughter Krishna in the 1930s

.

Nach unserem westlichen Verständnis existiert auch ein verklärtes Frauenbild des ewig weiblich Göttlichen: Schon in der epischen Zeit gab es keine religiöse Handlung ohne Beteiligung der Frauen. Mit den Ashtanayikas, den acht Heroinnen zeigt sich ein Frauenbild, das wir noch heute in Indien antreffen.

In der südindischen Klassik (Carnatic) war die Ausübung der Kunst besonders den Mitgliedern der Brahmanen, eine Art Priesterschaft vorbehalten. Frauen hatten es schwer, auf die Bühne zu gelangen und sich mit ihrer Musik öffentlich zu zeigen. In den Anfängen der Phonoindustrie fanden Frauen für Schallplattenaufnahmen kaum männliche Begleiter.

Unter dem Einfluss der hinduistischen Mythen trifft man in Indian auf die Meinung, dass sich das Dreigestirn der Göttinen, Durga, Lakshmi und Saraswati den Menschen als Avatare in Gestalt der Gesangsvirtuosinnen DK Pattammal (1919-2009), MS Subbalakshmi (1916-2004) und ML Vasanthakumari (1928 – 1990) offenbarte.
Ihre Ankunft beendete die männliche Dominanz in der südindischen Klassik. Es begann eine Ära des Göttliche, der Kreativität und Innovation innerhalb der Grenzen traditioneller Werte.

Es waren Künstlerinnen, die ganz in der Musik aufgingen, nicht des Erfolges, noch des Ruhmes oder des Geldes wegen. Diese Frauen waren MeisterInnen des MultiTaskings, erfüllten vielerlei Aufgaben in unterschiedlichsten Rollen, als Mütter, Ehefrauen, Geschwister, Lehrer oder Grossmütter.

D.K. Pattammal
M.S. Subbalakshmi
M.L. Vasanthakumari

Während heute viele Künstler unterschiedlichste Identitäten gleichzeitig zu leben scheinen, waren Pattammal, Subbalakshmi und Vasanthakumari von einer einzigen Identität geleitet.

Die für Asien typische Präsenz und Funktion einer selbstlosen, göttlichen Liebe (Bhakti) war für diese Meisterinnen des Gesangs ihre Antriebskraft, um beständig auch grösste gesellschaftliche Widerstände bis zu ihrer künstlerischen Anerkennung zu überwinden.

Sendetermine…

Teil 1: 28. September 2014 – 23:00-23:58 Uhr (05:00-05:58 pm EST) @ Radio FRO (A)
(Premiere: 16. November 2009 @ Tide Radio)

Teil 2: 12. Oktober 2014 – 23:00-23:58 Uhr (05:00-05:58 pm EST) @ Radio FRO (A)
(Premiere (2-Stunden): 16. Sept 2012 @ radio multicult.fm)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Rasoolan Bai

Rasoolan Bai (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In Teil 1 unserer Serie „Frauen in der indisch-klassischen Musik“ haben wir die Gesangsköniginnen Indiens kennengelernt, wie die Sängerin Rasolan Bai aus Varanasi (geb. 1902). Ihr Leben rückte mit dem Dokumentarfilm „Rasoolan Bai – The other song“ im Jahre 2009 wieder ins Bewusstsein der Öffentlichkeit, und damit auch das der Tawaifs, der Kurtisanen. Sie übten die Künste an den Höfen der Maharajas bis in die 60er Jahre aus. Schon im 16. Jahrhundert wurden am Hofe der Moghuls, Herrscher aus Persien, die im 14. bis 16. Jahrhundert den Norden Indiens besetzten, Mädchen in den darstellenden Künsten ausgebildet, wie im Kathak, dem nordindischen Tanz, in der indischen Klassik oder Literatur und in Poesieformen, wie den Ghazals und Thumri-s.

Den ersten Teil von „Frauen in der indischen Klassik“ können Sie in unserem Medienarchiv nachhören und nachlesen (Moderationsskript im 1:1 reprint).

English: Gangubai Hangal (1913-2009) and daugh...

English: Gangubai Hangal (1913-2009) and daughter Krishna (c. 1929-2004) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Im Süden Indiens dagegen war die Ausübung der Künste den Mitgliedern der Brahmanen, eine Priesterkaste vorbehalten. Die Frauen hatten es schwer, mit Künsten in der Öffentlichkeit aufzutreten. Eine der ersten selbstständigen Künstlerinnen in Südindien war Bangalore Nagaratnammal (1878-1952). Für ihre Veröffentlichung von erotischer Literatur der Kurtisane Muddu Palani stand Nagaratnammal 1911 vor dem indischen Gerichtshof.

In unsere jüngste Zeit haben großartige Sängerinnen wie Dr. Gangubai Hangal (1912-2009) die geschlechterspezifischen Barrieren durchbrochen und Frauen den Zugang für eine Erwerbstätigkeit in der indischen Musik geebnet.

Doch noch immer ist das Frauenbild verklärt. So wurden herausragende Sängerinnen wie DK Pattammal, MS Subbalakshmi und ML Vasanthakumari als Avatare, als das Dreigestirn der Göttinnen Durga, Lakshmi und Saraswati gesehen. Diese Ära des Göttlichen verhalf zumindest, die männliche Dominanz in der südindischen Klassik zu durchbrechen.

Im zweiten Teil stellen wir Ihnen Musikerinnen auf Blas- und Saiteninstrumenten vor. Dazu gehören die Shehnai, das Saxophon, die indische Flöte (Bansuri) und indischen Lauten (s.g. Veena-s) wie die Sarod, Surbahar (Bass-Sitar) und Vichitra Veena.

 

v.l.n.r.: Bageshwari Qamar – Shehnai, Sikkil Mala Chandrasekhar – Bansuri,
MS Subbalaxmi & MS Lavanya – Saxophon-Duo (Photo credit: intoday.in, esishya.com, carnatica.net)

 

v.l.n.r.: Annapurna Devi – Surbahar, Sharan Rani Backliwal (1929-2008) – Sarod u. Dr. Radhika Umdekar Budhkar – Vichitra Veena
(Photo credit: Private collection of Mohan D. Nadkarni/Kamat’s Potpourri, TheHindu.com, indiatimes.com)

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: