IMC – India meets Classic presents …

… radio shows for Indian (Music) Culture

Archive for July, 2014

StudioTalk: “Music awareness by Love… from Love to Music” @ radio multicult.fm (Berlin)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 30, 2014

The special format “StudioTalk” offers to our listeners some very exclusive themes and talks about the world of Indian Classical Music ! – StudioTalk gives Indian music maestros, music scientists, event organisations and other specialists  the chance to present themselfs in a dialogue directly to an international and European audience.

A StudioTalk isn’t an interview form of 5 to 10 minutes small talk about concert tours, new editorials , CD or DVD projects etc. … Much more by a detailled planning and research work IMC OnAir delivers by StudioTalk a frame for specific themes and aspects to contribute an approach and deep going insight for Indian Classical Music – especially for the Europeans.

dates of broadcasting
31st July 2014 – 03:00-04:00 p.m. EST (09:00-10:00 p.m. MEST) @ radio multicult.fm (Berlin)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

StudioTalk “Music awareness by Love… from Love to Music” with
Sarod maestro Ranajit Sengupta “onair”… (100% in English

Ranajit Sengupta in our Hamburg Studio on May 12th 2007

Posted in IMC OnAir - News, StudioTalks, Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs of the Months (07/14): All Day Ragas

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 27, 2014

In different sources of literature the Ragas Pilu (o. Piloo), Kafi, Mand, Dhani or the Raga Bhairavi are listed as the so called >>all day ragas<< (notes: IMC OnAir already presented the Raga Bhairavi in on of its broadcasting shows: morning ragas).

date of broadcasting …

28th July 2014 – 10:00 pm CET (04:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA
(premiere: 22nd January 2007 @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Raga Pilu is a five tone raga, with a pentatonical scale (see broadcasting on 22nd August 2011) and Raga Kafi is a seven note raga (SA, Re, Ga, Ma, Pa, Dha, Ni and the SA on octave higher), a complete Raga, so called sanpoorna …

For the >>all day ragas<< it is characteristic to be assigned to the light classical period (Indian Light Classical Music). Apart from the instrumental music in Hindustani, in the North Indian Classical style, there exists the Indian Vocal Music.

Singing, the human voice, is the most prominent instrument of India. Here we also regain the form of the >>all day ragas<<. For example in the Thumri singing and Dadra, a nuance of the Thumri-s. The same as Raga Pilu and Kafi both Thumri and Dadra belong to the Light Indian Classical music. Thumri-s are used for the romantic expression.

Ali Akbar Khan
– CD Ali Akbar Khan (Sharod – Vol. 5)
(All India Radio Archival Release)
– CD Jugalbandi Ali Akbar Khan & Ravi Shankar
Ali Akbar Khan Ravi Shankar
(Sarod & Sitar Legends)
Smt. Shoba Shirodkar Gurtu
– CD Shobha Gurtu (Light Classical Vocal)
Saiyaan Nikas Gaye – Thumri,Dadra,Jhoola,Hori
Shobha GurtuUstad Sultan Khan
Sabir KhanPurushottam Walawalkar
(Vocal, Sarangi, Tabla, Harmonium)

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs des Monats (07/14): GANZTAGESRAGAS…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 27, 2014

IMC – India meets Classic präsentiert Ganztagesragas wie den Raga (Mishra) Pilu oder Raga Kafi – mit Hörbeispielen im indischen Gesang (Thumri – Hori), auf der Sarod, Sitar und Tabla …

In verschiedenen Literaturquellen werden die Ragas Pilu (o. Piloo), Kafi, Mand, Dhani oder der Raga Bhairavi als Ganztagesragas genannt. (Anm.: Den Raga Bhairavi stellte IMC OnAir in der Sendung „Morgenragas” vor.)

Raga Pilu ist ein 5-Ton-Raga, in einer pentatonischen Skala und Raga Kafi ein 7-Noten-Raga (Sa, Re, Ga, Ma, Pa, Dha, Ni und das um eine Oktave höher liegenden Sa), ein vollständiger Raga, sanpoorna …

Kennzeichnend für alle Ganztagesragas ist, dass sie der leichten Klassik (Indian Light Classical Music) zugeordnet werden.

Sendetermine…

28. Juli 2014 – 22:00-22:58 Uhr CET (04:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(Premiere: 22. Januar 2007 @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Neben der Instrumentalmusik in Hindustani, in der nordindischen Klassik, gibt es die indische Vokalmusik. Der Gesang, die menschliche Stimme, ist das führende Instrument Indiens. Auch hier finden wir die Form der Ganztagsragas wieder – wie beispielsweise im Thumri-Gesang und im Dadra, einer Nuancierung des Thumris gespielt. Thumri und Dadra gehören wie die Ragas Pilu und Kafi der leichten indischen Klassik an. Thumri-s werden für den romantischen Ausdruck verwendet.

IMC – India meets Classic präsentiert dazu die Königin der Thumris: Samanta Shobha Shirodkar Gurtu mit dem Gesangsbeispiel „Main To Kheloongi Un Sang Hori”, eine Hori-Komposition (Anm.: Hori-Kompositionen beschreiben den Spass und die Fröhlichkeit des farbenfrohen Holi-Festes (= indisches Frühlingsfest).) Shobha Gurtu wird begleitet von dem unvergleichlichen Purushottam Walawalkar auf dem Harmonium, Sultan Khan auf der Sarangi und Sabir Khan, Tabla.

Im Weiteren spielen die Sarod-Legende Ali Akbar Khan, als Solist und in einem Jugalbandi (indisches Duett) mit Pandit Ravi Shankar auf der Sitar. Ihn begleitet in einem weiterne Hörbeispiel der indische Johann Sebastian Bach, wie Allah Rakha von Sir Yehudin Menuhin bewundert genannt wurde. – Ein langjähriger Weggefährte von Shankar bei unzähligen Bühnenauftritten, u.a. das legendäre Woodstock-Festival in 1969.

Ali Akbar Khan
– CD Ali Akbar Khan (Sharod – Vol. 5)
(All India Radio Archival Release)
– CD Jugalbandi Ali Akbar Khan & Ravi Shankar
Ali Akbar Khan Ravi Shankar
(Sarod & Sitar Legends)
Smt. Shoba Shirodkar Gurtu
– CD Shobha Gurtu (Light Classical Vocal)
Saiyaan Nikas Gaye – Thumri,Dadra,Jhoola,Hori
Shobha GurtuUstad Sultan Khan
Sabir KhanPurushottam Walawalkar
(Vocal, Sarangi, Tabla, Harmonium)

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the Months (07/2014): 1000 x RAGAM (part 1 & 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 20, 2014

During the annually summer break of promotion initiative IMC – India meets Classic the main topic of IMC OnAir’s show being broadcasted for two ours via TIDE Radio (and worldwide as webradio) is set under the topic “1000 x RAGAM – the relationship between North and South Indian Classics“.

dates of broadcasting…

Monday, 21st July 2014 – 04:00-06:00 p.m. EST (10:00-11:58 pm CET) @ TIDE Radio (DE)
(premiere:  28th May & 5th June 2007 @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan
| streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

1000Ragam-Cover-No-12-250.gifWith the past broadcastings IMC OnAir presents Indian Ragas as the basic form of North Indian Classic, the Hindustani music. Following a 24 hours time cyclus Indian ragas are played and listened at certain daily and night times or seasons allocated in the Thaat system of Vishnu Narayan Bhaktande, an Indian music scientist of the 19th century (1860-1936).

From ten main raga-s are derived all other raga forms, the females (ragini-s) and their sons (putra-s). For a comparison with the thaat system IMC OnAir’s radio show „1000 x RAGAMs“ will constrict onto the wide spread raga concept of South India, the >Melakarta system<.

The North Indian ragas are relocated in the South Indian Classic namely as ragam-s. The raga-s of North India (short form: raag-s) and the ragam-s of the South have many things in common. – And there are specifique developments which let exist these two music styles into our current times independently. – As a hypothetical factor for analysis of music theory exist substantial criterias going on to stage performance and instruments, used typically for the South Indian raga form by artists and composers.

Music-maestros-1000xRagam-part-1-and-2-2007-2

In our show “1000xRAGAM” (part 1 and 2) you can listen to examples of South Indian ragas, so called RAGAM-S on Indian and Western instruments, e.g. Veena, Nadaswaram, Mridangam and Ghatam (percussion), in Vocal style, e.g. kriti-s and the Violin.

  • Prof. K. Swaminathan (Veena) – Bhaavanjali and temple singing Geethanjali from Tamil Nadu, presented by Smt. MS Subbulakshmi and Kaavyanjali by Sri Muruganar.
  • Sudha Ragunathan (Vocals) – Ragam Varali of Papanasam Sivan’s VIRUTHAM KAAVAAVAA, Embar Kannan (Violin) and Skanda Subramanian (Mridangam).
  • Kiranavali Vidyasankar (Vocals) – Kriti: ‘Sri Matrubhutham’ – Matrubhuteswaraswamy, Misra Chapu Talam (composer: Muthuswamy Dikshitar) – Smt. Padma Shankar (Violin) and K.S. Nagarajan (Mridangam)
  • Sri Umayalpuram K. Sivaraman (Mridangam) – Rasika Ranjani Sabha (Trichy 1996 – live) – Sri Semmangudi Srinivasa Iyer (Vocals) and Sri Nagai Mulideran (Violin)
  • Sri Siva Vishnu temple (“live” recording of 2006): Raj(a)na Swaminathan (female Mridangam player) and the brothers Kasim & Babu (Nadaswaram duet), grandchild of the famous Nadaswaram player Sheikh Chinna Maulana Shahib

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (07/2014): 1000 x RAGAM (Teil 1 u. 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 20, 2014

Der Themenschwerpunkt mit einer Wiederholungssendung auf Tide Radio während der jährlichen Sommerpause der Förderinitiative IMC – India meets Classic ist : “1000 x RAGAM – die Beziehung zwischen der nord- und suedindischen Klassik“. Wie in allen Sendungen „Raga-CDs des Monats” hoeren Sie Beispiele original indisch-klassischer Musik, gespielt von den renomiertesten Musikmeistern Indiens.

Sendetermine…

Teil 1 u. 2: 21. Juli  2013 – 22:00-23:58 Uhr CET (04:00-06:00 pm EST) @ TIDE Radio 96.0 (DE)
(Premiere:  28. Mai & 5. Juni 2007 @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

1000Ragam-Cover-No-12-250.gifIn den zurueckliegenden Sendungen hat IMC OnAir die indischen Ragas als die Grundform der nordindischen Klassik, der Hindustani-Musik vorgestellt. Im 24-Stunden-Zeitzyklus werden die Ragas zu bestimmten Tages- und Nachtzeiten, oder Jahreszeiten gespielt. Ihrer Zuordnung liegt das Thaatsystem zugrunde. – Von Vishnu Narayan Bhaktande, dem indischen Musikwissenschaftler des 19. Jahrhunderts (1860-1936).

Es sind 10 Hauptragas, aus denen alle anderen Ragaformen, die Ragini-s, die weibliche Form und ihre Soehne, die Putra-s abgeleitet werden koennen. Fuer einen Vergleich mit dem Thaatsystem wollen wir uns heute auf das in Suedindien weit verbreitete Ragakonzept, das „Melakarta-System” beschraenken.

Die Ragas finden sich in der suedindischen Klassik wieder … und werden dort als RAGAM bezeichnet. Die Ragas Nordindiens, oder Raags und die RAGAMS des Suedens haben viele Gemeinsamkeiten.

Es gibt auch besondere Auspraegungen, die bis in unsere heutige Zeit diese beiden Musikstile eigenstaendig bestehen lassen. – Im musiktheoretischen Ansatz existieren wesentliche Unterscheidungsmerkmale, auch im konzertanten Auffuehrungsstil bis hin zu den Instrumenten, die typischerweise in der suedindischen Ragaform, dem RAGAM von den Kuenstlern und den Komponisten verwendet werden.

Sie hoeren dazu Beispiele der suedindischen Ragas, den RAGAMS auf der Veena, dem Mridangam, im Gesangsstil Kriti, auf dem Nadaswaram und der Violine.

Music-maestros-1000xRagam-part-1-and-2-2007-2

  • Prof. K. Swaminathan (Veena) – Bhaavanjali und mit dem Tempelgesang Geethanjali aus Tamil Nadu von Smt. MS Subbulakshmi und einem Kaavyanjali von Sri Muruganar.
  • Sudha Ragunathan (Vokalistin) – Ragam Varali mit Papanasam Sivan’s VIRUTHAM KAAVAAVAA, Embar Kannan auf der Violine, das Mridangam spielt Skanda Subramanian.
  • Kiranavali Vidyasankar (Vokalistin) – Kriti: ‘Sri Matrubhutham’ – Matrubhuteswaraswamy, Misra Chapu Talam (Komponist: Muthuswamy Dikshitar) mit dem Violinisten Padma Sankar und K.S. Nagarajan auf dem Mridangam
  • Sri Umayalpuram K. Sivaraman (Mridangam) – Rasika Ranjani Sabha, Trichy 1996 (live), mit Sri Semmangudi Srinivasa Iyer: (Vokalist), Sri Nagai Mulideran (Violine)
  • Rajna (Mridangam-Spielerin) mit dem Nadaswaram-Duett Kasim & Babu, Brueder und Enkel des beruehmten Nadaswaram-Spielers Sheikh Chinna Maulana Sahib (Live-Aufnahme aus 2006, Sri Siva Vishnu Tempel)

 

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the Month (07/14): GNB – Prince of Carnatic Music (part 1 & 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 16, 2014

Raga CDs of the Month: “The Prince of South Indian classical music” 
– a musical biography of G.N. Balasubramaniam (1910-1965).

In Gudalur (Niligiris District / Tamil Nadu), near Mayiladuthurai (formerly Mayavaram), GN Balasubramaniam was born on 6th January 1910. G.N. Balasubramaniam or just GNB, as he is called in India, was a singer of South Indian classics… and he was the first show star. In the history of Indian music GNB is remembered as the “Prince of Carnatic music“.

This exceptional artist died too early, at the age of only 55 years, on 1 May 1965. Today promotion initiative IMC – India meets Classic devote with a 2 hours radio program (part 1 and 2) to GN Balasubramaniam with some very rare, not yet published recordings.

GNB completed in Chennai with a degree (B.A.) in English literature. Beside his studies at that time he took some music courses at the Annamalai University. For health reasons GNB discontinued this musical education. Later he attended master classes at the University of Madras. At 18 (in 1928) GNB entered the stage. Since his rise in the music scene of Carnatic music had been meteoric. GNB was one of the most progressive artists of his time.

dates of broadcasting – part 1

3rd July 2014 – 3-4:00 pm  EST  (9-10:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
9th March 2014 – 05:00 pm  EST  (11:00 pm CET) @ Radio FRO (A)
24th Febr 2014 – 04:00 pm EST (10:00 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

dates of broadcasting – part 2

17th July 2014  3-4:00 pm EST (9-10:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
23rd March 2014 – 05:00 pm EST (11:00 pm CET) @ Radio FRO (A)
10th March 2014 – 04:00 pm  EST  (10:00 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

GNB redesigned in an unorthodox manner the performance practice of Carnatic music with elements of North Indian Classics (Hindustani) which eplains his meteoric rise… and consequently his popularity within the South Indian audience. – And GNB’s clarity and transparency in the composition and performance style secured him as a teacher (guru) to guide a variety of musical talents. Many of them mature in their subsequent musical career up to extra ordinary masters of Indian classical music. E.g. Trichur V. Ramachandran (born 1940) from Kerala or the female singer Madras Lalitangi Vasanthakumari (1928-1990). MLV was one of the “female Trinity of Carnatic Music” alongside DK Pattammal and MS Subbulakshmi.

The specialty of GNB was set within the compositional structure with giving specific phrasing accents by additional notes to emphasize the beauty of the compositional form. This stylistic element is named as ‘Chittaswaram‘. It has its place at the end of Anupallavi or Charanam, the 2nd or 3rd verse. As an example here a translation for the Thyagaraja composition ‘Raga Sudha Rasa’:

Pallavi: raga sudha rasa panamu jesi rañjillave o manasa
The nectar like juice of melody sip. O my mind and joy therein, why don’t you find?

Anupallavi: yaga yoga tyaga bhoga phalamosan ge (raga)
Rites, Meditations, austerity and pleasure. In such music, do their fruits come together.

Charanam: sadasiva mayamagu nadon kara swara vidulu jivanmuktulani tyagaraju teliyu (raga)
That in which Sadashiva (= always pleasing) pervades unbound. The notes from Om the primordial sound. They that are versed in them, the art profound. To the cycle of life and death are no longer bound. This is a verity, this bard has found.

(Source: lyrical-thyagaraja.blogspot.de)

The verse forms Pallavi, Anupallavi and Charanam build the structure of compositional forms such as Keerthanam-s and Kriti-s. GNB revived the musical repertoire of the three great composers of the South Indian classical music (‘Trinity of Carnatic Music’), especially those of Tyagaraja (Kakaarla Tyagabrahmam, 05/04/1767-01/06/1847) and Muthuswami Dikshitar (03/24/1775-10/21/1835).

+++

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (07/14): GNB – Der Prinz der südindischen Klassik (Teil 1 u. 2).

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 16, 2014

Raga CDs des Monats: “Der Prinz der südindischen Klassik”
– eine musikalische Biographie von G.N. Balasubramaniam (1910-1965).

In Gudalur (Niligiris District / Tamil Nadu), in der Nähe von Mayiladuthurai (ehem. Mayavaram), erblickte G.N. Balasubramaniam das Licht der Welt. Das Kalenderblatt schrieb den 6. Januar 1910. GN Balasubramaniam, oder einfach nur GNB, wie er in Indien genannt wird, war ein Sänger der südindischen Klassik… und der erste Showstar. In die Musikgeschichte von Indien ging GNB ein als der “Prinz der karnatischen Musik”.

Dieser Ausnahmekünstler verstarb allzu früh, bereits im Alter von nur 55 Jahren, am 1. Mai 1965. Unsere heutige 2-stündige Sendung wollen wir ganz G.N. Balasubramaniam widmen, mit sehr seltenen, zum Teil nicht veröffentlichten Aufnahmen.

GNB schloss in Chennai sein Studium der englischen Literatur mit einem B.A. ab. Zu dieser Zeit belegte er neben seinem Studium an der Annamalai- Universität einige Musikkurse. Aus gesundheitlichen Gründen führte GNB diese musikalische Bildung nicht fort Später belegte er Meisterkurse an der Madras-Universität. Erst mit 18, im Jahre 1928 betrat GNB die Bühne. Seitdem war sein Aufstieg innerhalb der Musikszene der südindischen Klassik kometenhaft. GNB gehörte zu den progressivsten Interpreten seiner Zeit.

Sendetermine von Teil 1

3. Juli 2014 – 21-22:00 Uhr CET (3:00 pm EST) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
9. März 2014 – 23-24:00 Uhr CET (5:00 pm EST) @ Radio FRO (A)
23. Februar 2014 – 22-23:00 Uhr CET (4:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Sendetermine von Teil 2

17. Juli 2014 – 21-22:00 Uhr CET (3:00 pm EST) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
23. März 2014 – 23-24:00 Uhr CET (5:00 pm EST) @ Radio FRO (A)
9. März 2014 – 23-24:00 Uhr CET (5:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (
CH)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

GNB’s unorthodoxe Neugestaltung einer Aufführungspraxis der karnatischen Musik mit Elementen aus der nordindischen Klassik erklären wesentlich den kometenhaften Aufstieg von GNB… und daraus folgend seine Beliebtheit beim südindischen Publikum. – Und GNB’s Klarheit und Transparenz in Komposition und Interpretationsstil sicherte ihm als Lehrmeister den Zulauf einer Vielzahl von musikalischen Talenten. Viele von ihnen reiften in ihrer weiteren Musikerkarriere zu den großen Meistern der indischen Klassik heran. Dazu gehören Sänger wie Trichur V. Ramachandran (geb. 1940) aus Kerala oder die Sängerin Madras Lalitangi Vasanthakumari (1928-1990). MLV gehörte zu dem s.g. weiblichen Dreigestirn der südindischen Klassik (Trinity of Carnatic Music), neben DK Pattammal und MS Subbulakshmi.

Die Spezialität von GNB war es, innerhalb der kompositorischen Struktur mit ergänzenden Noten besondere Phrasierungsakzente zu setzen, um die Schönheit der kompositorischen Form zu betonen. Dieses stilistische Element ist als Chittaswaram benannt. Es hat seinen festen Platz zum Ende von Anupallavi oder Charanam, dem 2ten oder 3ten Vers. Dazu ein Übersetzungs- beispiel in Englischer Sprache der Thyagaraja-Komposition Raga Sudha Rasa:

Pallavi: raga sudha rasa panamu jesi rañjillave o manasa
The nectar like juice of melody sip. O my mind and joy therein, why don’t you find?

Anupallavi: yaga yoga tyaga bhoga phalamosan ge (raga)
Rites, Meditations, austerity and pleasure. In such music, do their fruits come together.

Charanam: sadasiva mayamagu nadon kara swara vidulu jivanmuktulani tyagaraju teliyu (raga)
That in which Sadashiva (= always pleasing) pervades unbound. The notes from Om the primordial sound. They that are versed in them, the art profound. To the cycle of life and death are no longer bound. This is a verity, this bard has found.

(Quelle: lyrical-thyagaraja.blogspot.de)

Diese Versformen Pallavi, Anupallavi und Charanam bilden die Struktur von Kompositionsformen wie den Keerthanam-s und Kriti-s. G.N.B. belebte das musikalische Repertoire der drei großen Komponisten der südindischen Klassik (trinity of carnatic music) wieder, besonders die von Tyagaraja (Kakaarla Tyagabrahmam, 04.05.1767-06.01.1847) und Muthuswami Dikshitar (24.03.1775-21.10.1835).

+++

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs des Monats (06-07/2014): Frauen in der indisch klassischen Musik – Vokalistinnen, Blas- u. Seiteninstrumente (Teil 2/2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 13, 2014

Im 19./20. Jahrhundert hat die indisch klassische Musik, im Besonderen die nordindische Klassik (Hindustani) einen spürbaren Wandel erfahren. War sie als höfische Kunst der Arbeitsplatz der Kurtisanen (s.g. Tawaifs), hat sich die indische Klassik zu einer anerkannten Kunstform entwickelt, die von jungen Mädchen und Frauen aus angesehenen Familien erlernt und als Beruf ausgeübt wird.

Die Hindustani-Musik stand im frühen indischen Mittelalter besonders unter persischen Einfluss. Im 16. Jahrhundert versprach eine Patronage am Hofe der Großmogule den Kunstschaffenden und Artisten Wohlstand. Viele junge Mädchen wurden in den darstellenden Künsten ausgebildet. Dazu gehörten der Kathak-Tanz und die indische Klassik, die Literatur mit Poesieformen wie den Ghazals und Thumris.

Die Thumri-Form ist ein Genre der leichten Klassik, häufig zum Hori-Fest, dem Frühlingsfest der Farben gesungen. Ursprünglich wurden die Thumri-s mit viel emotionalem Ausdruck durch Gestiken und Gesichtsmimiken – Abhinaya – ausgedrückt. In der weiteren Entwicklung verschwand diese Darstellungsform, die dem indischen Tanz vorbehalten blieb. Die Sängerinnen wichen dafür auf rein stimmliche Improvisationsformen ohne Lyrik aus, die sogenannten Bol-Banav-Ki Thumris.

Am 29. August 2009 wurde der Dokumentarfilm „Rasoolan Bai – Das andere Lied“ (original: The other Song) im Bangalore International Centre (Bangalore) der Öffentlichkeit vorgestellt. Rasoolan Bai (1902-1974) aus Varanasi bildete zusammen mit Begum Akthar (1914-1974), Badi Moti Bai von Benares und Siddheswari Devi (1907-1976) das Quartett der Gesangsköniginnen.

Von dem Rebell Gangubai Hangal (Gaanewali) wurden die geschlechterspezifischen Barrieren in der nordindischen Klassik durchbrochen. Gangubai wird auch als der „Vater des Khayals“ bezeichnet, dem modernen Gesangsstil der Hindustani-Musik. Als die Sängerin Gangubai Hangal, im Alter von 97 Jahren, im Juli 2009 nach langer Krankheit verstarb, wurden Stimmen laut, die bekundeten, dass die Ära der Frauenpower in der indisch klassischen Musik zu Ende sei.

Rasoolan
Bai
Begum
Akthar
Badi
Moti Bai
Siddheswari
Devi
Gangubai
Hangal
Hangal with young daughter Krishna in the 1930s

.

Nach unserem westlichen Verständnis existiert auch ein verklärtes Frauenbild des ewig weiblich Göttlichen: Schon in der epischen Zeit gab es keine religiöse Handlung ohne Beteiligung der Frauen. Mit den Ashtanayikas, den acht Heroinnen zeigt sich ein Frauenbild, das wir noch heute in Indien antreffen.

In der südindischen Klassik (Carnatic) war die Ausübung der Kunst besonders den Mitgliedern der Brahmanen, eine Art Priesterschaft vorbehalten. Frauen hatten es schwer, auf die Bühne zu gelangen und sich mit ihrer Musik öffentlich zu zeigen. In den Anfängen der Phonoindustrie fanden Frauen für Schallplattenaufnahmen kaum männliche Begleiter.

Unter dem Einfluss der hinduistischen Mythen trifft man in Indian auf die Meinung, dass sich das Dreigestirn der Göttinen, Durga, Lakshmi und Saraswati den Menschen als Avatare in Gestalt der Gesangsvirtuosinnen DK Pattammal (1919-2009), MS Subbalakshmi (1916-2004) und ML Vasanthakumari (1928 – 1990) offenbarte.
Ihre Ankunft beendete die männliche Dominanz in der südindischen Klassik. Es begann eine Ära des Göttliche, der Kreativität und Innovation innerhalb der Grenzen traditioneller Werte.

Es waren Künstlerinnen, die ganz in der Musik aufgingen, nicht des Erfolges, noch des Ruhmes oder des Geldes wegen. Diese Frauen waren MeisterInnen des MultiTaskings, erfüllten vielerlei Aufgaben in unterschiedlichsten Rollen, als Mütter, Ehefrauen, Geschwister, Lehrer oder Grossmütter.

D.K. Pattammal
M.S. Subbalakshmi
M.L. Vasanthakumari

Während heute viele Künstler unterschiedlichste Identitäten gleichzeitig zu leben scheinen, waren Pattammal, Subbalakshmi und Vasanthakumari von einer einzigen Identität geleitet.

Die für Asien typische Präsenz und Funktion einer selbstlosen, göttlichen Liebe (Bhakti) war für diese Meisterinnen des Gesangs ihre Antriebskraft, um beständig auch grösste gesellschaftliche Widerstände bis zu ihrer künstlerischen Anerkennung zu überwinden.

Sendetermine…

Teil 1: 23. Juni 2014 – 22:00-22:58 Uhr (04:00-04:58 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(Premiere: 16. November 2009 @ Tide Radio)

Teil 2: 14. Juli 2014 – 22:00-22:58 Uhr (04:00-04:58 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(Premiere (2-Stunden): 16. Sept 2012 @ radio multicult.fm)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Rasoolan Bai

Rasoolan Bai (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In Teil 1 unserer Serie „Frauen in der indisch-klassischen Musik“ haben wir die Gesangsköniginnen Indiens kennengelernt, wie die Sängerin Rasolan Bai aus Varanasi (geb. 1902). Ihr Leben rückte mit dem Dokumentarfilm „Rasoolan Bai – The other song“ im Jahre 2009 wieder ins Bewusstsein der Öffentlichkeit, und damit auch das der Tawaifs, der Kurtisanen. Sie übten die Künste an den Höfen der Maharajas bis in die 60er Jahre aus. Schon im 16. Jahrhundert wurden am Hofe der Moghuls, Herrscher aus Persien, die im 14. bis 16. Jahrhundert den Norden Indiens besetzten, Mädchen in den darstellenden Künsten ausgebildet, wie im Kathak, dem nordindischen Tanz, in der indischen Klassik oder Literatur und in Poesieformen, wie den Ghazals und Thumri-s.

Den ersten Teil von „Frauen in der indischen Klassik“ können Sie in unserem Medienarchiv nachhören und nachlesen (Moderationsskript im 1:1 reprint).

English: Gangubai Hangal (1913-2009) and daugh...

English: Gangubai Hangal (1913-2009) and daughter Krishna (c. 1929-2004) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Im Süden Indiens dagegen war die Ausübung der Künste den Mitgliedern der Brahmanen, eine Priesterkaste vorbehalten. Die Frauen hatten es schwer, mit Künsten in der Öffentlichkeit aufzutreten. Eine der ersten selbstständigen Künstlerinnen in Südindien war Bangalore Nagaratnammal (1878-1952). Für ihre Veröffentlichung von erotischer Literatur der Kurtisane Muddu Palani stand Nagaratnammal 1911 vor dem indischen Gerichtshof.

In unsere jüngste Zeit haben großartige Sängerinnen wie Dr. Gangubai Hangal (1912-2009) die geschlechterspezifischen Barrieren durchbrochen und Frauen den Zugang für eine Erwerbstätigkeit in der indischen Musik geebnet.

Doch noch immer ist das Frauenbild verklärt. So wurden herausragende Sängerinnen wie DK Pattammal, MS Subbalakshmi und ML Vasanthakumari als Avatare, als das Dreigestirn der Göttinnen Durga, Lakshmi und Saraswati gesehen. Diese Ära des Göttlichen verhalf zumindest, die männliche Dominanz in der südindischen Klassik zu durchbrechen.

Im zweiten Teil stellen wir Ihnen Musikerinnen auf Blas- und Saiteninstrumenten vor. Dazu gehören die Shehnai, das Saxophon, die indische Flöte (Bansuri) und indischen Lauten (s.g. Veena-s) wie die Sarod, Surbahar (Bass-Sitar) und Vichitra Veena.

 

v.l.n.r.: Bageshwari Qamar – Shehnai, Sikkil Mala Chandrasekhar – Bansuri,
MS Subbalaxmi & MS Lavanya – Saxophon-Duo (Photo credit: intoday.in, esishya.com, carnatica.net)

 

v.l.n.r.: Annapurna Devi – Surbahar, Sharan Rani Backliwal (1929-2008) – Sarod u. Dr. Radhika Umdekar Budhkar – Vichitra Veena
(Photo credit: Private collection of Mohan D. Nadkarni/Kamat’s Potpourri, TheHindu.com, indiatimes.com)

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs of the Months (06-07/2014): Women in Indian Classics – Vocalists, Wind and String Instruments (part 2/2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 13, 2014

The Indian Classical Music – epecially the North Indian Classics (Hindustani) – experienced a noticeable change. Before it had been a courtly art part of the activities of the courtesans (Tawaifs). Indian Classics developed in the 19th and 20th centuryto an appreciative art form, which is learned by young girls and women from respected families and practiced as occupation.

The Hindustani music particularly stood in the early Indian Middle ages under Persian influence. A Patronage at the court of the Mughals in the 16th century promised the courtly arts and artists prosperity. Many young girls were trained in performing arts, the Kathak dance and Indian Classical Music, literature with poetry forms like the Ghazals and Thumris.

The Thumri form is a genre of the light classical music, frequently sung at the spring fest and to the colors of Hori celebration. Originally the Thumri-s were expressing emotional expressions by gestures and facial expressions (mimics), so called Abhinaya. In the further development this presentation form disappeared and remained for Indian dance. The singers switched over to purely vocal improvisation forms without lyrics, the so-called Bol Banav-Ki Thumris.

On 29 August 2009 the documentary film „Rasoolan Bai – The other song“ (Das andere Lied) had its show case in the Bangalore Internationally Centre (Bangalore). Rasoolan Bay (1902-1974) from Varanasi formed together with Badi Moti Bay of Benares, Siddheswari Devi (1907-1976) and Begum Akthar (1914-1974) the quartet of the singing queens.

The rebel Gangubai Hangal (Gaanewali) had broken the gender-specific barriers in North Indian Classics. Gangubai is called „the father of the Khayals “, the modern vocal style of Hindustani music. When the singer Gangubai Hangal died in July 2009 at the age of 97 years after long illness critical voices had been heard which manifested that the era of the woman power in Indian classical music came to its end.

Rasoolan
Bai
Begum
Akthar
Badi
Moti Bai
Siddheswari
Devi
Gangubai
Hangal
Hangal with young daughter Krishna in the 1930s

.

In our Western understanding in India exist a transfigured woman picture of the eternally female divine: Already in the epical times no religious rituals were hold without participation of the women. With the Ashtanayikas, the eight heroins appear a woman picture till today we find in India.

In the South Indian Classics (Carnatic) the practice of the art was particularly reserved to the members of the Brahmins, a kind of priesthood. Women had it very difficult to attend the stage and appear with music in the public. In the beginnings of the phono industry women hardly found male companions for disc recordings.

Under the influence of the Hindu myths one can meet in Indian the opinion that the trinity of the goddesses, Durga, Lakshmi and Saraswati revealed themselfs to the humans as avatars in form of the singing virtuosos DK Pattammal (1919-2009), MS Subbalakshmi (1916-2004) and ML Vasanthakumari (1928 – 1990).

Their arrival terminated male dominance in South Indian classics. It began an era of the divine, creativity and innovation within the borders of traditional values.

They were artists, who completely got carried away in music, not because of success, fame or the money. These women were masters of multitasking, fulfilled various tasks in most different roles, as mothers, wives, sisters, teachers or grandmothers.

D.K. Pattammal
M.S. Subbalakshmi
M.L. Vasanthakumari

.

While today many artists seem to live most different identities at the same time, Pattammal, Subbalakshmi and Vasanthakumari were led only by one identity.

Typical for Asia the presence and function of a selfless, divine love (Bhakti) was for these mistresses their driving power, in order to overcome steadily largest social discrimination up to their artistic acknowledgment.

dates of broadcasting…

Serial No. 1:Women in Indian Classics – Vocalists
23rd June 2014 – 04:00-05:00 p.m. EST (10:00-11:00 p.m. CET) @ Radio RaSA (
CH
)
(premiere: 16th November 2009 @ Tide Radio)

Serial No. 2:Women in Indian Classics – Wind  & Sring Instrument
14th July 2014 – 04:00-05:00 p.m. EST (10:00-11:00 p.m. CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(premiere: 24th August 2012 @ radio multicult.fm)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Rasoolan Bai

Rasoolan Bai (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In part 1 of our series “Women in Indian classical music” we have met the singing queens of India, like the vocalist from Varanasi Rasolan Bai (b. 1902). Her life moved again into the public consciousness with the documentary “Rasoolan Bai – The other Song” (2009) and thus of the Tawaifs, the courtesans. They practiced the arts in the courts of the maharajas till the 60s of 20th century. At the Moghul courts, rulers of Persia who occupied the north of India in the 14th to 16 century girls had been trained in the performing arts, as in Kathak, the North Indian dance, in Indian classical music and literature and poetry forms, such as Ghazals and Thumri-s.

Part 1 of “Women in Indian classical music” can be re-listened in our media archive in fully length simultaneously with re-reading of the moderation script (1:1 reprint).

English: Gangubai Hangal (1913-2009) and daugh...

English: Gangubai Hangal (1913-2009) and daughter Krishna (c. 1929-2004) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In southern India, however, the pursuit of the arts was reserved for members of the Brahmins, a priestly caste. The women had a hard time to perform with the arts in public. One of the first independent artists in South India was Nagaratnammal Bangalore (1878-1952). For her publishing of erotic literature written by the courtesan Muddu Palani she was front Indian Court in 1911.

In our recent time great singers like Dr. Gangubai Hangal (1912-2009) have broken the gender barrier and paved access for women to the workforce in Indian music.

But still the image of women is glorified. Thus, prominent singers like DK Pattammal, MS Subbalakshmi and ML Vasanthakumari are seen as avatars, as triumvirate of goddesses Durga, Lakshmi and Saraswati. This ‘Era of the Divine’ helped at least to break the male dominance in the South Indian classical music.

In the second part of our series “Women in Indian Classical Music” the promotion initiative IMC – India meets Classic presents female musicians of wind & string instruments. E.g. the Shehnai, Saxophone, Indian flute (Bansuri) and Indian lutes (called Veena-s) and Sarod, Surbahar (bass sitar) and Vichitra Veena.

f.l.t.r.:  Bageshwari Qamar – Shehnai, Sikkil Mala Chandrasekhar – Bansuri,
MS Subbalaxmi & MS Lavanya – Saxophon Sisters (Photo credit: intoday.in, esishya.com, carnatica.net)

f.l.t.r.: Annapurna Devi – Surbahar, Sharan Rani Backliwal (1929-2008) – Sarod, Dr. Radhika Umdekar Budhkar – Vichitra Veena
(Photo credit: Private collection of Mohan D. Nadkarni/Kamat’s Potpourri, TheHindu.com, indiatimes.com)

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

A – Raga CDs des Monats (06-07/2014): ANGA – Ortsbestimmung eines Ragas (Teil 2/2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 12, 2014

Die Förderinitiative IMC – India meets Classic präsentiert seinem monatlichen Format zur indisch-klassischen Musik, das seit 2012 auch in Österreich auf Radio FRO (und als webstream) ausgestrahlt wird – monatlich jeden 2. und 4. Montag um 22:00-22:58 Uhr. Das Thema heute: “ANGA – Ortsbestimmung eines Ragas“.

In einer unserer früheren Sendungen befassten wir uns mit der Ornamentik der Ragas: “Alankaras – die 10 Typen einer Ragaornamentik “. Die Alankara-s sind der Kern für die Entfaltung und Schönheit eines Ragas. Während in der modernen Klassik des Westens die Ornamentik der Ausschmückung der Melodielinie dient, improvisiert ein indischer Musikmaestro mit den Verzierungen eines Ragas. Dabei fliessen die Noten, die Swara-s ineinander, in einer ständigen Verknüpfung. Diese Art von Glissando ist als der Alankartyp Meend bekannt. Die ältesten Schriftdokumente mit Beschreibung von 33 Alankara-s werden auf 100-200 Jahre vor Christi Geburt zurückdatiert, wie dem Natya Shastra des Weisen Bharata. Im 17. Jahrhundert beschreibt das Sangeet Parijat von Ahobal 63 bzw. 68 Typen von Alankaras. Noch bis vor ca. 100-150 Jahre entstand Shabdalankar als die jüngste Klassifizierung.

Sendetermine…

Teil 1: 22. Juni 2014 – 23:00-23:58 Uhr CET (05:00-05:58 pm EST) @ Radio FRO (A)
Teil 2: 13. Juli 2014 – 2300-23:58 Uhr CET (
05:00-05:58 pm EST) @ Radio FRO (A)
(Premiere: 15. Juli 2012 – 15:00-17:00 Uhr CET @ radio multicult.fm)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Weitere Klassifizierungskriterien für die Kennung der Ragas sind die s.g. Pakad-s. Der Begriff Pakad beschreibt die Kennung einer Ragaskala. Pakad sollte nicht mit dem deutschen Musikbegriff Leitmotiv (guiding motif) oder (melodische) Phrasierung verwechselt werden.

Raag Deepak, in Ragamala by Sahibdin 1605.

Raag Deepak, in Ragamala by Sahibdin 1605 (source: Wikipedia.org)

Die Pakad-s beschreiben Kennungsmuster und hervorstechenden Merkmale der einzelnen Ragaformen. Diese Grammatik dient in der indischen Klassik Nord- und Südindiens weniger der technischen Ausführung, viel mehr ist sie eine ästhetische Beschreibung, so wie eine Ragaperformance immer nur einem einzigen emotionalen Ausdruck dient. Dazu verweisen wir auf unserer Sendung “Nava Rasa-s – die 9 Stimmungsbilder der Ragas” in unserem Medienarchiv unter www.imcradio.net/onlinearchiv.

Zum Pakad zählt auch Anga. Funktional ist Anga die Ortsbestimmung eines Ragas. In der Übersetzung bedeutet Anga: Ein Teil eines Ganzen. In der indischen Klassik wird der uns bekannte Oktavraum mit sieben (7) Hauptnoten in zwei Segmente aufgeteilt, zwei Angas. Es sind ein tieferliegender, vom Grundton ausgehenden Tetrachord* ( = poorvanga)… und ein darüberliegender Tetrachord (= uttaranga) jeweils mit drei kleinen Tonintervallen.
———————————–
*) Ganz allgemein besteht ein Tetrachord aus vier (4) Noten. Dieser Begriff leitet sich aus dem Griechischen ab. In der Wortbedeutung heisst Tetrachord einfach vier (4) Saiten… und nimmt damit Bezug auf die im antiken Griechenland gespielten, harfenähnlichen Instrumente. Die Zwischenräume eines Tetrachords werden von drei Intervallen gebildet. In einer Ragaskala sind dies für den tieferliegenden Tetrachord aus den ersten vier Hauptnoten: Sa-Re, Re-Gha und Gha-Ma. In der westlichen Klassik entspricht er: C-D auf der 1. und 2. Stufe, D-E auf der 2. und 3. und E-F auf der 3. und 4. Stufe. Der darüberliegende, zweite TetraChord beginnt auf der 5. Stufe Pa, dem G. Die folgenden drei (3) kleinen Intervalle sind: Pa-Dha, Dha-Ni und Ni-Sa’, entsprechend: G-A, A-H und H-C, dem eingestrichenen C, um eine Oktave höherliegend als der Grundton.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News, Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: