IMC – India meets Classic presents …

… radio shows for Indian (Music) Culture

Archive for June, 2013

CH – Raga CDs of the Months (06/13): Imdadkhani Gharana – The Great Masters from Etawah

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 23, 2013


The term Gharana appeared different times in some of IMC OnAir’s former broadcastings. Gharana-s are a kind of music schools we can find in North and South India. Within Indian Classical music the Gharana-s are stylistic branches, interpretation forms of Ragas with characteristic ornamentics which are passed on from generation to generation, by a teacher (guru) to the pupil (shishya) in oral form.

Imdadkhani Gharana is one of the oldest schools of music of North Indian Classics (Hindustani music). It goes back to the musician and founder Imdad Khan (1848-1920) who played the Sitar and Surbahar (bass sitar). Imdad Kh. was born in Agra, his family moved to Etawa, a district in British-India close to the Yamuna river. Therefore Imdadkahni Gharani is well-known as Etawah Gharana. Today Etawah belongs to the Indian Federal State Uttar Pradesh.

dates of broadcasting…

23rd June 2013 – 04:00 p.m. EST (10:00 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(premiere: 21st March 2011 – 11:00 pm CET @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Imdad Khan eminates from a famous family of musicians. The musical family tree of the Khan family can be retraced almost 400 years. We find the roots in the district Agra, in the North Indian Federal State Uttar Pradesh.

The Imdadkhani Gharana spread over Etawah to Kolkata (former Calcutta), Hyderabad, Indore and Mumbai nearby completely through  whole India. The historical roots of the Imdadkhani Gharana go back to the 16th century, equal the family tree of the Khan clan.  The Imdadkhani Gharana developed from the Gwalior Gharana. It is one of the oldest schools of music in which vocal styles of North Indian classics developed, like the Khayal.

In the tradition of the ImdadhKhani Gharana (or Etawah Gharana) it is characteristic for the Sitar play that singing technique is converted. Designated as: Gayaki ang. By a Sitar maestro it is intended to come  close as possible to the expression strength and variety of the human voice as the leading instrument of Indian Classics. Also all other instrumentalists, e.g. on the Indian flute (Bansuri), the Indian fiddle (Sarangi) or Sarode strive for the intonation of the human voice. But as no other Indian instrument on the Sitar is played the repertoir of classical singers with the Gayaki ang.

Same as Imdad Khan his son Enayat Khan (1895-1938) was one of the most important sitarists of the early 20th century. It was Enayat’s earnings that he made the Sitar music accessible and popular for a larger audience in the cultural capital of India, in Calcutta (Kolkata). Before the Sitar was heard predominantly in a small circle by music enthusiasts. Apart from popularisation Enayat Khan developed the architecture/design of the Sitar. The Indian Nobel prize winner for literature Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) ranked among the musical companions of Enayat Khan. He died at the age of only 43 years and left four children. Two sons, the Sitar player Vilayat Khan (1928-2004) and Surbahar maestro Imrat Khan (b. 1935) became famous musicians in the tradition of the ImdadKhani Gharana.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs des Monats (06/13): Imdadkhani Gharana – Die großen Meister aus Etawah

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 23, 2013


Der Begriff Gharana ist uns in den zurückliegenden Sendungen immer wieder begegnet. Gharana-s sind eine Art Musikschulen, die man in Nord- und Südindien antrifft. Gharana-s sind stilistische Ausprägungen innerhalb der indischen Klassik, Interpretationsformen von Ragas mit charakteristischen Ornamentiken, die von Generation zu Generation, von einem Lehrer an den Schüler in mündlicher Forum weitergegeben werden.

Die Imdadkhani Gharana ist eine der ältesten Musikschulen der nordindischen Klassik, der Hindustani-Musik. Sie  geht auf den Musiker Imdad Khan zurück. Imdad Khan (1848-1920) spielte die Sitar und Surbahar. Er wurde in Agra geboren. Imdad’s Familie zog in die Stadt Etawah, einem Distrik im British-Indien am Yamuna-Fluss gelegen. So ist die Imdadkahni Gharani auch als Etawah Gharana bekannt. Heute gehört Etawah zum indischen Bundesstaat Uttar Pradesh.

Sendetermine…

23. Juni 2013 – 22:00 Uhr CET (04:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(Premiere: 21. März 2011 – 23:00 Uhr CET @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting planstreaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Imdad Khan entstammt einer berühmten Musikerfamilie. Der musikalische Stammbaum der Khanfamilie kann nahezu 400 Jahre zurückverfolgt werden. Die Wurzeln finden wir im District Agra, im nordindischen Bundesstaat Uttar Pradesh.

Die Imdadkhani Gharana hat sich über Etawah nach Kolkatta, Hyderabad, Indore und Mumbai durch ganz Indien ausgebreitet. Die geschichtlichen Wurzeln der Imdadkhani Gharana bis in’s 16. Jahrhundert zurück, gleich dem Familienstammbaum der Khanfamilie.  Die Imdadkhani Gharana hat sich aus der Gwalior Gharana entwickelt. Es ist eine der ältesten Musikschulen, in der Gesangstile der nordindischen Klassik entstanden, wie der Khayal.

Es ist die Besonderheit des Sitarspiels in der Tradition der Imdadhi Khan Gharana oder Etawah Gharana, dass man eine Gesangstechnik umsetzt. Benannt als: Gayaki ang. Von einem Sitarspieler ist es gewollt, der Ausdrucksstärke und -vielfalt der menschlichen Stimme als das herausragende Instrument der indischen Klassik möglichst nahe zu kommen. Auch alle sonstigen Instrumentalisten auf der indischen Flöte, der Bansuri, der indischen Fiddel, der Sarangi oder Sarode streben nach diesem Intonationsbild. Doch wie auf keinem anderen indischen Instrument wird auf der Sitar mit dem Gayaki Ang das Repertoir von klassischen Sängern  gespielt.

Auch Imdad’s Sohn Enayat Khan (1895-1938) war einer der bedeutendsten Sitarspieler des frühen 20sten Jahrhunderts. Es war Enayat’s Verdienst, dass er die Sitarmusik in der indischen Kulturhauptstadt Calcutta (Kolkata) einem größeren Publikum zugänglich machte. Die Sitar wurde bis dahin überwiegend in einem kleinen Kreis von Musikliebhabern gehört. Neben der Popularisierung entwickelte Enayat Khan auch die bauliche Struktur der Sitar weiter. Der indische Nobelpreisträger für Literatur, Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) zählte zu den musikalischen Weggefährten von Enayat Khan. Enayat Khan verstarb im Alter von nur 43 Jahren. Er hinterliess vier Kinder. Zwei Söhne, der Sitarspieler Vilayat (1928-2004) und Surbaharmaestro Imrat Khan (geb. 1935) wurden in der Tradition der ImdadKhani Gharana berühmte Musiker.

 

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

A – Raga CDs of the Months (06/13): Studies in Indian Classical Music (part 1)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 22, 2013

The promotion initiative IMC – India meets Classic will present the topic “Studies of Indian classical music” (part 1 and following). Beside original music from India this radio show will answer the substantial question for all those who are interested to study Indian music: “How to choose a teacher (Guru)?”. – The pro and cons of different methods of teaching will be lit up in this series considering the characteristics of instrumental play and Indian vocal styles.

At the latest since the musical discovery journeys of Menuhin and Coltrane the broader interest in studying Indian Classical music grew in the West. It is unbroken until today.

Yehudi Menuhin (Violin), Ravi Shankar (Sitar) and Alla Rakha (Tabla)The violin virtuoso Sir Yehudi Menuhin visited India in 1952 for the first time. Later Menuhin took lessons from the legendary sitar player Ravi Shankar. The modal concept of Indian Ragas is reflected also in the music of the jazz saxophonists John Coltrane. Coltrane’s composition “India” (from the jazz album “Live at the Village Vanguard”) originates from the year 1961, in which he met Ravi Shankar. Coltrane studied Indian religion and philosophy apart from Indian classics.

dates of broadcasting…
23th June 2013 – 06:00 pm EST (11:00 pm CET) @ Radio FRO (A)
(premiere: 21st December 2010 – 09:000 pm CET @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

For the approach to the musical training the new radio show orientates with two western terms. As there would be: music schools and music sciences.

In that more than 2000 years old system of Indian classical music of North and South India we find the similar term Gharana. The Gharana-s are less a kind of music schools in the Western sense. Gharana is a name for the heritage of a musical tradition which is overhanded mostly in oral form over many generations from teacher (guru) to pupil (shishya).
Gharana is derived from the Hindu word “Ghar“, i.e. family or house. There exist Gharana-s for singing, instrumental play, the Indian percussion instrument Tabla, for Indian dance and some wind and string instruments. In view of more than 30 existing Gharana-s we are limiting part 1 of our topic “Studies of Indian classical music” to the oldest singing form of the North Indian classical music: the Dhrupad.

Grandsons of Zakiruddin Khan and Allabande Khan - The Dagar Brothers ( from left to right): Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar( b1933), Ustad Nasir Zahiruddin Dagar(1932-1994), Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar(b 1927), Ustad Nasir Aminuddin Dagar(1923-2000), Ustad Zia Mohiuddin Dagar (1929-1990), Ustad Nasir Faiyazuddin Dagar(1934-1989), Ustad Hussain Sayeeduddin Dagar(b1939).

Grandsons of Zakiruddin Khan and Allabande Khan – The Dagar Brothers ( from left to right): Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar( b1933), Ustad Nasir Zahiruddin Dagar(1932-1994), Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar(b 1927), Ustad Nasir Aminuddin Dagar(1923-2000), Ustad Zia Mohiuddin Dagar (1929-1990), Ustad Nasir Faiyazuddin Dagar(1934-1989), Ustad Hussain Sayeeduddin Dagar(b1939).

The oldest music school for Dhrupad is the Dagar Gharana. It’s name refers directly to the Dagar Family (see below) which determines the development of the Dhrupad style until today, unbroken since more than 20 generations.

The term Gharana is not even as old as the family traditions. The social meaning of the Gharana-s became of relevance for the stylistic idendity of an artist in instrumental play or vocal lately in the midth of 19th  century. The Gharana-s of the Dhrupad style have a pre-history. All Gharana-s are attributed only to four lineages, the so called Bani-s (or Vani-s).  Bani means “word“, it is derived from the Sanskrit “Vani“, i.e. “voice“. The Banis are style concepts. The four Dhrupad Bani-s had been constituted by four outstanding musicians at the court of the mughal emperor Akbar (1542-1605). There are: Gaudhari Vani or named as Gohar or Gauri Vani in the tradition of the famous court musician Tansen, Khandari Vani of Samokhana Simbha (Naubad Khan), Nauhari Vani in the tradition of Shrichanda and Dangari or Dagar Vani of Vrija Chanda.

If one looks further back in the music history of India one discovers in the 7th century a link to the Bani-s. The four Bani-s of the Dhrupad had developed from seven in the core five (5) singing styles, the Geeti-s. These Geeti-s are: Suddha, Bhinna, Gauri, Vegswara and Sadharani. Gaudi Geeti is not far more in use.

(Source: The Dagar Tradition – www.dagardvani.org)
The Dagar Gharana

The Dagar family’s contribution to the perpetuation and enrichment of this art, while pre­serving its original purity, has been so precious, and the fact that the history of this family can be traced back for 20 generations without a break is so unique, that the family can be said to represent a microcosm of the history of Indian classical music.

Dhrupad reached its apogee in the 16th century, during the reign of the Moghul emperor Akbar. At that time there were four Schools of Dhrupad, representing this art in all its diversity. Brij Chand Rajput was of Dagar lineage, so the school of Dhrupad that he headed was called Dagar Vani. The other three Vanis, Khandar, Nauvahar and Gobarhar. respectively, almost disappeared in the course of time, and only in the Dagar Vani has the pure tradition of Dhrupad been maintained and brought down to our day. Until the 16th century the Dagars were Brahmins, but circumstances constrained their ancestor, Baba Gopal Das Pandey, to embrace Islam, and he came to be known as Baba Imam Khan Dagar . One of his two sons, Ustad Behram Khan Dagar, was the most famous and learned musician of his time, in the 18th and 19th centuries. During the 125 years of life that God granted him, he applied himself to the acquisition of a thorough knowledge of the Sanskrit sacred texts. He devoted the greater part of his life to the rigorous analysis of these texts in order to translate the formal musical rules into a pragmatic teaching method. He distilled the style of singing, the gayaki, to a degree of purity and clarity never known before, elaborating the alap and rendering singable the technical forms.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

A – Raga CDs des Monats (06/13): Das Studium der indisch klassischen Musik (Teil 1)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 22, 2013

Die Förderinitiative IMC- India meets Classic wird mit dem Thema “Das Studium der indisch-klassischen Musik, Teil 1″ (und Folgende) wesentliche Fragen beantworten können, worauf bei der Wahl eines Lehrers, eines Guru-s zu achten ist, dabei die Vor- und Nachteile unterschiedlicher Unterrichtsmethoden beleuchtet und dafür Besonderheiten im Instrumentalspiel oder indischen Gesang berücksichtigt werden.

Spätestens seit den musikalische Entdeckungsreisen von Menuhin und Coltrane wuchs im Westen das breitere Interesse für ein Studium der indisch-klassischen Musik. Es ist bis heute ungebrochen.

Yehudi Menuhin (Violin), Ravi Shankar (Sitar) and Alla Rakha (Tabla)Der Geigenvirtuose Sir Yehudi Menuhin besuchte 1952 erstmals Indien. Später nahm Yehudi Menuhin Unterricht bei dem legendären Sitarspieler Ravi Shankar. Das modale Konzept der indischen Ragas spiegelt sich auch in der Musik des Jazz-Saxophonisten John Coltrane wieder. Coltrane’s Komposition “India” (aus dem Jazzalbum “Live at the Village Vanguard”) stammt aus dem Jahre 1961, in dem er Ravi Shankar traf. Coltrane studierte neben der indischen Klassik auch die indische Religion und Philosophie.

Sendetermine…
23. Juni 2013 – 23:00 Uhr CET (05:00 p.m. EST)  @ Radio FRO
(Premiere: 21.12.2010 – 21:00 Uhr @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Orientieren wir uns mit zwei westlichen Begriffen für die Annäherung an die musikalische Ausbildung. Als da wären: Musikschulen und die Musikwissenschaft.

Dazu begegnet uns in dem mehr als 2000 Jahre alten System der indisch-klassischen Musik Nord- und Südindiens analog der Begriff Gharana. Die Gharana-s sind eine Art Musikschulen, weniger im westlichen Sinne. Gharana ist eine Bezeichnung für eine über viele Generationen weitervererbte, musikalische Tradition. Gharana leitet sich aus dem Hinduwort “Ghar” ab, das heisst Familie oder Haus. Es gibt Gharana-s für den Gesang, das Instrumentalspiel, für das indische Perkussionsinstrument Tabla, für den indischen Tanz und einige Blas- u. Saiteninstrumente. Angesichts der mehr als 30 existierenden Gharanas beschränken wir uns in Teil 1 unseres Themas “Das Studium der indisch-klassischen Musik” auf die älteste Gesangsform der nordindischen Klassik, den Dhrupad.

Grandsons of Zakiruddin Khan and Allabande Khan - The Dagar Brothers ( from left to right): Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar( b1933), Ustad Nasir Zahiruddin Dagar(1932-1994), Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar(b 1927), Ustad Nasir Aminuddin Dagar(1923-2000), Ustad Zia Mohiuddin Dagar (1929-1990), Ustad Nasir Faiyazuddin Dagar(1934-1989), Ustad Hussain Sayeeduddin Dagar(b1939).

Die älteste Musikschule des Dhrupad ist die Dagar-Gharana. Ihr Namensgeber, die Dagar-Familie (s.u.) bestimmt bis heute, ungebrochen seit mehr als 20 Generationen die Entwicklung des Dhrupads.

Der Begriff Gharana ist selbst gar nicht so alt wie die Familientraditionen. Ihre gesellschaftliche Bedeutung wurde für die stilistische Zuordnung eines Künstlers im Instrumentalspiel oder Gesang erst Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts ausgeprägt. Die Gharanas des Dhrupadgesangs haben eine Vorgeschichte. Alle Gharanas gehen auf nur vier (4) Abstimmungslinien zurück, die sogenannen Bani-s (oder Vani-s).  Bani bedeutet “Wort”, es leitet sich aus dem Sanskritstamm “Vani” ab, d.h. “Stimme”. Die Banis sind Stilkonzepte. Die vier Banis werden auf vier herausragende Musiker am Hofe des Moghulherrschers Akbars (1542-1605) zurückgeführt. Es sind: Gaudhari Vani, auch Gohar oder Gauri Vani genannt, sie steht in der Tradition des berühmten Hofmusikers Tansen, dann Khandari Vani von Samokhana Simbha (Naubad Khan), Nauhari Vani in der Tradition von Shrichanda und Dangari oder Dagar Vani von Vrija Chanda.

Blickt man in der Musikgeschichte Indiens weiter zurück, entdeckt man zu den Banis eine Verbindung aus dem 7. Jahrhundert. Die vier Banis des Dhrupads haben sich aus sieben bzw. im Kern fünf (5) Gesangsstilen entwickelt, den Geetis. Die Geetis sind: Suddha, Bhinna, Gauri, Vegswara und Sadharani. Gaudi Geeti ist nicht weiter mehr im Gebrauch.

(Quelle: The Dagar Tradition – www.dagardvani.org)
The Dagar Gharana

The Dagar family’s contribution to the perpetuation and enrichment of this art, while pre­serving its original purity, has been so precious, and the fact that the history of this family can be traced back for 20 generations without a break is so unique, that the family can be said to represent a microcosm of the history of Indian classical music.

Dhrupad reached its apogee in the 16th century, during the reign of the Moghul emperor Akbar. At that time there were four Schools of Dhrupad, representing this art in all its diversity. Brij Chand Rajput was of Dagar lineage, so the school of Dhrupad that he headed was called Dagar Vani. The other three Vanis, Khandar, Nauvahar and Gobarhar. respectively, almost disappeared in the course of time, and only in the Dagar Vani has the pure tradition of Dhrupad been maintained and brought down to our day. Until the 16th century the Dagars were Brahmins, but circumstances constrained their ancestor, Baba Gopal Das Pandey, to embrace Islam, and he came to be known as Baba Imam Khan Dagar . One of his two sons, Ustad Behram Khan Dagar, was the most famous and learned musician of his time, in the 18th and 19th centuries. During the 125 years of life that God granted him, he applied himself to the acquisition of a thorough knowledge of the Sanskrit sacred texts. He devoted the greater part of his life to the rigorous analysis of these texts in order to translate the formal musical rules into a pragmatic teaching method. He distilled the style of singing, the gayaki, to a degree of purity and clarity never known before, elaborating the alap and rendering singable the technical forms.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the months (06/13): Mangala Snaanam – Mangala Isai – No Indian Wedding without the Nahdaswaram

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 19, 2013

! !  N o t i c e   t h e   b r o a d c a s t i n g   t  i m e s   i n   2 0 1 3   ! !
Indian E-music every 1st Friday (02:00 pm EST), 2nd Friday (04:00 pm EST) and 4th Saturday (05:oo pm EST)
IMC – India meets Classic every 1st, 2nd & 4th Thursday (3:00 pm EST), 3rd Monday (4:00-6:00 pm EST), 3rd Sunday (9:00-11:00 am EST)

Mangala Snaanam – Mangala Isai  (Holy Bath – Holy Music)… No Indian wedding without the Nadhaswaram.

Nadhaswaram Troupe in HYDERABAD @ The Hindu (http://bit.ly/6xO6b0)

Under all the different Indian instruments we meet up the Nadhaswaram. It is world-wide the loudest, non metallic acoustical instrument, comparable with the volume of a trumpet. This wind instrument belongs to the group of the aerophones and is played mainly in South India (see Carnatic music). The Mukhavina is the much smaller version (10 cm) used for folk music. In North Indian Classical music (Hindustani) exists the relative of the Nadhaswaram, the Shehnai.

In India the Nadhaswaram or Nagaswaram is counted as an auspicious wind instrument – Mangala Vadya. Hardly any other instrument in Indian classics is in its character so close to the human voice.

dates of broadcasting…
20th June 2013 – 03:00 pm EST (09:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(premiere: 19th January 2010 – 09:00 p.m. CET @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

An important role for the origin of the Nadhaswaram plays the Tiruvarur district in the South Indian Federal State Tamil-Nadu. Over many centuries Tiruvarur was a cultural center. The ancient city Tiruvarur is famous for the Sri Tyagaraja Tempel.

From Tiruvarur the tradition has its seed that two Nadhaswarm players are accompanied by two percussionists on the Thavil (barrel drum).

Thavil and Nadhaswaram are substantial components of the traditional celebrations and ceremonies in South India. With its impressing volume the Nadhaswaram usually is played out of doors.

The holy music (Mangala Isai) has great importance in Hindu temples and for further areas of Indian life. A colourful potpourrie of Indian music, traditional forms, folk music up to contemporary styles we find at an Indian Wedding ceremony.

Nadhaswaram Duo accompanied by 2 Thavil players – Source: Wikipedia (ENG):
Mambalam M. K. S. Siva & Sri K. Durga Prasad (Nadhaswaram), Sri P. Arulanandan & Sri V. M. Palanivel (Thavil)

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (06/13): Mangala Snaanam – Mangala Isai… keine indische Hochzeit ohne das Nahdaswaram

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 19, 2013

! !   S e n d e z e i t e n    i n  2 0 1 3 ! !
Indian E-music jeden 1. Freitag (20:00), 2. Freitag (22:00), 2. Donnerstag (21:00) und 4. Samstag (23:00)
IMC – India meets Classic jeden 1., 3. und 4. Donnerstag (21:00), 3. Montag (22:00-24:00) und 3. Sonntag (15:00-17:00)

Mangala Snaanam – Mangala Isai (Heiliges Bad – Heilige Musik)… keine indische Hochzeit ohne das Nadhaswaram.

Nadhaswaram Troupe in HYDERABAD @ The Hindu (http://bit.ly/6xO6b0)

Unter den indischen Instrumenten treffen wir auf das Nadhaswaram. Es ist weltweit das lauteste, nicht metallene akkustische Instrument, vergleichbar mit der Lautstärke einer Trompete. Dieses Blasinstrument aus der Gruppe der s.g. Aerophone wird in Südindien (s.a. Karnatische Musik) gespielt. Die viel kleinere Ausführung Mukhavina (10 cm) wird für die Volksmusik verwendet. In der nordindischen Klassik, der Hindustani-Musik treffen wir auf einen Verwandten des Nadhaswaram, die Shehnai.

Das Nadhaswaram oder auch Nagaswaram gilt in Indien als ein glückverheissendes Blasinstrument – Mangala Vadya (wind instrument). Es kommt wie kaum ein anderes Instrument in der indischen Klassik der menschlichen Stimme am Nächsten.

Sendetermine…
20. Juni 2013 – 21:00 Uhr CET (03:00 pm EST) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(Premiere: 19. Januar 2010 – 21:00 CET @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Eine bedeutende Rolle für die Herkunft des Nadhaswaram spielt die Kreisstadt Tiruvarur im südindischen Bundesstaat Tamil-Nadu. Über viele Jahrhunderte war der Tiruvarurdistrict ein kulturelles Zentrum. Die antike Stadt Tiruvarur ist berühmt für den Sri Tyagaraja Tempel.
Aus Tiruvarur stammt die Tradition, dass zwei Nadhaswarm-Spieler von zwei Perkussionisten auf der Thavil (Fasstrommel) begleitet werden.

Thavil und Nadhaswaram sind wesentlicher Bestandteil der traditionellen Feste und Zeremonien in Südindien. Mit seiner beeindruckenden Lautstärke spielt man das Nadhaswaram meist im Freien.
Die heilige Musik (Mangala Isai) hat in den hinduistischen Tempeln und auch weiteren Lebensbereichen der Inder grosse Bedeutung. Ein ganzes Potpourrie indischer Musik, von der traditionellen Form, Volksmusik bis zu zeitgenössischen Stilrichtungen finden wir auf einer indischen Hochzeit.

Nadhaswaram Duo accompanied by 2 Thavil players – Source: Wikipedia (ENG):
Mambalam M. K. S. Siva & Sri K. Durga Prasad (Nadhaswaram), Sri P. Arulanandan & Sri V. M. Palanivel (Thavil)
Unter den indischen Instrumenten treffen wir auf das Nadhaswaram. Es ist weltweit
das lauteste, nicht metallene akkustische Instrument, vergleichbar mit der Lautstärke
einer Trompete. Dieses Blasinstrument wird in Südindien gespielt. Die viel kleinere
Ausführung Mukhavina (10 cm) wird für die Volksmusik verwendet. In der
nordindischen Klassik, der Hindustani-Musik treffen wir auf einen Verwandten des
Nadhaswaram, die Shehnai.

Das Nadhaswaram oder auch Nagaswaram gilt in Indien als ein glückverheissendes
Blasinstrument – Mangala Vadya (wind instrument). 

Das Nadhaswaram kommt wie kaum ein anderes Instrument in der indischen Klassik
der menschlichen Stimme am Nächsten.

Eine bedeutende Rolle für die Herkunft des Nadhaswaram spielt die Kreisstadt
Tiruvarur im südindischen Bundesstaat Tamil-Nadu. Über viele Jahrhunderte war der
Tiruvarurdistrict ein kulturelles Zentrum. Die antike Stadt Tiruvarur ist berühmt für den
Sri Tyagaraja Tempel.
Ebenfalls aus Tiruvarur stammt die Tradition, dass zwei Nadaswarm-Spieler von zwei
Perkussionisten auf der Thavil begleitet werden.

Thavil und Nadaswaram sind wesentlicher Bestandteil der traditionellen Feste und
Zeremonien in Südindien. Mit seiner beeindruckenden Lautstärke spielt man das
Nadaswaram meist im Freien.
Die heilige Musik (Mangala Isai) hat in den hinduistischen Tempeln und auch
weiteren Lebensbereichen der Inder grosse Bedeutung. Ein ganzes Potpourrie
indischer Musik, von der traditionellen Form, Volksmusik bis zu zeitgenössischen
Stilrichtungen finden wir auf einer indischen Hochzeit.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs of the months (06/13): Music & Language

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 15, 2013

!! Broadcasting Dates in 2013 – Programme Calendar as PDF Download  or iCal  !!

The relationship between music and language, between sounds and the spoken word or vocals is a very special one.

Busto di Pitagora. Copia romana di originale greco. Musei Capitolini, Roma.

Busto di Pitagora. Copia romana di originale greco. Musei Capitolini, Roma. (Source: Wikipedia (ENG))

The grammarians of Sanskrit, the ancient Indian science language regard music and language as divergent aspects of one and the same phenomena.

With Indian classial music (Hindustani, Carnatic) there is a multiplicity in common under the topic to “music and language “, which is the bases of the occidental harmonics, dated back to the founder of the mathematical analysis of music by Pythagoras of Samos who had evidenced empirically the harmonic intervals – approximately written before 500 B.C. .

Music seems to be reflected far less vaguely in us than it had been granted so far. Rather our perceptions of sounds are defined very exactly by outlined possibilities and borders. The audiomental system has greater importance than one had assumed recently.

dates of broadcasting…

17th  June 2013 – 10:00 pm – 12:00 am CET (04:00-06:00 pm EST) @ Tide Radio (DE)
16th June 2013 – 09:00-11:00 am EST (
03:00-05:00 pm CET) @ radio multicult.fm (DE
)
(premiere: 16th March 2010 (part 1) | 20th April 2010 – 09:00 pm CET @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

As shown by recent studies the perception of music and ‘music making’ incorporate nearby almost all regions of the brain. The widespread acceptance that music is processed in the right brain hemisphere and language in the left had completely been wrong. The current research shows that language and music are assimilated almost identically. The profound emotional content of music, from felicity to sadness affects particularly stimulating our brain and also produces frequently physically intensively perceptible reactions to the listener.

Music settles visibly in our life, in brain activities which are measurable nowadays and made vividly visible with modern medical imaging techniques e.g. (functional) magnetic resonance tomography (MRT) or Magnetoencephalography (MEG), see picture below.

In part 1 (09:00-10:00 am EST) IMC – India meets Classic presents the structure of music & language. The  following part 2 (10:00-11:00 am EST) will bring light up the social psychological meaning of music for individual and community interaction processes influenced by the nature of music as communication form.

Stefan Koelsch: Nature Neuroscience 7(3), 2004: Music, Language and Meaning: Brain Signatures of Semantic Processing

Stefan Koelsch: Nature Neuroscience 7(3), 2004: Music, Language and Meaning: Brain Signatures of Semantic Processing

short paper (pdf: German | English)

Note: IMC OnAir’s radio show “music and language” in two parts (2x 58 min.) represents a fundamental introduction regarding the multiplicity of sciences involved (music ethnology,  anthropology, language and social sciences, neuro sciences, psychology, computer sciences (artificial intelligence) among others).

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

DE – Raga CDs des Monats (06/13): MUSIK & SPRACHE

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 15, 2013

!! Sendetermine in 2013 – Neuer Programmkalender als Download  o. iCal  !!

Die Beziehung zwischen Musik und Sprache, zwischen Klang und gesprochenem oder gesungenem Wort ist eine Besondere. Die Grammatiker des Sanskrits, der alten indischen Wissenschaftssprache, betrachten Musik und Sprache als divergierende Aspekte ein und desselben Phänomens.

Busto di Pitagora. Copia romana di originale greco. Musei Capitolini, Roma.

Busto di Pitagora. Copia romana di originale greco. Musei Capitolini, Roma. (Source: Wikipedia (ENG))

Mit der indisch klassischen Musik (Hindustani, Carnatic) gibt es eine Vielzahl von Gemeinsamkeiten unter der Überschrift “Musik und Sprache“, die auch die Grundlagen der abendländischen Harmonielehre sind, deren Beginn man mit dem Begründer der mathematischen Analyse der Musik – Pythagoras von Samos – und seinen empirischen Beweisführung der harmonischen Intervalle auf etwa mehr als 500 Jahre vor Christi Geburt datieren kann.

Musik scheint sich weit weniger diffus in uns abzubilden, als bisher angenommen. Vielmehr wird unsere Wahrnehmung von Tönen durch sehr genau umrissene Möglichkeiten und Grenzen definiert. Dem audiomentalen System kommt eine weit aus größere Bedeutung zu, als man bis vor Kurzem angenommen hatte.

Sendetermine…

17. Juni 2013  – 22:00-24:00 Uhr (04:00-06:00 pm EST) @ TIDE Radio
16. Juni 2013 
15-17:00 Uhr CET (9:00-11:00 am EST) @ radio multicult.fm (DE)
(Premiere: 16.03.2010 (Teil 1) u. 20.04.2010 (Teil 2) – 21:00 @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

In Teil 1 (15:02-16:00) stellt IMC – India meets Classic die Struktur von Musik und Sprache dar. In Teil 2 (16:02-17:00) werden die sozialpsychologische Bedeutung von Musik für das Individuum und seine Interaktionsprozesse aus seiner geschichtlichen Entwicklung und aus dem Wesen der Musik näher beleuchten.

Die Wahrnehmung von Musik und das aktiv Musizieren, das zeigen uns jüngste Studien, beziehen nahezu alle Regionen des Gehirns mit ein. Die weitverbreitete Annahme, dass Musik in der rechten Gehirnhälfte und Sprache in der linken Gehirnhälfte verarbeitet wird, war schlichtweg falsch. Die aktuellen Forschungen zeigen auch, dass Sprache und Musik nahezu gleich verarbeitet werden. Der tiefgreifende, emotionale Gehalt der Musik, von Glückseligkeit bis zur Traurigkeit wirkt besonders stimulierend auf unser Gehirn mit für den Musikhörenden häufig körperlich intensiv wahrnehmbaren Reaktionen.

Musik schlägt sich sichtbar in unserem Leben nieder, in Gehirnaktivitäten, die heute mit modernen, bildgebenden Verfahren messbar sind und mit der (funktionellen) Magnetresonanz-Tomographie (MRT) oder  Magnetenzephalographie (MET) plastisch sichtbar gemacht werden können (Bild s. u.).

Stefan Koelsch: Nature Neuroscience 7(3), 2004: Music, Language and Meaning: Brain Signatures of Semantic Processing

Stefan Koelsch: Nature Neuroscience 7(3), 2004: Music, Language and Meaning: Brain Signatures of Semantic Processing

short paper (pdf: German | English)

Hinweis: Die 2-teilige IMC-Sendung “Musik und Sprache” (2x 58 min.) stellt angesichts der Vielzahl der beteiligten Wissenschaften (Musikethnologie, Anthropologie, Sprach- u. Sozialwissenschaften, Neuro-Sciences, Psychologie, Computerwissenschaften (künstliche Intelligenz) u.a. ) eine grundlegende Einführung dar.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs of the Months (06/13): Ragas in Sufi Music.

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 9, 2013

Ragas in Sufi Music
– Sufiana Kalam | Words of Sufi Sages

Schalal ad-Din Rumi (Wikipedia)

1207-1237: Schalal ad-Din Rumi (Wikipedia)

First scriptures about sufism and practices had been written in 1st centurey AD.  The golden era of sufism war between the 13th and 16th century. It had been it’s zenith.

In Western countries the sufism is associated with the dancing dervish (Turkish Mevlevi Order) going back to the Persian theologian, poet, advocate and sufi mystic Schalal ad-Din Rumi (1207-1273).
The dervishs put themselfs into ecstasy by their rotations. This ritual exercise is called dhikr, in commemoration of God. Its an intensive worship of Allah with  renunciation of the worldly.

Music herefore can be part of spiritual exercises. Sufi Rumi described already in the 13th century that music, dance and poetry are helpful for concentration on the divine and renewing the soul. With singing accompanied by instruments God is called. It is sung about the love for God and the prophet Mohammed.

dates of broadcasting…

10th June 2013 – 04:00 pm EST (10:00 pm CET) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(21st February 2011 – 11:00 pm (CET) @ TIDE Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Etymologically sufismus probably has its roots in suf (wool) and safa (purity) . With the entrance into the sufi order a woolen robe is overhanded to a Sufi  within an initiation ritual.

Pure Sufis  turn away from an earthly life keeping free of any seductions and emotions like pride, arrogance, envy or wrong hopes for a long life. It’s the fight against the despotic ego to reach an-nafs al-safiya, which is the “pure soul” as the highest level, always beyond that of the prophet.  More important than self-abandonment is love. Living a life truthfully, the heart free of hate and reisting against culinary allurements. The love for God is the postulate for the reunion with God which is possible already this life. Sufism is the inner relationship between the loving one, the Sufi and the beloved God.

The Arabean, Islamic world and different cultures from South and East Europe had influenced each other ove rmany centuries alternately, e.g. between the 6th and 12th century in the muslim oriented Spain. In the modern Europe the term sufism was known lately in the 19th century. The Indian musician and mystic Hazrat Inayat Khan founded the International Sufi Order, in 1917 in London. At the end of the 20th century the sufi orders increasingly became accessable for non muslims. It is defined as a “universal  sufism” without any direct link to the Islam, where all religions are welcome.

In sufi music on the Indian sub continent the vocal in Qawwali style is an expressive form. In Arabean  Qaul means “expression of the prophet”. The Qawwali is established in Muslim regions like North and West Pakistan, Punjab, Hyderabad and same in Bangladesh and in Kashmir.

Amir Khusrow surrounded by young men. Miniature from a manuscript of Majlis Al-Usshak by Husayn Bayqarah (Wikipedia)

Amir Khusrow surrounded by young men. Miniature from a manuscript of Majlis Al-Usshak by Husayn Bayqarah (Wikipedia)

As Lyrical form of the Qawwali  mostly is used the Ghazal. The content expresses the emotional desire for the reunion with the divine and the joy at the love of God. The origin of the Qawwali is rooted in the 8th century, in the Persian area (nowadays: Afghanistan and Iran). The Qawwali form as we know it today matured in India in the late 13th century. The Sufi Amir Khusro Dehelvi linked both Persian and Indian music traditions. Amir Khusro belonged to the Chistiya Sufi Order.

Since the Turkish conquest in South Asia all over the Indian Sub continent established a multiplicity of  Sufi Orders, from Delhi to South India: Moinuddin Chishtiya, Nagshbandi, Suhrawardiyah and Qadiriyaah.

By modern medias the sufism experiences world wide interests, especially from non muslims. These days everybody can obtain an opinion about sufism by himself. The first scriptures  about sufism from the 1st century (‘Kashf al-Mahjub of Hujwiri ‘ and ‘Risala of Qushayri’) are available in English translations.

Posted in ENG (English), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

CH – Raga CDs des Monats (06/13): Ragas in der Sufi-Musik

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on June 9, 2013

Ragas in der Sufi– Musik
– Sufiana Kalam | Worte der Sufi-Weisen

Schalal ad-Din Rumi (Wikipedia)

1207-1237: Schalal ad-Din Rumi (Wikipedia)

Erste Schriften über den Sufismus und seinen Praktiken wurden im 1. Jahrhundert nach Christi Geburt verfasst. Das Goldene Zeitalter des Sufisum war zwischen dem 13. und 16. Jahrhundert. Es war seine intellektuelle Hochzeit.

Den Sufismus bringt man im Westen mit den tanzenden Derwischen (türkischer Mevlevi-Orden) in Verbindung. Der Mevlevi-Orden geht auf den persischen Theologen, Poeten, Juristen und Sufi-Mystiker Schalal ad-Din Rumi (1207-1273) zurück. Die Derwische versetzen sich mit ihren kreisenden Bewegungen in Ekstase. Diese rituelle Übung nennt man Dhikr, das Gedenken an Gott. Es ist eine intensive Anbetung Allahs. mit Abkehr von dem Weltlichen.

Die Musik kann dafür auch Bestandteil der spirituellen Übung sein. Im 13. Jahrhundert beschrieb der Sufi Rumi (1207-1273), dass Musik, Poesie und Tanz dazu verhelfen können, sich auf das Göttliche zu konzentrieren und die Seele zu erneuern. Mit Gesängen, die instrumental begleitet werden, wird Gott angerufen. Die Liebe zu Gott bzw. zum Propheten Mohammed wird besungen.

Sendetermine…

10th June 2013 – 22:00 Uhr CET (04:00 pm EST) @ Radio RaSA (CH)
(Premiere: 21. Febr 2011 – 23:00 Uhr CET @ Tide Radio)
broadcasting plan | streaming (Internet Radio & Mobile Radio) | podCast

Etymologisch betrachtet leitet sich Sufismus sehr wahrscheinlich aus dem Wortstamm Suf (Wolle) und Safa (Reinheit) ab. Beim Eintritt in den Sufi-Orden wurden in einem Initationsritus einem Sufi wollene Umhänge übergeben.

Ein echter Sufi wendet sich vom weltlichen Leben ab und macht sich von allen Verführungen und Emotionen frei, wie Stolz, Arroganz, Neid oder falsche Hoffnungen auf ein langes Leben. Es ist der Kampf gegen das tyrannische Ego, um an-nafs al-safiya zu erlangen, die “reine Seele” als die höchste Stufe, immer aber unterhalb des Propheten. Wichtiger als die Selbstaufgabe ist die Liebe. Ein Leben wahrheitsgetreu zu führen, das Herz frei von Hass zu halten und sich kulinarischen Verführungen zu widersetzen. Die Liebe zu Gott ist die Voraussetzung für die Vereinigung mit Gott, bereits im Diesseits möglich. Der Sufismus ist eine innere Beziehung zwischen dem Liebenden, dem Sufi und dem Geliebten, Gott.

Die arabische, islamische Welt und verschiedenen Kulturen aus Süd- und Osteuropa beeinflußten sich über viele Jahrhunderte wechselseitig, zwischen dem 6. und 12. Jahrhundert im muslimisch-orientierten Spanien. Im moderneren Europa haben wir das Wort Sufismus erst im 19. Jahrhundert kennengelernt. Von dem indischen Musiker und Mystiker Hazrat Inayat Khan wurde in London der internationale Sufi Orden gegründet, im Jahre 1917. Die Sufi-Ordnen öffneten sich zum Ende des 20. Jahrhundets zunehmen auch Nicht-Muslimen. Wir sprechen hier von einem “universellen Sufismus” ohne direkten Bezug zum Islam, in der alle Religionen ihren Platz finden.

In der Sufi-Musik ist auf dem indischen Subkontinent der Gesang im Qawwali-Stile eine Ausdrucksform. Im Arabischen bedeutet Qaul die “Äusserung des Propheten”. Der Qawwali ist besonders verbreitet in

Amir Khusrow surrounded by young men. Miniature from a manuscript of Majlis Al-Usshak by Husayn Bayqarah (Wikipedia)

Amir Khusrow surrounded by young men. Miniature from a manuscript of Majlis Al-Usshak by Husayn Bayqarah (Wikipedia)

muslimisch geprägten Regionen wie Nord- und Westpakistan, dem Punjab, Hyderabad, aber auch in Bangladesh und im Kashmir. Als Gedichtform des Qawwali verwendet man meist den Ghazal. Die Inhalte bringen das seelische Verlangen nach der Vereinigung mit dem Göttlichen und der Freude an der Liebe des Göttlichen zum Ausdruck. Der Ursprung des Qawwali ist das 8. Jahrhundert, im persischen Raum (heutiges Afghanistan und Iran). Die uns bekannte Form des Qawwali reifte in Indien im späten 13. Jahrhundert. Es war der Sufi Amir Khusro Dehelvi, der die persische und indische Musiktradition zusammenbrachte. Amir Khusro gehörte dem Chistiya-Sufiorden an.

Seit der Türkischen Eroberung in Südasien haben sich auf dem ganzen indischen Subkontinent eine Vielzahl von Sufi-Orden etabliert, von Delhi bis nach Südindien: Moinuddin Chishtiya, Nagshbandi, Suhrawardiyah u. Qadiriyaah.

Mit den modernen Kommunikationsmedien erfährt der Sufismus ein weltweites Interesse, besonders aus Kreisen der Nicht-Muslime… heutzutage kann sich jeder selbst eine Meinung über den Sufismus bilden. Die ersten Schriften über den Sufismus aus dem 1sten Jahrhundert (‘Kashf al-Mahjub of Hujwiri ‘ und ‘Risala of Qushayri’) liegen in englischer Übersetzung vor.

Posted in DE (German), IMC OnAir - News | Leave a Comment »

 
%d bloggers like this: