IMC – India meets Classic presents …

… radio shows for Indian (Music) Culture

  • Blog Categories

  • |Hamburg Airport|

    Click for Hamburg Airport, Germany Forecast
  • From 2005 to NOW

    June 2014
    M T W T F S S
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    30  
  • Archives perMonth

  • Dates of Broadcasting

  • Share with music lovers…

  • IMCOnAir|FairRadio

  • 2nd radio show…

  • Read for you…

    The chief editor has read this for you...
  • Follow it!

Archive for June, 2014

DE – Raga CDs of the Month (06/2014): From Hawaii to South Asia – The Indian Classical Guitar (short version)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 18, 2014

The promotion initiative IMC – India meets Classic presents the show “Raga CDs of the Month” with the topic “From Hawaii to South Asia – The Indian Classical Guitar“.

With the IMC programme in recent years (since 2006…) for Indian classical music we experienced instruments that come from the West ( see http://www.imcradio.net/archives ). Like the violin in the South Indian classical music, the hand-operated harmonium as an accompanying instrument and successor of the Sarangi (Indian fiddle) or the saxophone, as we know it from Jazz and the mandolin, a double-string instrument from Italy.
There are many reasons that explain the arrival of Western instruments in the collective of traditional Indian wind, string and percussion instruments. There existed the military orchestras of the British Empire, French missionaries in the 19th century, the chapels of the Maharajas or film scores from Mumbai as the Bollywood capital. The sound of these new instruments inspired musicians to experiment. With structural changes and special playing techniques they adapted to the particular interpretations and Indian style of Ragas and Ragams (North and South Indian classics).

dates of broadcasting…

19th June 2014– 03:00 p.m. EST (09:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(Premiere: 25th May 2012 – 09:00 -11:00 pm CET @ radio multicult.fm)
InternetStream (Web & Mobile Radio) | PodCasting | broadcasting plan

The so called slide bar defines the height of the guitar tone by sliding on the free-swinging strings a lot more using a piece of iron, rather than to shorten or to extend by tapping the frets (on the guitar keyboard). Beside their own creations of slide bars there are various forms, materials and colours on the market. Until the 80s manufacturers experimented with new materials. Glas or pyrex, inorganic cobalt oxid, bone or porcelain can produce different timbres of sound.

different models of Indian Classical Guitars (Slide guitars) …

(from let to right: Hansa Veena, Chaturangi, Shankar Guitar, Mohan Veena, Swar Veena)

History conveys that in 1931 a young Hawaiians came to India with his guitar in the luggage. Tau Moe was his name. The importance of Tau Moe for the Indian slide guitar made him well known in India, more as in his homeland. First musicians in Indian West Bengal played songs on the Hawaiian guitar, performing compositions from the repertoire of the first Indian Nobel laureate Tagore Rabindranat (Rec.: With these lyrics and melodies of Tagore a separate vocal genre developed as ‘Rabindra Sangeet’).

In addition to introducing the Hawaiian guitar and playing techniques of by Tao Moe there exist another version of narration. It is said that Gabriel Davion introduced in India to play the guitar with a steel bar. Gabriel Davion was a sailor of Indian descent. He was allegedly abducted by Portuguese sailors in 1876 to Hawaii. Gabriel Davion had oriented himself probably to the slide technique of the Vichitra Vina and Gotuvadyam, two Indian instruments (lutes). Since the 11th century the slide technique is known in India.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (06/2014): Von Hawaii nach Südasien – Die indisch-klassische Gitarre (Kurzfassung)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 18, 2014

Die Förderinitiative IMC – India meets Classic präsentiert Ihnen in der Sendung “Raga CDs des Monats” das Thema “Von Hawaii nach Südasien – Die indisch-klassische Gitarre“.

In dem Programmverlauf der letzten Jahre (2006-2014) zur indisch-klassischen Musik haben wir Instrumente kennengelernt, die aus dem Westen stammen (s. http://www.imcradio.net/archive ). Wie die Violine in der südindischen Klassik, das handbetriebene Harmonium als Begleitinstrument und Nachfolger der Sarangi, der indischen Fiddel – oder das Saxophon, wie wir es aus dem Jazz kennen und die Mandoline, ein doppelsaitiges Instrument aus Italien. Es gibt verschiedensten Gründe, die den Einzug der westlicher Instrumente erklären in das Sammelsurium der traditionell-indischen Blas-, Saiten- und Percussioninstrumente.
Da waren die Militärorchester des Britisch Empire, französische Missionare im 19. Jahrhundert, die Hofkapellen der Maharajas oder Filmmusiken aus Mumbai, der Bollywoodhauptstadt. Der Klang dieser neuen Instrumente inspirierte Musiker, zu experimentieren. Mit baulichen Veränderungen und besonderen Spieltechnicken adaptierte man sie für die besonderen Interpretationsstile der Ragas und Ragams in der nord- und südindischen Klassik.

Sendetermin…

19. Juni 2014 – 21:00 Uhr MEST (03:00 pm EST) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(Premiere: 25. Mai 2012 – 21:00 -23:00 pm CET @ radio multicult.fm (Berlin))
InternetStream (Web & Mobile Radio) | PodCasting | broadcasting plan

Mit der s.g. slide bar wird die Höhe des Gitarrentons definiert durch das Abgreifen, oder viel mehr durch das Gleiten mit einem Eisenstück über die freischwingenden Saiten, anstatt sie durch das Abgreifen an den Gitarrenbünden (frets) zu verkürzen oder zu verlängern. Neben Eigenanfertigungen gibt es auf dem Markt unterschiedlichste Aufführungen von slide bars in Form, Materialien und Farbe. Noch bis in die 80er Jahre experimentierten Hersteller mit neuen Materialien. Aus Glas oder Pyrex, aus anorganischem Kobaldoxid bis zu Knochen oder Porzellan können verschiedenste Klangfarben erzeugt werden.

Verschiedene Modelle der indisch-klassischen Gitarre (Slide-Gitarre)…

(v.l.n.r.: Hansa Veena, Chaturangi, Shankar-Gitarre, Mohan Veena, Swar Veena)

Die Geschichte überliefert, dass im Jahre 1931 ein junger Hawaianer nach Indien kam, mit seiner Gitarre im Gepäck. Tau Moe war sein Name. Die Bedeutung von Tau Moe für die indische Slide-Gitarre hat ihn in Indien bekannter werden lassen, als in seiner Heimat. Zuallererst wurden auf der Hawaii-Gitarre Lieder im indischen West-Bengal gespielt. Es waren Kompositionen aus dem Repertoire des ersten indischen Literaturnobelpreisträgers Rabindranat Tagore. Mit diesem Liedgut hat sich bis heute ein eigenes Gesangsgenre entwickelt, der Rabindra Sangeet.

Neben der Einführung und Spieltechnik der Hawaii-Gitarre durch Tao Moe gibt es eine weitere Version. Es wird erzählt, dass Gabriel Davion das Gitarrenspiel mit einer Steelbar in Indien einführte. Gabriel Davion war ein Seemann indischer Abstammung. Er soll von portugiesischen Seglern im Jahre 1876 nach Hawaii verschleppt worden sein. Gabriel Davion hat sich wohl für die Slide-Technik auch an Instrumenten orientiert: an der Vichitra Vina und dem Gotuvadyam, zwei indische Lauten. Bereits seit dem 11. Jahrhundert kennt man in Indien die Slidetechnik.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the months (06/2014): Ragamala-s – Miniature Paintings (part 1 and 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 15, 2014

R A G A M A L A (part 1 & 2)
poetry – picture – music … the spoken image of raga paintings.

Beside extraordinary music compositions of North Indian Classic (Hindustani) and South Indian music (Carnatic) the art work on the sub continent is documented by impressive palaces and monumental painting e.g. the frescos from the cave temples of Ajanta, dated back to the 2nd till 1st century. A unique painting art had been developed, too. The hand writing illumination and the Indian miniature paintings, the so called >raga mala-s< were established correlating with the Indian music and corresponding with the raga form directly.

dates of broadcasting…

Monday,  16th June 2014 (part 1 and 2) – 4:00-5:58 pm EST (10:00- 11:58 pm CET) @ TIDE Radio (DE)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Many hundred of years before the >raga mala-s< each raga got its counterpart by a ragini, the female form of a raga, basically male and a form of psyche (rupa). Rupa manifestates itself in two different profiles. By the music scientists of India they have been differentiated as nadamaya-rupa, the pure sound structure of melodies and devatamaya-rupa, the hidden prototype of the devine wisdom. The Indian miniature paintings belong to the second category. They shall awake in the viewers mind and his imagination a kind of „harmony, corresponding with the picture motives. Painted ragas work similar as a Yantra to realise a spiritual status, comparable with the results of Yoga exercises.

Ragini Kamodini Raga Lalita Ragini Danashre Raga Hindol
Indian miniature paintings ragamala-s

In its origin meaning the painting art of miniatures have a religious character. The performance get an illustration of handwritings, less to express the enjoy of art than more to aquire religious earnings.

The music inspired Indian miniature paintings are unique, a complex form of art, nowhere else in any art form of the world to be met. They had their bloom time around the regency of Akbar, one of four rulers of the Moghul time beside Jehangir, Shah Jehan and Aurangzeb, who all have been very important for India. The Mughul style of the raga mala-s is dated between 1556 and 1605.

The period of this kind of painting ended in 1658. Future generations owe to the miniature painting a demonstration with all details of the religious, spiritual and materialistic cultures of that time. Very late the meaning of the illustrations as a music inspired painting has been understood very late. The manuscript of Kalpasutra (Jinacaritra) became public in 1956. It is dated to the end of the 15th century.

The IMC broadcasting show „RAGAMALA … poetry – painting – music … the spoken image of raga paintings is referring to the Western painting style. The Eastern one expired in India when the Bhuddism was destroyed by the Islamic conquest of North India in the 13th century … and survived only in some few schools for painting in Nepal and Tibet.

Whats the interesting aspect of these little formats nowadays ? – As a first impression of Indian miniature paintings, most viewer from Western world experience the raga mala-s with a kind of strangeness. The beauty is locked at first sight by a specific code. For the modern man of the 21st century raga mala-s are fascinating by their shining colours, presented strictly seperated from each other. Red, blue, white, green and black occur mainly.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (06/14): RAGAMALA-S – Miniaturmalereien (Teil 1 u. 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 15, 2014

 

R A G A M A L A (Teil 1 u. 2)
Gedicht – Bild – Musik … das gesprochene Bild der Raga-Malerei.

Neben den herausragenden Musikkompositionen der nordindischen (Hindustani) Klassik wie südindischen, karnatischen Musik, zeigt sich die künstlerische Schaffenskraft des indischen Subkontinents in imponierenden Palastanlagen und Monumentalmalereien wie in den Höhlentempeln von Ajanta. Sie können bis auf das 2.-1. Jh. v. Chr. zurückdatiert werden. Daneben hat sich eine einzigartige Malkunst, die Handschriftenilluminiation und die indische Miniaturmalerei, die >raga mala< etabliert. Sie korreliert mit der indischen Musik und der Ragaform unmittelbar …

Bereits viele Jahrhunderte vor den >raga mala-s< wurden jedem Raga und Ragini, der weiblichen Form eines Ragas, eine psychische Form (Rupa) zugesprochen. Sie manifestiert sich in zwei Ausprägungen. Die indischen Musiktheoretiker haben die blosse Klangform der Melodien, nadamaya-rupa, unterschieden von den dahinter, im Verborgenen liegenden Urbildern der göttlichen Weisheit – devatamaya-rupa. Die indischen Minitarumalereien fallen in die zweite Kategorie. Sie sollen beim Betrachter in der gedanklichen Vorstellung „Harmonien” wecken, die mit dem, was gesehen wird, korrespondieren. Der gemalte Raga funktioniert ähnlich einem Yantra, um den spirituellen Zustand zu realisieren, wie er durch das Yoga erreicht werden kann.

Sendetermine …

Montag, 16. Juni 2014 (Teil 1 u. 2) – 22:00-24:00 Uhr (CET) @ TIDE Radio (DE)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

In ihrem ursprünglichen Sinne spricht man der Miniaturmalkunst einen religiösen Charakter zu. Die Bilddarstellungen wurden mit Handschriften illustriert, weniger der Freude an der Kunst als um religiöse Verdienste zu erwerben.

Die musik-inspirierten indischen Miniaturmalereien sind einzigartig, eine komplexe Kunstform, wie sie in keiner anderen Kultur unserer Welt anzutreffen ist … Sie erlebten ihre Blütezeit unter der Regentschaft von Akbar, einem der vier für Indien besonders bedeutsamen Moghul-Herrschern, neben Jehangir, Shah Jehan und Aurangzeb. Der Mughul-Stil wird datiert zwischen 1556 bis 1605.

Die Zeit der Bildermalerei ging 1658 zu Ende. Die Nachwelt verdankt der Miniaturmalerei eine bis in alle Einzelheiten gehende bildliche Schilderung der damaligen geistigen und materiellen Kultur. Relativ spät hat man die Bedeutung der Illustrationen und ihre Beziehung im Sinne einer musik-inspirierten Malerei verstehen können. Das Manuskript des Kalpasutra (Jinacaritra) wurde erst 1956 einer breiteren Öffentlichkeit bekannt. Es kann auf das Ende des 15. Jahrhunderts datiert werden.

Ragini Kamodini Raga Lalita Ragini Danashre Raga Hindol
Indische Miniaturmalereien – Ragamalas

Die IMC-Sendung „RAGAMALA … Gedicht – Bild – Musik … das gesprochene Bild der Raga-Malerei” (Teil 1 & 2) beschränkt sich auf den westlichen Malstil. Der Östliche ist in Indien mit der Vernichtung des Buddhismus durch die islamische Eroberung Nordindiens im 13. Jahrhundert erloschen … und lebte nur noch in wenigen Malschulen in Nepal und Tibet fort.

Worin liegt der Reiz der Kleinformate, der indischen Minitaturmalerei, der raga mala-s ? – Für die meisten Betrachter aus dem Westens wirken die indischen Miniaturmalereien zunächst fremd. Ihre Schönheit verschliesst sich uns auf den ersten Blick durch eine spezielle Codierung. Für den modernen Betrachter des 21. Jahrhunderts liegt ihre Faszination vor allem in den leuchtenden, scharf nebeneinandergestellten Farben. Rot, Blau, Weiss, Grün und Schwarz kommen hauptsächlich vor.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

Sarode maestro Pt. Kamal Mallick is no more…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 14, 2014

06142014/HH – Already on 17th April 2014 the worrying news reached us, that sarode maestro Pandit Kamal Mallick (Kolkata) has been hospitalized. He has got admission in Calcautta Heart clinic and research Centre. It has been detected that Pt. Kamal Mallick has been affected with cancer in Pancreas. It was supposed that an immediate operation should follow within 2-3 days. Kamal has already been acute financial hardshipped due to his son Chandan Mallick’s treatment who has been successful kidney transplanted few months ago.

Last night (on 13th June) Kamal Mallick passed away at his Howrah residence. Our thoughts are with his son Chandan (himself a sarode player) and our condolences go to  his family and close friends. – R.I.P.

small_Kamal_MallickSarode maestro Pandit Kamal Mallick of the Maihar gharana was initiated by the late Sangeetacharya Shyam Gangopadhyay. His training was later supplemented by the masterly touch of the doyen of the gharana, Ustad Ali Akbar Khan. His gayaki talim was to a great extent, reinforced by renowned khayal singer Pandit Narayan Rao Joshi of the Kirana Gharana.

A senior performer of All India Radio and Doordarshan, he has been a regular concert performer for many decades, performing at such prestigious venues as Hafiz Aki Khan Society`s Festival of Sarode in Delhi, Ravi Shankar Institute of Music and Performing Arts of Varanasi, Jadubhatta Sangeet Sammelan, Sadarang Sangeet Sammelan, Tansen Sangeet Sammelan, Dover Lane Music Conference and many others in Kolkata and other parts of India. He has also extensively toured Africa and Europe, with several CDs having been released by `Sanskritik` (London).

He has worked with the renowned filmmaker Satyajit Ray, to evolve the background music of films like Shatranj ke Khilari, Joy Baba Felunath and Hirak Rajar Deshe. Purnendu Patri and Goutam Ghose have also used his music in their films Chhera Tamsuk and Antarjali Yatra respectively.

Simple and unassuming, Pandit Kamal Mallick has been a passionate sarode performer, relentlessly working towards the enrichment of this instrument. His tuneful strokes, layakari, complete dedication and sheer devotion to music have all combined together to give his music a rare dimension that captives the hearts of his audience. As a teacher he was proud to have guided many celebrity performers all over the country and abroad (source: ITCSRA – Artist of the Month).

Kamal Mallick at Dover Lane Music Conference…

+++

Posted in IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the Months (06/14): “NATYA – the relevance of Ragas for Indian Dance & Theatre” (part 1 & 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 14, 2014

In performing arts of India the term “Natya” means a combination of movements, mimics (mostly facial expressions), costumes, human psychology and “great stories“. The Indian dance is in it’s traditional form till today “stories telling”.
..
The Indian theatre was subordinated to a paradigm shift same as the raga-s under Muslim rulership and Persian influences: it progressed from temple rites to courtly entertainment for art lovers.
.
Originally the storytellers, the Kathaks – according to the name for their dance form, the Kathak – tramped in Northern India as nomadic bards from village to village. In the temple plants the Kathaks played myths and instructive stories from old writings. The costumes and topic tables of these subjects in India’s traditional dancing forms often appear as motives in the miniature paintings, the so called Ragamala-s of the Mughal period (pictures see “instruments” & “scenes of art“).
.
Indian dance dramas – Bharata Naatya Sampradaya
Bharata Naatya Sampradaya… RAM (2004, The Hindu) Dance Drama Goddess Durga (The Hindu, 2004) Mythological Themes - Krishna (The Hindu, 2004)
from left to right: RAM | dance drama Goddess Durga | mythologic themes “Krishna”
source: The Hindu, 2004
The classical role of dance in India had developed very early. Dances were the component of religious rites. The dancers admired the Gods by “telling” stories from their life and their heroic deeds.
.
In Western world today “Bharata Natyam” is well-known, as one of the four main forms of Indian dances, energetically and with extremely precise, balanced motion-sequences.
.
dates of broadcasting…

 
part 1: 15th June 2014 – 09:02-10:00 am EST (15:02-16:00 pm CET) @ radio multiciult.fm (DE)
 part 2: 15th June 2014 – 10:02-11:00 am EST (16:02-17:00 pm CET) @ radio multiciult.fm (DE)
(premiere: 1st April & 6th May 2008 – 09:00 pm CET @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

However Bharata Natyam does not mean “Indian dance”, a widespread misbelieve. This term (after Purandara Dasa (14884-1564)) embodies the three living forms of Indian dance:

  • Bha or Bhava, the expression,
  • Ra for Raga or melody and
  • Ta for Tala, the rhythm (rhythmic circles).
India’s outstanding BharataNatyam dancers…

Priyadarshini Govind (Hinduonnet, 2004) Maitreyi Sarma and Ananda Shankar - MUM’S The Word (Hinduonnet, 2005) Geeta Chandran (Hinduonnet, 2005) Dr. Srekala Bharath (Hinduonnet, 2008)

from left to right: Priyadarhini Govind | MaitreyiSarma & Dr. Ananda Shankar Jayant | Geeta Chandran | Dr. Srekala Bharath
source: Hinduonnet, 2004 (Avinash Pasricha), 2005 (K. Gajendran, R. Shivaji Rao), 2008 (V. Ganesan)
The term Raag (= “tonal colouring”) for the first time appears in the Natya Shastra (4th century BC – 2nd century AC), a handbook for dramaturgy written by the mythic Brahman Bharata Muni, a priest and sage. The seven (7) main notes (sapta svaras), those one also today are used for the Raga interpretation are connected with different mind affections (emotions = Rasa-s). In the Natya Sastra also music instruments and their handling are described. It proves four categories: lutes (tata), flutes (Sushira), cymbals (Ghana) and drums (avanadha)..
.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (06/14): NATYA… die Bedeutung der Ragas im indischen Tanz & Theater (Teil 1 u. 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 14, 2014

In den darstellenden Künsten Indiens ist Natya eine Kombination aus Bewegungen, Mimik, Kostümen, menschlicher Psychologie und grossartigen Geschichten. Der indische Tanz ist in seiner traditionellen Form bis heute “Geschichtenerzählen”.
.
Das indische Theater war wie die Ragas unter der muslimischen Herrschaft und dem persischen Einfluss einem Paradigmenwechsel unterworfen. Aus Tempelriten wurde höfische Unterhaltung für Kunstliebhaber.
.
Ursprünglich zogen die Geschichtenerzähler, die Kathaks – entsprechend die Bezeichnung für ihre Tanzform, dem Kathak – als nomadisierende Barden von Dorf zu Dorf durch das nördliche Indien. Die Kathaks spielten in den Tempelanlagen Mythen und lehrreiche Geschichten aus den alten Schriften. Die Kostüme und thematischen Gegenstände dieser Tanzform findet sich oft in denen der Miniaturmalereien, den Ragamala-s der Mughalperiode (Bilder s. “Instrumente” & “Darstellung von Kunstszenen“) wieder.
.
Indische Tanzdramen – Bharata Naatya Sampradaya
Bharata Naatya Sampradaya… RAM (2004, The Hindu) Dance Drama Goddess Durga (The Hindu, 2004) Mythological Themes - Krishna (The Hindu, 2004)
v.l.n.r.: RAM | Tanzdrama Gottheit Durga | Mythologische Themen “Krishna” (Quelle: The Hindu, 2004)
Die Rolle des klassisch Tanzes in Indien hatte sich bereits sehr früh entwickelt. Tänze waren Bestandteil religiöser Riten. Die Tänzer verehrten die Götter, in denen sie Geschichten aus ihrem Leben und ihren Taten erzählten.Im Westen ist heute meist Bharata Natyam bekannt, als einer der vier Hauptformen aller indischen Tänze, energetisch und mit äusserst präzisen, ausbalancierten Bewegungsabläufen.
.
Sendetermine…

Teil 1: 15.06.2014 15:02-16:00 Uhr(METZ) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
Teil 2: 15.06.2014 16:02-17:00 Uhr METZ) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(Premiere: 01.04.2008 / 06.05.2008 – 21:00-21:58 Uhr (METZ) @ Tide 96.0 FM))
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast 

.
Bharata Natyam selbst bedeutet aber nicht “indischer Tanz”, ein weitverbreiteter Irrglaube. Dieser Terminus (nach Purandara Dasa (14884-1564)) verkörpert die drei Lebensformen des indischen Tanzes:
  • Bha oder Bhava, der Ausdruck,
  • Ra für Raga oder Melodie und
  • Ta für Tala, der Rhythmik (rhythmische Zirkel).
Indien’s herausragende BharataNatyam-Tänzerinnen:

Priyadarshini Govind (Hinduonnet, 2004) Maitreyi Sarma and Ananda Shankar - MUM’S The Word (Hinduonnet, 2005) Geeta Chandran (Hinduonnet, 2005) Dr. Srekala Bharath (Hinduonnet, 2008)

v.l.n.r.: Priyadarhini Govind | MaitreyiSarma m. Dr. Ananda Shankar Jayant | Geeta Chandran | Dr. Srekala Bharath
Quelle: Hinduonnet, 2004 (Avinash Pasricha), 2005 (K. Gajendran, R. Shivaji Rao), 2008 (V. Ganesan)
Der Terminus Raag (“tonale Färbung”) findet sich erstmalig im Natya Shastra (4. Jhdt. v. Chr. – 2. Jhdt. n. Chr.) wieder, dem Handbuch für Dramaturgie von dem mythische Brahmanen Bharata Muni, einem Priester und Weisen. Die sieben (7) Hauptnoten (sapta svaras), die man auch heute verwendet, werden mit verschiedenen Gemütszuständen (9 Emotionen = Nava Rasa-s) verbunden. Im Natya Sastra werden auch Musikinstrumente und Ihre Art der spieltechnischen Handhabung beschrieben. Es weist vier Kategorien aus: Laute (tata), Flöte (Sushira), Cymbal (Ghana) und Trommel (Avanadha).
.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs of the Months (05–06/2014): The legacy of Sultan Khan – The Future of Sarangi (part 2 of 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 8, 2014

The Legacy of Ustad Sultan Khan – The Future of Sarangi

Today’s edition of ‘Raga CDs of the Month’ @ Radio RaSA (and worldwide as webradio) is following our  broadcasting  “Celestial Music of 726 years – a review of 2011“.

The worldwide community of friends for Indian classical music had lost in 2011 nine outstanding maestros. Among them is Ustad Sultan Khan. He died of a kidney failure on Sunday afternoon, 27 November 2011 (Note: Ustad Sultan Khan had diabetis and was dialysis patient in the last four years.)

The fan base affectionately called Sultan Khan (1940-2011) the “Sultan of Sarangi“.

dates of broadcasting …

part 2:  9th June 2014 – 04:00-04:58 pm EST (10:00-10:58 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
part 1:  26th May 2014 – 04:00-04:58 pm EST (10:00-10:58 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(premiere: 15th January 2012 – 03:00-05:00 pm CET @ radio multicult.fm (Berlin))

broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Sarangi … Voice of 100 Colors.

The sarangi (derived from Sau-Rang: Voice of the 100 colors) is one of the string instruments of Indian classical music. The Sarangi is the Indian fiddle. The story lays back to the 13th century B.C. according to ancient writings where instruments had been described that have a similar structure as we know today by Sarangis, like the Pinaki Veena (lute).

The tuning of the clunky-looking instrument is an art in itself. The Sarangi body is hollowed out of a solid piece of wood and covered with goat skin as the resonance board, 39 strings are stretched. Of these are 35 resonance strings which are divided into four groups. 3-4 main strings (gut) are played with a horse hair stringed bow made of rosewood. Those who are concerned more about the history of the sarangi we recommend our show “The Sarangi Project – The Voice of 100 colors“.

You can re-read and re-listen this show (as all IMC shows) in our online archive  www.imcradio.net/onlinearchiv (see moderaton scripts: http://www.imcradio.net/scripts )

The Khan Family… 10 Generations with Sarangi.

Sultan Khan (1940-2011) & Sabir Khan (son)

Sultan Khan (1940-2011) & Sabir Khan (son)

Ustad Sultan Khan was initially trained by his father Gulab Khan. In 1951, Ustad Sultan Khan was 11 years old and presented himself 1st time on stage at the All-India Conference. The musicians clan Khan around Sultan Khan plays the sarangi currently in 10ter generation. Sabir Khan is the son of Sultan Khan and occurs in the footsteps of his father. Since the early 90s of last century Sabir Khan plays on stage. For a long time he accompanied his father in a duet. Sabir was trained by his father and his uncle Ustad Nasir Khan. Sabir’s cousin is Sarangi player, too. Dilshad Khan has presented himself to the European audience in June 2007 performing at the first Indian festival of Grenoble. And there is Sultan Khan’s nephew Imran Khan. Although Imran has become a sitar player by the wish of his father he was also trained by Sultan Khan.

Instrumental singing… Gayaki Ang (vocal style)

The peculiarity of Ustad Sultan Khan’s play on the Sarangi is the imitation of the singing of Indian classical music. Sultan Khan was influenced by the vocal styles of singing legend Ustad Amir Khan, Faiyaz Khan and Ghulam Ali Khan Bath. The special way of playing with instrumental interpretation of the voice is called “gayaki ang”… singing using an instrument. Ustad Imdad Khan (1848-1920) on the surbahar was among the first who introduced this technique on a stringed instrument.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs des Monats (05-06/14): Das Erbe von Sultan Khan – Die Zukunft der Sarangi (Teil 2 von 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 8, 2014

Das Erbe von Ustad Sultan Khan – Die Zukunft der Sarangi

Die heute Ausgabe von Raga CDs des Monats auf Radio RaSA (und weltweit als Webradio) folgt unserer Sendung “726 Jahre himmlische Musik, ein Rückblick auf 2011“.

In 2011 hatte die weltweite Gemeinschaft von Freunden der indisch-klassischen Musik neun herausragende Meister verloren. Darunter befindet sich Ustad Sultan Khan. Er verstarb nach einem Nierenversagen an einem Sonntag-Nachmittag, am 27. November 2011 (Anm.: Ustad Sultan Khan war Diabetiker und in den letzten 4 Jahren Dialysepatient.)

Von der Fangemeinde wurde Sultan Khan (1940-2011) l/iebevoll der “Sultan der Sarangi” genannt.

Sendetermine…

Teil 2: 09. Juni 2014 – 22:00-22:58 Uhr CET (04:00-05:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
Teil 1: 26. Mai 2014 – 22:00-22:58 Uhr CET (04:00-05:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(Premiere: 15. Januar 2012 – 15:00-17:00 Uhr @ radio mulitcult.fm)

broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Sarangi… Stimme der 100 Farben.

Die Sarangi (abgeleitet aus Sau-Rang: Stimme der 100 Farben) gehört zu den Streichinstrumenten der indischen Klassik; es ist die indische Fiddel. Die Geschichte der Sarangi geht bis in’s 13. Jhdt. V. Chr. Geburt zurück. In antiken Schriften werden Lauteninstrumente beschrieben, die von ähnlicher Struktur der uns bekannten Sarangis sind, wie die Pinaki Veena.

Die Stimmung des klobig wirkenden Instruments ist eine Kunst für sich. Auf den Sarangikörper, der aus einem massiven Holzstück ausgehöhlt und mit Ziegenhaut als Resonanzdecke bespannt ist, werden 39 Saiten aufgespannt. Davon sind 35 Rsesonanzseiten, die sich in vier Gruppen gliedern. Die 3-4 Hauptsaiten sind aus Darm geflochten undwerden von einem mit Rosshaar bespannten Bogen aus Rosenholz gestrichen. Wer sich mit der Geschichte der Sarangi näher befassen möchte, dem empfehlen wir unsere Sendung “Das Sarangi Projekt – Die Stimme der 100 Farben“.
Sie können diese Sendung wie alle IMC-Sendungen in unserem Online-Archiv nachhören und nachlesen, unter www.imcradio.net/onlinearchiv (Moderationsskripte s. http://www.imcradio.net/scripts )

10 Generationen Sarangi… Die Khan Familie.

Sultan Khan (1940-2011) & Sabir Khan (son)

Sultan Khan (1940-2011) & Sabir Khan (son)

Ustad Sultan Khan wurde zunächst von seinem Vater Gulab Khan ausgebildet. Im Jahre 1951 war Ustad Sultan Khan 11 Jahre alt und präsentierte sich bei der All-India Conference. Der Musikerklan Khan um Sultan Khan spielt die Sarangi aktuell in 10ter Generation. Sabir Khan ist der Sohn von Sultan Khan und tritt in die Fusstapfen seines Vaters. Seit Anfang der 90er Jahre des letzten Jahrhunderts spielt Sabir Khan auf der Bühne. Lange Zeit begleitete er seinen Vater im Duett. Sabir wurde von seinem Vater und von seinem Onkel Ustad Nasir Khan ausgebildet. Auch sein Cousin wurde Sarangispieler. Dilshad Khan stellte sich in Europe im Juni 2007 dem Publikum vor, beim ersten indischen Festival in Grenoble. Und da wäre noch Sultan Khan’s Neffe Imran Khan. Imran ist zwar Sitarspieler geworden, dem Wunsche seines Vaters folgend; doch auch er wurde von Sultan Khan ausgebildet.

Instrumentalspiel… Gayaki Ang (Vocal Style)

Die Besonderheit von Ustad Sultan Khan’s Spiel auf der Sarangi ist die Imitation des Gesangs der indisch-klassischen Musik. Sultan Khan wurde maßgeblich von dem Gesangstil der Gesangslegenden Ustad Amir Khan, Faiyaz Khan und Bade Ghulam Ali Khan beeinflusst. Die besondere Spielweise, instrumental den Gesang zu interpretieren nennt man “gayaki ang”, quasi das Singen mittels Instrument. Ustad Imdad Khan (1848-1920) auf der Surbahar war einer der ersten, der diese Technik auf einem Saiteninstrument einführte.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

A – Raga CDs des Monats (05-06/14): RAGAMALA-S – Miniaturmalereien (Teil 2 von 2)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 6, 2014

R A G A M A L A (Teil 1 u. 2)
Gedicht – Bild – Musik … das gesprochene Bild der Raga-Malerei.

Neben den herausragenden Musikkompositionen der nordindischen (Hindustani) Klassik wie südindischen, karnatischen Musik, zeigt sich die künstlerische Schaffenskraft des indischen Subkontinents in imponierenden Palastanlagen und Monumentalmalereien wie in den Höhlentempeln von Ajanta. Sie können bis auf das 2.-1. Jh. v. Chr. zurückdatiert werden. Daneben hat sich eine einzigartige Malkunst, die Handschriftenilluminiation und die indische Miniaturmalerei, die >raga mala< etabliert. Sie korreliert mit der indischen Musik und der Ragaform unmittelbar …

Bereits viele Jahrhunderte vor den >raga mala-s< wurden jedem Raga und Ragini, der weiblichen Form eines Ragas, eine psychische Form (Rupa) zugesprochen. Sie manifestiert sich in zwei Ausprägungen. Die indischen Musiktheoretiker haben die blosse Klangform der Melodien, nadamaya-rupa, unterschieden von den dahinter, im Verborgenen liegenden Urbildern der göttlichen Weisheit – devatamaya-rupa. Die indischen Minitarumalereien fallen in die zweite Kategorie. Sie sollen beim Betrachter in der gedanklichen Vorstellung „Harmonien” wecken, die mit dem, was gesehen wird, korrespondieren. Der gemalte Raga funktioniert ähnlich einem Yantra, um den spirituellen Zustand zu realisieren, wie er durch das Yoga erreicht werden kann.

Sendetermine …

Sonntag, 25. Mai 2014 (Teil 1) – 23:00 Uhr (CET) @ Radio FRO (A)
Sonntag, 08. Juni 2014 (
Teil 2) – 23:00 Uhr (CET) @ Radio FRO (A)
(Premiere:  6. März & 3. April 2007 (Teil 1 u. 2) @ Tide Radio 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

In ihrem ursprünglichen Sinne spricht man der Miniaturmalkunst einen religiösen Charakter zu. Die Bilddarstellungen wurden mit Handschriften illustriert, weniger der Freude an der Kunst als um religiöse Verdienste zu erwerben.

Die musik-inspirierten indischen Miniaturmalereien sind einzigartig, eine komplexe Kunstform, wie sie in keiner anderen Kultur unserer Welt anzutreffen ist … Sie erlebten ihre Blütezeit unter der Regentschaft von Akbar, einem der vier für Indien besonders bedeutsamen Moghul-Herrschern, neben Jehangir, Shah Jehan und Aurangzeb. Der Mughul-Stil wird datiert zwischen 1556 bis 1605.

Die Zeit der Bildermalerei ging 1658 zu Ende. Die Nachwelt verdankt der Miniaturmalerei eine bis in alle Einzelheiten gehende bildliche Schilderung der damaligen geistigen und materiellen Kultur. Relativ spät hat man die Bedeutung der Illustrationen und ihre Beziehung im Sinne einer musik-inspirierten Malerei verstehen können. Das Manuskript des Kalpasutra (Jinacaritra) wurde erst 1956 einer breiteren Öffentlichkeit bekannt. Es kann auf das Ende des 15. Jahrhunderts datiert werden.

Ragini Kamodini Raga Lalita Ragini Danashre Raga Hindol
Indische Miniaturmalereien – Ragamalas

Die IMC-Sendung „RAGAMALA … Gedicht – Bild – Musik … das gesprochene Bild der Raga-Malerei” (Teil 1 & 2) beschränkt sich auf den westlichen Malstil. Der Östliche ist in Indien mit der Vernichtung des Buddhismus durch die islamische Eroberung Nordindiens im 13. Jahrhundert erloschen … und lebte nur noch in wenigen Malschulen in Nepal und Tibet fort.

Worin liegt der Reiz der Kleinformate, der indischen Minitaturmalerei, der raga mala-s ? – Für die meisten Betrachter aus dem Westens wirken die indischen Miniaturmalereien zunächst fremd. Ihre Schönheit verschliesst sich uns auf den ersten Blick durch eine spezielle Codierung. Für den modernen Betrachter des 21. Jahrhunderts liegt ihre Faszination vor allem in den leuchtenden, scharf nebeneinandergestellten Farben. Rot, Blau, Weiss, Grün und Schwarz kommen hauptsächlich vor.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: