IMC – India meets Classic presents …

… radio shows for Indian (Music) Culture

Archive for January, 2014

StudioTalk No. 2: “Music Awareness by Love…”

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 29, 2014

StudioTalk No. 2: Music Awareness by Love… from Love to Music.
From Guru-Shishya-Parampara to Modern Music Education in the 21st Century

IMC OnAir’s special featureStudioTalk No. 2” delivers you the documentary of an extraordinary interview with the Sarod player and film composer Ranajit Sengupta from Kolkatta, India. Ranajit visited our Hamburg Studio on 12th May 2007 beside some concerts in Hamburg and Berlin.

Sarode Maestro & Film Composer Ranajit Senguptam (Kolkatta, India)

Ranajit Sengupta’s extensive art work on the the big festival stages and his film composing for international movie projects leads him around the globe. Beside he has a deep focus onto music therapeutical work, especially the treatment of the Alap, the introduction part of an Indian Raga.

dates of broadcasting

30th January 2014 – 3-4:00 pm EST (9-10:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult (DE)
(premiere: 12th Sept 2007 (08:00 pm CET @ TIDE Radio))
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Listen to his experiences on the Sarode in the tradition of India’s music paedagogic work. Anybody may take some new ideas out of it who likes to listen to Indian Classical Music…

Posted in IMC OnAir - News, StudioTalks | Leave a Comment »

Moderation Script of StudioTalk No. 2: “Music Awareness by Love…”

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 29, 2014

StudioTalk No. 2 (with Ranajit Sengupta on Sarode) … rebroadcasting on 30th January 2014 @ radio multicult.fm

+++

Posted in IMC OnAir - News, StudioTalks | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs of the Months (01/14): Sikh Sangeet – Gurbani Kirtan (The Major Raags in Sikh Music) – part 4

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 27, 2014

Sikh Sangeet – Gurbani Kirtan (sub title: The Main Ragas in Sikh Music)

Guru Nanak Dev ji (1469 - 1539) - Quelle: www.sikh-history.com

Guru Nanak Dev ji (1469 – 1539) – Quelle: http://www.sikh-history.com

 The Hindustani music from North India and South Indian (Carnatic) music is essentially the story of the Hinduism and Moghul emperors. The ancient scripts of Hinduism are the Vedas and can be dated back until around 1200 B.C. (e.g. Rigveda). The Moghuls were represented in Northern India from 1526 to 1858, among them Akbar as the most meaingful. Akbar reigned from 1556-1605.

The Indian classical music has contributed significantly to justify the Sikhism. As the founder of the Sikh doctrine is Guru Nanak Dev (15 April 1469 – September 22, 1539 in Talwandi (now in Pakistan)) as the first of ten (10) gurus. They all lived in the period from 1469 to 1708 and have dominated the Sikhism in various ways. Nanak Dev, the first Guru started as early in the 15th century to teach as an itinerant preacher the basic principles of Sikhism on his travels. With the findings from the various religions, who met him, from Hinduism, Jainism, Islam to Sufism Guru Nanak Dev put an independent doctrine of the unity of God, or rather of the divine..

dates of broadcasting

part 4: 27th January 2014 – 04:00-05:00 pm EST (10:00-11:00 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
part 3: 13th January 2014 – 04:00-05:00 pm EST (10:00-11:00 pm CET@ Radio RaSA (
CH)

broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

The teaching of Sikhism is a monotheistic. Guru Dev Nanank did not speak of a God, not as a personification of the divine rather than the unknown, indeterminable, formless … omnipresent, in the spiritual sense.

In 1678 the individual writings were summed up by the 10th teacher Guru Gobind Singh, – on the basis of the Adi Granth – as the final version of Guru Granth Sahib. In the holy book of Sikhism there are a total of 1430 pages (Ang) and a plurality of Shabads (hymns). There are texts that are assigned to a specific Raga form (see table).
———————————————————————————–
31 Ragas in Guru Granth Sahib
———————————————————————————–
No. | Name of Raga | Order No. | Page Range | Page Count
——————————————————————————-
1 Asa 4 347 to 489 142
2 Bairari 13 719 to 721 2
3 Basant 25 1168 to 1197 29
4 Bhairon 24 1125 to 1168 43
5 Bihagara 7 537 to 557 20
6 Bilaval 16 795 to 859 64
7 Devagandhari 6 527 to 537 10
8 Dhanasari 10 660 to 696 36
9 Gauri 3 151 to 347 196
10 Gond 17 859 to 876 17
11 Gujari 5 489 to 527 38
12 Jaijaivanti 31 1352 to 1353 1
13 Jaitshree 11 696 to 711 15
14 Kalyan 29 1319 to 1327 8
15 Kahnra 28 1294 to 1319 25
16 Kedara 23 1118 to 1125 7
17 Maajh 2 94 to 151 57
18 Malhar 27 1254 to 1294 40
19 Mali Gaura 20 984 to 989 5
20 Maru 21 989 to 1107 118
21 Nat Narayan 19 975 to 984 9
22 Prabhati 30 1327 to 1352 25
23 Ramkali 18 876 to 975 99
24 Sarang 26 1197 to 1254 57
25 Shree 1 14 to 94 80
26 Sorath 9 595 to 660 65
27 Suhi 15 728 to 795 67
28 Tilang 14 721 to 728 7
29 Todi 12 711 to 719 8
30 Tukhari 22 1107 to 1118 11
31 Vadahans 8 557 to 595 38
—————————————————————————–

The poetry of the first 10 teachers were also complemented by the Indian wisdoms of Kabir (1440-1518) or of the poet and saint Namdev (1270-1350) and others.

Sikh pilgrim at the Golden Temple (Harmandir Sahib) in Amritsar, India

Sikh pilgrim at the Golden Temple (Harmandir Sahib) in Amritsar, India

The verses of the Guru Granth Sahib are written in their own language, in Gurmukhi. It is derived from Punjabi and Hindi and had been widespread in the Middle Ages in North India. The Gurmuki script has its origin in a variety of languages. Today it is the official written language of the Indian federal state Punjab. Gurmuki was standardized by the second Guru Angad Dev. The vocal Gurmukhi language consists of the Gurbani words. The text of the Guru Granth Sahib is therefore referred to as Gurbanigurbani. Gurbani is literally “the spoken word of the Master, the Guru,” which gives the student and pupil’s full attention. The Sanskrit word “guru” is more than just a teacher. For a Sikh it means teacher + spiritual leader at the same time.
Unlike in Hinduism in which one must be born, everyone can commit to Sikhism. Here we come across the idea of reincarnation. The caste system is rejected as in the Indian Constitution. Worldwide, the numbers of Sikhs are estimated to something less than 30 million. The majority live in northern India, in Punjab, the border area between India and Pakistan. After the Great Migration has begun in the 19th century, the larger Sikh diasporas developed in Canada, East Africa, the Middle East, England, Australia and New Zealand.

When you enter a Sikh temple, the Guru Granth Sahib Tront in the center. Since 1708 it is the official book of Sikhism, in unchanged form. After entering the temple, a Sikh bows symbolically n front of the holy book to honor the teachers (gurus). The Sikh religious services and celebrations are open to everyone, regardless of its origin or religion.

About Guru Nanak Dev…

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs des Monats (01/14): Sikh Sangeet – Gurbani Kirtan (Die Hauptragas in der Sikhmusik) – Teil 4

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 27, 2014

Sikh Sangeet – Gurbani Kirtan (Hauptragas in der Sikhmusik)

Guru Nanak Dev ji (1469 - 1539) - Quelle: www.sikh-history.com

Guru Nanak Dev ji (1469 – 1539) – Quelle: http://www.sikh-history.com

Die Hindustani-Musik aus Nordindien und karnatische Musik Südindiens sind im Wesentlichen von der Geschichte des

Hinduismus und dem Moghulreich geprägt. Die antiken Skripte des Hinduismus sind die Veden und können bis ca. 1200 v. Christi Geburt (Rigveda) zurückdatiert werden. Die Moghulherrscher waren in Nordindien von 1526 bis 1858 präsent, unter ihnen Akbar als der Bedeutendeste. Akbar regierte von 1556-1605. Die indische Klassik hat maßgeblich dazu beigetragen, den Sikhismus zu begründen.

Als der Begründer der Sikh-Lehre wird Guru Nanak Dev (15. April 1469 – 22. September 1539 in Talwandi (im heutigen Pakistan)) gesehen, der erste von zehn (10) Gurus. Sie alle lebten in dem Zeitraum von 1469 bis 1708 und haben den Sikhismus auf unterschiedlichste Weise geprägt. Nanak Dev begann als der erste Guru bereits im 15. Jahrhundert die Grundzüge des Sikhismus auf seinen Reisen als Wanderprediger zu lehren. Mit den Erkenntnissen aus den verschiedenen Religionen, die ihm begegneten, vom Hindusimus, Jainismus, Islamismus bis zum Sufismus formulierte Guru Nanak Dev eine eigenständige Lehre über die Einheit Gottes, oder viel mehr des Göttlichen.

Sendetermine …

Teil 4: 27. Januar 2014 – 22:00-23:00 Uhr CET (4:00-5:00 p.m. EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
Teil 3: 13. Januar 2014 – 22:00-23:00 Uhr CET (4:00-5:00 p.m. EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Die Lehre des Sikhismus ist eine Monotheistische. Guru Nanank Dev sprach aber nicht von einem Gott, nicht in Form einer Personifizierung, vielmehr von dem Göttlichen, als dem Unbekannten, Unbestimmbaren, Formlosen… allgegegnwärtig, im spirituellen Sinne.

Im Jahre 1678 fasste der 10. Lehrer Guru Gobind Singh die einzelnen Schriften – auf der Basis des Adi granth – zu der abschliessenden Fassung des Guru Granth Sahib zusammen.  In dem heiligen Buch des Sikhismus, finden sich auf insgesamt 1430 Seiten (Angs) eine Vielzahl von Shabads (Hymnen). Es sind Texte, die einer bestimmten Ragaform zugeordnet werden (s. Tabelle).
——————————————————————————-
Ragas imGuru Granth Sahib
——————————————————————————-
No.   |  Name of Raga  Order No.Page Range  |  Page Count
——————————————————————————-
1    Asa    4    347 to 489    142
2    Bairari    13    719 to 721    2
3    Basant    25    1168 to 1197    29
4    Bhairon    24    1125 to 1168    43
5    Bihagara    7    537 to 557    20
6    Bilaval    16    795 to 859    64
7    Devagandhari    6    527 to 537    10
8    Dhanasari    10    660 to 696    36
9    Gauri    3    151 to 347    196
10    Gond    17    859 to 876    17
11    Gujari    5    489 to 527    38
12    Jaijaivanti    31    1352 to 1353    1
13    Jaitshree    11    696 to 711    15
14    Kalyan    29    1319 to 1327    8
15    Kahnra    28    1294 to 1319    25
16    Kedara    23    1118 to 1125    7
17    Maajh    2    94 to 151    57
18    Malhar    27    1254 to 1294    40
19    Mali Gaura    20    984 to 989    5
20    Maru    21    989 to 1107    118
21    Nat Narayan    19    975 to 984    9
22    Prabhati    30    1327 to 1352    25
23    Ramkali    18    876 to 975    99
24    Sarang    26    1197 to 1254    57
25    Shree    1    14 to 94    80
26    Sorath    9    595 to 660    65
27    Suhi    15    728 to 795    67
28    Tilang    14    721 to 728    7
29    Todi    12    711 to 719    8
30    Tukhari    22    1107 to 1118    11
31    Vadahans    8    557 to 595    38
————————————————————————-

Die Texte der ersten 10 Lehrer wurden zudem ergänzt um Weisheiten des indischen Mysthikers Kabir (1440-1518) oder des Poeten und Heiligen Namdev (1270-1350) und anderer.

Sikh pilgrim at the Golden Temple (Harmandir Sahib) in Amritsar, India

Sikh pilgrim at the Golden Temple (Harmandir Sahib) in Amritsar, India

Die Verse des Guru Granth Sahib sind in einer eigenen Sprache verfasst, in Gurmukhi. Sie leitet sich aus Punjabi und Hindi ab und war im Mittelalter Nordindiens weit verbreitet. Die Gurkmuki-Schrift hat ihren Urpsrung in einer Vielzahl von Sprachen. Heute ist sie die offizielle Schriftsprache des indischen Bun

desstaates Punjab. Standardisiert wurde Gurmuki von dem zweiten Guru Angad Dev. Die Vokalsprache Gurmukhi besteht aus den Gurbani-Wörtnern. Den Text des Guru Granth Sahib bezeichnet man daher als Gurbanigurbani.  Gurbani ist sinngemäß “das gesprochene Wort des Meisters, des Gurus”, dem der Studierende, der Schüler seine ganze Aufmerksamkeit schenkt. Der Sanskrit-Begriff “Guru” ist mehr als nur Lehrer. Für einen Sikh bedeutet es Lehrer + spiritueller Führer zugleich.

Anders als im Hinduismus, in den man hineingeboren werden muss, kann sich jeder zum Sikhismus bekennen. Hier treffen wir auch auf die Vorstellung von Reinkarnation. Das Kastensystem wird wie in der indischen Verfassung abgelehnt. Weltweit werden die Zahl der Sikhs auf etwas weniger als 30 Millionen geschätzt. Die Mehrzahl lebt im Norden Indiens, im Punjab, dem Grenzgebiet zwischen Indien und Pakistan. Nachdem die Völkerwanderung im 19. Jahrhundert eingesetzt hat, entstanden in Kanada, Ost-Afrika, im mittleren Osten, in England, Australien und Neuseeland die größeren Diasporas.

Betritt man einen Sikh-Tempel, tront das Guru Granth Sahib im Zentrum. Seit 1708 ist es das offizielle Buch des Sikhismus, in unveränderter Form. Nach Betreten des Tempels verbeugt sich ein Sikh zur Ehrerbietung der Lehrer symbolisch vor dem Heiligen Buch. Die Gottesdienste und Sikh-Feste können von jedermann besucht werden, ungeachtet seiner Herkunft oder Religion.

Über Guru nanak Dev….

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

26th January: 65th Republic Day of India

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 26, 2014

Warm wishes on Republic Day to our Indian and musical friends…

happy republic day wallpapers photos 2014 girl

In India, Republic Day honours the date on which the Constitution of India came into force on 26 January 1950 replacing the Government of India Act (1935) as the governing document of India.

The Constitution was passed by the Constituent Assembly of India on 26 November 1949 but was adopted on 26 January 1950 with a democratic government system, completing the country’s transition toward becoming an independent republic. 26 January was selected for this purpose because it was this day in 1930 when the Declaration of Indian Independence (Purna Swaraj) was proclaimed by the Indian National Congress.

It is one of three national holidays in India, other two being Independence Day and Gandhi Jayanti.

(Source: 01/2014 – Wikipedia.org)

Related articles

The 65th Republic Day Parade (live @ Doordarshan TV)

+++

Posted in Culture (news), Economics (news), Education (news), Politics (news), Religion (news) | Leave a Comment »

A – Raga CDs of the Months (01/14): Sikh Sangeet – Gurbani Kirtan (The Major Raags in Sikh Music) – part 3

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 25, 2014

Sikh Sangeet – Gurbani Kirtan (sub title: The Main Ragas in Sikh Music)

Guru Nanak Dev ji (1469 - 1539) - Quelle: www.sikh-history.com

Guru Nanak Dev ji (1469 – 1539) – Quelle: http://www.sikh-history.com

 The Hindustani music from North India and South Indian (Carnatic) music is essentially the story of the Hinduism and Moghul emperors. The ancient scripts of Hinduism are the Vedas and can be dated back until around 1200 B.C. (e.g. Rigveda). The Moghuls were represented in Northern India from 1526 to 1858, among them Akbar as the most meaingful. Akbar reigned from 1556-1605.

The Indian classical music has contributed significantly to justify the Sikhism. As the founder of the Sikh doctrine is Guru Nanak Dev (15 April 1469 – September 22, 1539 in Talwandi (now in Pakistan)) as the first of ten (10) gurus. They all lived in the period from 1469 to 1708 and have dominated the Sikhism in various ways. Nanak Dev, the first Guru started as early in the 15th century to teach as an itinerant preacher the basic principles of Sikhism on his travels. With the findings from the various religions, who met him, from Hinduism, Jainism, Islam to Sufism Guru Nanak Dev put an independent doctrine of the unity of God, or rather of the divine..

dates of broadcasting

part 3: 26th January 20134– 05:00-06:00 pm EST (11:00 pm-12:00 am CET) @ Radio FRO (A)
part 4: 9th February 20134– 05:00-06:00 pm EST (11:00 pm-12:00 am CET) @ Radio FRO (A)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

The teaching of Sikhism is a monotheistic. Guru Dev Nanank did not speak of a God, not as a personification of the divine rather than the unknown, indeterminable, formless … omnipresent, in the spiritual sense.

In 1678 the individual writings were summed up by the 10th teacher Guru Gobind Singh, – on the basis of the Adi Granth – as the final version of Guru Granth Sahib. In the holy book of Sikhism there are a total of 1430 pages (Ang) and a plurality of Shabads (hymns). There are texts that are assigned to a specific Raga form (see table).
———————————————————————————–
31 Ragas in Guru Granth Sahib
———————————————————————————–
No. | Name of Raga | Order No. | Page Range | Page Count
——————————————————————————-
1 Asa 4 347 to 489 142
2 Bairari 13 719 to 721 2
3 Basant 25 1168 to 1197 29
4 Bhairon 24 1125 to 1168 43
5 Bihagara 7 537 to 557 20
6 Bilaval 16 795 to 859 64
7 Devagandhari 6 527 to 537 10
8 Dhanasari 10 660 to 696 36
9 Gauri 3 151 to 347 196
10 Gond 17 859 to 876 17
11 Gujari 5 489 to 527 38
12 Jaijaivanti 31 1352 to 1353 1
13 Jaitshree 11 696 to 711 15
14 Kalyan 29 1319 to 1327 8
15 Kahnra 28 1294 to 1319 25
16 Kedara 23 1118 to 1125 7
17 Maajh 2 94 to 151 57
18 Malhar 27 1254 to 1294 40
19 Mali Gaura 20 984 to 989 5
20 Maru 21 989 to 1107 118
21 Nat Narayan 19 975 to 984 9
22 Prabhati 30 1327 to 1352 25
23 Ramkali 18 876 to 975 99
24 Sarang 26 1197 to 1254 57
25 Shree 1 14 to 94 80
26 Sorath 9 595 to 660 65
27 Suhi 15 728 to 795 67
28 Tilang 14 721 to 728 7
29 Todi 12 711 to 719 8
30 Tukhari 22 1107 to 1118 11
31 Vadahans 8 557 to 595 38
—————————————————————————–

The poetry of the first 10 teachers were also complemented by the Indian wisdoms of Kabir (1440-1518) or of the poet and saint Namdev (1270-1350) and others.

Sikh pilgrim at the Golden Temple (Harmandir Sahib) in Amritsar, India

Sikh pilgrim at the Golden Temple (Harmandir Sahib) in Amritsar, India

The verses of the Guru Granth Sahib are written in their own language, in Gurmukhi. It is derived from Punjabi and Hindi and had been widespread in the Middle Ages in North India. The Gurmuki script has its origin in a variety of languages. Today it is the official written language of the Indian federal state Punjab. Gurmuki was standardized by the second Guru Angad Dev. The vocal Gurmukhi language consists of the Gurbani words. The text of the Guru Granth Sahib is therefore referred to as Gurbanigurbani. Gurbani is literally “the spoken word of the Master, the Guru,” which gives the student and pupil’s full attention. The Sanskrit word “guru” is more than just a teacher. For a Sikh it means teacher + spiritual leader at the same time.
Unlike in Hinduism in which one must be born, everyone can commit to Sikhism. Here we come across the idea of reincarnation. The caste system is rejected as in the Indian Constitution. Worldwide, the numbers of Sikhs are estimated to something less than 30 million. The majority live in northern India, in Punjab, the border area between India and Pakistan. After the Great Migration has begun in the 19th century, the larger Sikh diasporas developed in Canada, East Africa, the Middle East, England, Australia and New Zealand.

When you enter a Sikh temple, the Guru Granth Sahib Tront in the center. Since 1708 it is the official book of Sikhism, in unchanged form. After entering the temple, a Sikh bows symbolically n front of the holy book to honor the teachers (gurus). The Sikh religious services and celebrations are open to everyone, regardless of its origin or religion.

About Guru Nanak Dev…

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

A – Raga CDs des Monats (01/14): Sikh Sangeet – Gurbani Kirtan (Die Hauptragas in der Sikhmusik) – Teil3

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 25, 2014

Sikh Sangeet – Gurbani Kirtan (Hauptragas in der Sikhmusik)

Guru Nanak Dev ji (1469 - 1539) - Quelle: www.sikh-history.com

Guru Nanak Dev ji (1469 – 1539) – Quelle: http://www.sikh-history.com

Die Hindustani-Musik aus Nordindien und karnatische Musik Südindiens sind im Wesentlichen von der Geschichte des

Hinduismus und dem Moghulreich geprägt. Die antiken Skripte des Hinduismus sind die Veden und können bis ca. 1200 v. Christi Geburt (Rigveda) zurückdatiert werden. Die Moghulherrscher waren in Nordindien von 1526 bis 1858 präsent, unter ihnen Akbar als der Bedeutendeste. Akbar regierte von 1556-1605. Die indische Klassik hat maßgeblich dazu beigetragen, den Sikhismus zu begründen.

Als der Begründer der Sikh-Lehre wird Guru Nanak Dev (15. April 1469 – 22. September 1539 in Talwandi (im heutigen Pakistan)) gesehen, der erste von zehn (10) Gurus. Sie alle lebten in dem Zeitraum von 1469 bis 1708 und haben den Sikhismus auf unterschiedlichste Weise geprägt. Nanak Dev begann als der erste Guru bereits im 15. Jahrhundert die Grundzüge des Sikhismus auf seinen Reisen als Wanderprediger zu lehren. Mit den Erkenntnissen aus den verschiedenen Religionen, die ihm begegneten, vom Hindusimus, Jainismus, Islamismus bis zum Sufismus formulierte Guru Nanak Dev eine eigenständige Lehre über die Einheit Gottes, oder viel mehr des Göttlichen.

Sendetermine …

Teil 3: 26. Januar 2014 – 23:00-24:00 Uhr CET (5:00-6:00 p.m. EST) @ RadioFRO (A)
Teil 4: 9. Februar 2014 – 23:00-24:00 Uhr CET (5:00-6:00 p.m. EST) @ RadioFRO (A)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Die Lehre des Sikhismus ist eine Monotheistische. Guru Nanank Dev sprach aber nicht von einem Gott, nicht in Form einer Personifizierung, vielmehr von dem Göttlichen, als dem Unbekannten, Unbestimmbaren, Formlosen… allgegegnwärtig, im spirituellen Sinne.

Im Jahre 1678 fasste der 10. Lehrer Guru Gobind Singh die einzelnen Schriften – auf der Basis des Adi granth – zu der abschliessenden Fassung des Guru Granth Sahib zusammen.  In dem heiligen Buch des Sikhismus, finden sich auf insgesamt 1430 Seiten (Angs) eine Vielzahl von Shabads (Hymnen). Es sind Texte, die einer bestimmten Ragaform zugeordnet werden (s. Tabelle).
——————————————————————————-
Ragas imGuru Granth Sahib
——————————————————————————-
No.   |  Name of Raga  Order No.Page Range  |  Page Count
——————————————————————————-
1    Asa    4    347 to 489    142
2    Bairari    13    719 to 721    2
3    Basant    25    1168 to 1197    29
4    Bhairon    24    1125 to 1168    43
5    Bihagara    7    537 to 557    20
6    Bilaval    16    795 to 859    64
7    Devagandhari    6    527 to 537    10
8    Dhanasari    10    660 to 696    36
9    Gauri    3    151 to 347    196
10    Gond    17    859 to 876    17
11    Gujari    5    489 to 527    38
12    Jaijaivanti    31    1352 to 1353    1
13    Jaitshree    11    696 to 711    15
14    Kalyan    29    1319 to 1327    8
15    Kahnra    28    1294 to 1319    25
16    Kedara    23    1118 to 1125    7
17    Maajh    2    94 to 151    57
18    Malhar    27    1254 to 1294    40
19    Mali Gaura    20    984 to 989    5
20    Maru    21    989 to 1107    118
21    Nat Narayan    19    975 to 984    9
22    Prabhati    30    1327 to 1352    25
23    Ramkali    18    876 to 975    99
24    Sarang    26    1197 to 1254    57
25    Shree    1    14 to 94    80
26    Sorath    9    595 to 660    65
27    Suhi    15    728 to 795    67
28    Tilang    14    721 to 728    7
29    Todi    12    711 to 719    8
30    Tukhari    22    1107 to 1118    11
31    Vadahans    8    557 to 595    38
————————————————————————-

Die Texte der ersten 10 Lehrer wurden zudem ergänzt um Weisheiten des indischen Mysthikers Kabir (1440-1518) oder des Poeten und Heiligen Namdev (1270-1350) und anderer.

Sikh pilgrim at the Golden Temple (Harmandir Sahib) in Amritsar, India

Sikh pilgrim at the Golden Temple (Harmandir Sahib) in Amritsar, India

Die Verse des Guru Granth Sahib sind in einer eigenen Sprache verfasst, in Gurmukhi. Sie leitet sich aus Punjabi und Hindi ab und war im Mittelalter Nordindiens weit verbreitet. Die Gurkmuki-Schrift hat ihren Urpsrung in einer Vielzahl von Sprachen. Heute ist sie die offizielle Schriftsprache des indischen Bun

desstaates Punjab. Standardisiert wurde Gurmuki von dem zweiten Guru Angad Dev. Die Vokalsprache Gurmukhi besteht aus den Gurbani-Wörtnern. Den Text des Guru Granth Sahib bezeichnet man daher als Gurbanigurbani.  Gurbani ist sinngemäß “das gesprochene Wort des Meisters, des Gurus”, dem der Studierende, der Schüler seine ganze Aufmerksamkeit schenkt. Der Sanskrit-Begriff “Guru” ist mehr als nur Lehrer. Für einen Sikh bedeutet es Lehrer + spiritueller Führer zugleich.

Anders als im Hinduismus, in den man hineingeboren werden muss, kann sich jeder zum Sikhismus bekennen. Hier treffen wir auch auf die Vorstellung von Reinkarnation. Das Kastensystem wird wie in der indischen Verfassung abgelehnt. Weltweit werden die Zahl der Sikhs auf etwas weniger als 30 Millionen geschätzt. Die Mehrzahl lebt im Norden Indiens, im Punjab, dem Grenzgebiet zwischen Indien und Pakistan. Nachdem die Völkerwanderung im 19. Jahrhundert eingesetzt hat, entstanden in Kanada, Ost-Afrika, im mittleren Osten, in England, Australien und Neuseeland die größeren Diasporas.

Betritt man einen Sikh-Tempel, tront das Guru Granth Sahib im Zentrum. Seit 1708 ist es das offizielle Buch des Sikhismus, in unveränderter Form. Nach Betreten des Tempels verbeugt sich ein Sikh zur Ehrerbietung der Lehrer symbolisch vor dem Heiligen Buch. Die Gottesdienste und Sikh-Feste können von jedermann besucht werden, ungeachtet seiner Herkunft oder Religion.

Über Guru nanak Dev….

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

22nd-25th Jan 2014: 62nd (Annual) DOVER LANE MUSIC CONFERENCE (Kolkata)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 22, 2014

An Indian classical music festival held every January at Nazrul Mancha, a large open air auditorium in the south of the city. It takes place every year, and draws large crowds. It takes its name from its original location in the city centre.

Venue: Nazrul Mancha (Rabindra Sarovar Park). see Google Maps
Website (official) with fully programme infos: www.doverlanemusicconference.org
IMCRadio’s Facebook platform: The Dover Lane Fan page

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

_______________

(reported by Tanusrita Sengupta)

62nd Annual Dover Lane Music Conference in the memory of Rathin Mustaphi and Mridul Mitra at the Nazrul Mancha in Rabindra Sarobar, Kolkata

awardKolkata, Dec 24 (IBNS): Music maestros from across the country came together on Monday at the 62nd Annual Dover Lane Music Conference, one of India’s most awaited classical music festivals, being held here in the memory of Rathin Mustaphi and Mridul Mitra at the Nazrul Mancha in Rabindra Sarobar.

The Dover Lane Music Conference started on Jan 22, 2014 and will continue till Jan 25, 2014.

Music maestros Ali Ahmed Hussein Khan, Ajoy Chakraborty, Kaushiki Chakraborty, Tanmay Bose, Purnima Sen, Subhankar Banerjee, Samar Saha, Abhijit Banerjee, Anandagopal Banerjee, Kaushik Bhattacharya and others were present at the music conference press meet.

Pandit Ajoy Chakraborty said, “India is the richest country in music, arts and culture in the world. Music should be incorporated in the school syllabus.”

Tabla player Subhankar Banerjee said, “I am attached with Dover lane for 30 years. But I have been playing tabla here for 23 years.”

“Dover lane has become like my family,” he added.

Banerjee said, “It is a shame for us that music is not in the mandatory school syllabus. If some private school has it as a subject; no government school has.”

Tabla player Samar Saha said, “I am performing for 25 years in Dover lane”.

The Dover Lane Music Conference is a registered society under West Bengal Societies Act 1961, engaged in the promotion and propagation of Indian classical music since its inception in 1952 in Kolkata at Dover Lane in the southern part of the city.

(Source: 12/24/2013 – NewsWala | The Hyderabad Deccan English Daily)
Sitar player Anoushka Shankar @ Dover Lane 2014 on 24th Jan...

Sitar player Anoushka Shankar @ Dover Lane 2014 on 24th Jan…

vocal maestro Pandit Jasraj @ Dover Lane 2013

+++

Posted in Culture (news), Live around the globe | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the Months (01/14): Evening & Night Ragas – Violin and Sitar

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 19, 2014

Evening & Night ragas (part 1 begins 04:00 pm EST) – Indian Violin…

The Indian self understanding of >late evening< following a long working day is “be funny” and “joyfulness”. The raga group of kafi, bageshri and sindura ragas represent this mood. The evening ragas like yaman, shree, marwa and purvi can wake the emotions of prosperity and active live.

violinist Kala Ramnath (North Indian Classics)

violinist Kala Ramnath (North Indian Classics)

The violin has the ability to reproduce every shadow nad nuance of the vocal music, however only some few representatives exist in the Northern part (Hindustani Music) less than in the Southern part of India. Especially the women established themselves as violin players like Kala Ramnath, Anupria or Sunita, daughter of the female violinist Minto Khaund or Sangeeta Shankar, Kala’s cousine and Gingger the niece of L. Shankar (violinist) and daughter of L. Subramaniam (violinist), all representatives of the younger music generation…

dates of broadcasting …

20th Jan 2014 – 4:00-5:58 pm EST (10:00-11:58 pm CET) @ TIDE Radio (DE)
(premiere: 27th November 2006 @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Evening & Night ragas (part 2 begins 05:00 pm EST) – Violin and Sitar…

Sitar maestro Nikhil Banerjee

Sitar maestro Nikhil Banerjee

IMC – India meets Classic continues its path following the violin in India and its exceedengly importance for Indian Classical Music… In comparision with the violine the sound picture of evening and night ragas on the sitar is being opposed. Together with the violinist Kala Ramnath the sitar maestro Purbayan Chatterjee presents in a jugal bandi, the Indian form of a duet, the late evening raga Bageshri and here about an interpretation of the rhythmic lively and light vocal style Tarana. An All India Radio release presents Purbayans guru and great ideal Pandit Nikhil Bannerjee in a Sitar solo of the evening raga Desh.

The violin has been accepted in the northern part of India at all, but in a smooth way. As no other instrument from the Western area the violin has established deeply in the South Indian Music style. Presentation forms and performances we know today had been developed in the golden age of the South Indian Classic between 1750 and 1850 (e.g. compositions of Thygaraja, Dikshitar and Syama Sastri). The violin was introduced into the South of India by Baluswamy Dikshitar in the early 19th century.

violinist Dr. N. Rajam (South Indian Classics)

violinist Dr. N. Rajam (South Indian Classics)

As representatives of the South Indian Music IMC – India meets Classic presents in part some violinists, e.g. Dr. N. Rajam. She has the biggest impact onto the Indian Classical Mucis of all female violinists in India … and combines the North Indian style with the South Indian form, too. On her CD RADIANT she presents the midnight raga Malkauns, which exists as Raga Hindolam in the Carnatic Music, too. Both belong to the Bhairavi Thaat System, the ascendenting and falling scales existe each of 6 notes (swaras): Sa – ga – ma – da – ni – Sa.

Dr. N. Rajams daugther, Sangeeta Shankar, did many different music art works of both traditions (Hindustani, Carnatic) together with her mother. IMC – India meets Classic presents Sangeeta as a solist together with the tabla virtuoso Ustad Zakir Hussain playing the late night raga Bageshree.

The brothers and violin duo Ganesh & Kumaresh are two of the leading artists of the South Indian Music (Carnatic). Ganesh and Kumaresh develope the violin play techniqually to a very expressive form … with their CD SUNDARAM (= beauty) they document the South Indian form Ragam Tanam Pallavi by an individual composition of Ganesh, which is according to the evening raga Vasanta in South India. Vasanta is one of the eldest Ragas in India, performed since more than 1000 years. Typically for the South Indian Vocal and Instrumental Music Ganesh and Kumaresh are being accompanied instead of the Tabla by the Mridanga, the traditional drum of India and the Ghatam, a vessel like sound body made of clay.

Reference: IMC – India meets Classic seperatelly will have in one of its next special features a deeper focus onto the Indian violin and its figure for fusion, jazz and world music and presents some extra ordinary violin players, e.g. Dr. Lakshminarayana Shankar, known as L. Shankar, his brother L. Subramaniam, titled in his home country as the “The God of Indian Violin, “The Paganini of Indian Classical Music or his pupil (Shishya) S. Harikumar and others …

 

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (01/14): Abend- Nachtragas – Violine & Sitar

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on January 19, 2014

Abend- & Nachtragas (Teil 1 ab 22:00 Uhr) – mit Hörbeispielen der indischen Violine …

Nach einem arbeitsreichen Tag wird im indischen Verständnis der späte Abend als die Zeit des “Lustig seins und der Fröhlichkeit verstanden. Diese Stimmung verkörpern die Ragagruppe von Kafi, Bageshri und Sindura Ragas. Die Abendragas wie Yaman, Shree, Marwa oder Purvi können Glückseligkeit und ein Gefühl der Lebendigkeit wecken.

Violinistin Kala Ramnath (nordindische Klassik)
Violinistin Kala Ramnath (nordindische Klassik)

Die Violine wurde erstmalig im kolonialen Indien des frühen neunzehnten Jahrhunderts eingeführt. Sie ist im südlichen Teil Indiens enthusiastisch aufgenommen worden und war bald ein integrierter Bestandteil der karnathischen, der südindischen Musik.

Obgleich das Instrument die Fähigkeit besitzt, jede Schattierung und Nuancierung der Gesangsmusik zu reproduzieren, gibt es weniger Vertreter im Norden als im Süden Indiens. Besonders aber die Frauen konnten sich auf der Violine in Indien etablieren, wie Kala Ramnath, Anupria oder Sunita, Tochter der Violinistin Minto Khaund oder Sangeeta Shankar, Kalas Cousine und Gingger, die Nichte von L. Shankar (Violine) und Tochter von Dr. L. Subramaniam (Violine), alles Vertreterinnen einer jüngeren Musikergeneration…

Sendetermine…

20. Jan 2014 – 22:00-23:58 Uhr CET (04:00-05:58 pm EST) @ TIDE Radio  (DE/HH)
(Premiere: 27. November 2006 @ Tide 96.0 FM)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Abend- & Nachtragas (Teil 2 ab 23:00 Uhr) – mit Hörbeispielen auf der Violine u. Sitar … 

Auch in Teil 2 beschaeftigt sich IMC – India meets Classic mit der Violine und ihrer herausragende Bedeutung in der indischen Klassik … Als Hörvergleich wird dem Klangbild der Violine die Interpretation von Abend- und Nachtragas auf der Sitar gegenübergestellt.

Sitarmeister Nikhil Banerjee

Sitarmeister Nikhil Banerjee

Der Sitarmeister Purbayan Chatterjee präsentiert mit der Violinisten Kala Ramnath in einem Jugal Bandi, dem indischen Duett, den Spätabendraga Bageshri, in einer Interpetation des rhythmisch-lebhaften und leichten Gesangsstils Tarana. Purbayans Lehrmeister und grosses Vorbild, Pandit Nikhil Bannerjee, wird als Solist den Spätabendraga Desh präsentieren, einer Aufnahme aus dem All India Radio Archiv.

Die Violine wurde im Ganzen im Nordteil Indiens, in der Hindustani-Musik kühler aufgenommen. Wie kein anderes Instrument aus dem Westen hat sich die Violine in der südindischen Musik etablieren können. Stilformen und Musikdarbietungen, die wir heute kennen, wurden in dem goldenen Zeitalter der südinsichen Klassik, zwischen 1750 und 1850 entwickelt (u.a. Kompositionen von Thygaraja, Dikshitar und Syama Sastri). In den Süden Indiens wurde die Violine von Baluswamy Dikshitar im frühen 19. Jahrhundert eingeführt.

Violinistin Dr. N. Rajam (südindische Klassik)

Violinistin Dr. N. Rajam (südindische Klassik)

Darum stellt IMC – India meets Classic in Teil 2 Violinisten als Vertreter der südindischen Musik vor. Dr. N. Rajam, der man den grössten Verdienst unter allen Violinistinnen Indiens für die indisch klassische Musik zusprechen kann, kombiniert die nordindische mit der südindischen Musik. Den Mitternachtsraga Malkauns auf ihrer CD RADIANT gibt es auch in der karnatischen Musik als Raga Hindolam. Sie gehören dem Bhairavi Thaat an, in der aufsteigenden wie absteigenden Skala jeweils aus 6 Noten bestehend: S – g – m – d – n – S.

Dr. N. Rajams Tochter, Sangeeta Shankar, hat mit ihrer Mutter Musikwerke aus beiden Traditoinen realisiert. IMC – India meets Classic präsentiert sie als Solistin mit dem Tablavirtuosen Ustad Zakir Hussain und Spät-Nacht-Raga Bageshree.
Die Brüder und das Violin-Duett Ganesh & Kumaresh sind zwei der führenden Künstler der südindischen, karnatischen Musik. Ganesh and Kumaresh entwickelten das Violinspiel technisch zu einem kraftvollen Ausdruck und … präsentieren aus ihrer CD Sundaram (= Schönheit) die süd-indische Form “Ragam Tanam Pallavi, mit einer eigenen Komposition von Ganesh, die dem südindischen Abendraga Vasanta entspricht. Er ist einer der ältesten Ragas in Indien, der seit mehr als 1000 Jahre gepielt wird.- Typisch in der südindischen Vokal- und Instrumentalmusik begleiten anstatt der Tabla die Mridanga, die klassische Trommel Indiens und der Ghatam, ein gefässartiger Klangkörper aus Ton.

Hinweis: Dem Thema Fusion & Weltmusik, in der die indische Violine durch herausragende Künstler wie Dr. Lakshminarayana Shankar – bekannt als L. Shankar, seinen Bruder L. Subramaniam, in seiner Heimat betitelt als “The God of Indian Violin, “The Paganini of Indian Classical Music oder dessen Schüler S. Harikumar eine grosse Bedeutung erfährt, wird sich IMC – India meets Classic in einer seiner weiteren Sondersendungen gesondert widmen.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: