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Archive for July, 2011

Newsbullet.in: Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Khan Dagar dies…

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 29, 2011

NewsBullet.in | Indo-Asian News Service
Friday, 29 July 2011 11:38

Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Khan Dagar (Source: Starnews.in)

Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Khan Dagar (Source: Starnews.in)

New Delhi: A golden voice of Indian classical music has fallen silent with the death of Ustad Rahim Fahimudddin Dagar, a doyen of the Dhrupad school who was said to be a descendent of legendary Mughal musician Tansen‘s guru. He was 84.

Dagar died on Wednesday night after battling a long illness at a private hospital, dealing a blow to one of India’s oldest musical ‘gharanas’ that he and his illustrious clan was instrumental in taking to younger audiences across the country and abroad. Dagar had been admitted to hospital on April 23 after a paralytic attack.

The vocalist was a senior exponent of the Dagar Vani Dhrupad school of music. He kept the historic legacy of dhrupad alive with unforgettable performances spanning more than the last six decades. Dagar is survived by a wife and a daughter.

He was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 2008 and was honoured with the Sangeet Natak Akademi Ratna Puraskar in 2010. He was born in Alwar, Rajasthan, in 1927.

(Source: 29 July 2011 | Newsbullet.in)

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Fahimuddin Dagar’s death ends chapter in Indian music (Obituary)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 29, 2011

29. Juli 2011 10:53:16 by IANS

New Delhi, July 29 (IANS) Indian classical music exponent and descendant of the guru of legendary musician Tansen, the late Ustad Rahim Fahimudddin Dagar, kept the historic legacy of Dhrupad alive with unforgettable performances spanning more than six decades.

Fahimudddin, who died Wednesday at the age of 84, and his illustrious clan – the Dhrupad musicians – were instrumental in taking Dhrupad, one of the oldest forms of Indian music, to younger audiences across the country and abroad.

Son of Ustad Rahimuddin Dagar, Fahimudddin was born in Alwar, Rajasthan in 1927.

He was initiated into music by his uncles Ziauddin Khan Dagar, Ustad Hussainuddin Khan Dagar (known as Tansen Pandey) and Ustad Imaumddin Khan Dagar. He learnt Sanskrit from his father as well as instructor Giridharilal Shastri. His uncle Ustad Nasiruddin Khan Dagar tied the sacred thread -genda- on him to allow him the rite of passage into the Dagar Dhrupad gharana.

He spent 35 years training in classical music and 12 years studying the rudra veena.

Fahimuddin loved children and the company of pets. “At home, he would usually laugh and spend time with his grand children and play with his pet cats,” a family member recalled.

He moved out of Alwar in his early youth and lived in Delhi. Later, he located to a government apartment at Sector 12 in R.K. Puram.

The maestro was the driving force behind the SPIC-MACAY classical music movement to promote traditional Indian music among the Gen Next and Gen Y.

In his peer group, the ‘ustad’ was known for expansive nature and his erudition.

Fahimudddin’s forte was his spontaneous and richly textured ‘alaap’ – the melodious and free-wheeling introduction to the core symphony of the raga. His repertoire was a heritage booty with some of the compositions dating back to the 12th and 13th country.

Fahimudddin was honoured with the Padma Bhushan, the Sangeet Natak Akademi Ratan Puraskar, Meyar Foundation award, Kalidas Samman, Ustad Hafiz Ali Khan award, Sahitya Kala Parishad award and the Nada Lifetime Achievement award.

The Dagarvani, a particular style of music that the Dagar family popularised, was an innovation of the alaap and brought to play every note in the ‘raga’ in all the three registers. There was a feeling of expansiveness to the notes, which were divided into several microtones called ‘ananta sruti’.

Known for the power and spontaneity of his alaap, Fahimudddin’s skill carried him to global audiences at a time when Indian music was just becoming popular internationally.

The maestro said earlier: “In the beginning, there were four forms – ‘chhanda’, ‘prabandha’, ‘dhruva’ and ‘matha’…These then gave way to four styles – ‘dhadhoo roop’, ‘miras roop’ and ‘jog roop’. These styles later gave way to ‘banis’ – ‘dagar bani (from which the lineage of the musician draws its name)’, ‘khandar bani’, ‘nauhar bani’ and ‘gauhar bani’.”

“The development and continuous additions and modifications were made by legendary sages like Nayak Gopal, Nayak Baiju and Swami Haridas Dagar. One of the most loyal votary of the ‘gayaki’ was Raja Mansingh Tomar of Gwalior,” he said in an interview.

“Our ancestor was Swami Haridas Dagar, who was also the guru of Tansen,” Fahimudddin said.

The Dhrupad gharana was founded by Ustad Bairam Khan, a north Indian Brahmin who converted to Islam.

(Source: 07/29/2011 – Thaindian.com | Newsportal – IANS)

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OutLookIndia.com: Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Khan Dagar (1927-2011)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 28, 2011

Sumati Mehrishi has a tribute in the Pioneer:

Losing him comes with the same burden as losing a sacred scripture would.

Fahimji — as he was fondly known was a colossal storehouse of compositions on Durga, Shiva, Ganesha and other deities and a treasure trove of music literature. Fahimji was where spirituality and art met — and the sacred, secular character of Hindustani music and religiosity converged.

The picture frame of Mecca Sharif hung on the wall over his head, there was something very surreal about the way he would sing his favourite Baghambar Ambar Trishul Dharani (a compostion dedicated to Durga describing her own grace and the gait of her gorgeous lion) while fixing the tanpura zawahri, plucking pieces of thread to tune his tanpura at his riyaz room. He would say, “Ab duniya ko kaun samjhaye, sab dharm ke chakkar mein pade hain. My ancestors were all Hindus. Girdhari Nath Pande, the foremost in the family tree was a musician at Babar’s court. His sons learnt from Swami Haridas. They were musicians at Akbar’s court. They fell under the influence of Sufism and were renamed. The connections between the two spiritual thoughts influenced our music.”

…Ustad Wasifuddin Dagar, the Dhrupad exponent remembers him as the granddad of not only the Dagar family but that of Dhrupad and Khayal as well. He says, “His passing away is a loss to the entire music fraternity and not just the Dagars. He was a treasure of knowledge. Plus, he was loved by all. At times, when he would come home, he would have so many people greeting him that he would get tired. He would say, ‘Haan adaab ho gaya, chalo chalo’.”

Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar the 19th generation Khalifa of the musical lineage known as the Dagar Gharana, that kept alive the tradition of Dhrupad, died last night.

“In the words of my ancestor Baba Behram Khan Dagar, dhrupad, as presented within our dagar bani, is ‘ragatmak-swaratmak, shabdatmak-varnatmak, talatmak-layatmak and rasatmak. The singer has to portray its kalatmak, vidyatmak and adhyatmak aspects to do proper justice to it.”


Photo Courtesy: Dhrupad.Info

The eight grandsons of Zakiruddin Khan and Allabande Khan — Dagar Brothers ( from left to right): Ustad Zia Fariduddin Dagar( b1933), Ustad Nasir Zahiruddin Dagar(1932-1994), Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar(1927-2011), Ustad Nasir Aminuddin Dagar(1923-2000), Ustad Zia Mohiuddin Dagar (1929-1990), Ustad Nasir Faiyazuddin Dagar(1934-1989), Ustad Hussain Sayeeduddin Dagar(b1939) —are credited with keeping the Dhrupad tradition alive

Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar was

the only living son of the illustrious musician Padma Bhushan Ustad Allabande Rahimuddin Khan Dagar who passed away in 1975. The young Rahim Fahimuddin was trained in music by his father for more than 35 years, but it was Ustad Rahimuddin Khan’s elder brother and legendary Ustad Nasiruddin Khan Dagar who initiated Rahim Fahimuddin into the art by tying the symbolic thread of discipleship on his wrist at the age of five. The promising pupil responded by devoting the next 14 years of his life to the single-minded practice of the elements of voice culture, entailing the mastery of the 12 alankaars and the 40 kriyas associated with them.

By virtue of his readiness to sit for long hours in the company of his illustrious elders and his patience to endure the rigorous lessons imparted by them, Rahim Fahimuddin could win their hearts and they taught him unreservedly. For a full twelve years he studied the Rudra Veena with his uncle Ustad Ziauddin Khan Dagar. He also took occasional lessons from his other uncles Ustad Hussainuddin Khan Dagar (better known as Tansen Pandey) and Ustad Imamuddin Khan Dagar. Rahim Fahimuddin learnt Sanskrit from his father and Pt. Girdharilal Shastri and acquired the ability to recite Sanskrit texts properly.

Read more from a two-year old interview with Anjana Rajan of the Hindu:

My name is Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar. I am a Muslim, but my goal is music. I have made a study of Durga, of the shastras. Because these help me in the pursuit of my goal. If we look for the essence with a pure mind, we will find it…

[T]he Dhrupad Society is engaged in preserving Hindu culture — since Dhrupad, the veena, the pakhawaj and the flute are all part of Vaishnav tradition. Khayal and other musical genres, on the other hand, have their origins in Muslim traditions…

The goal of Indian music is to attain moksha — liberation from mortal life. Swar (the practice of musical notes) is considered the shortest way to achieve this. The reason is simple. Swar cannot be seen. The atma or soul cannot be seen. Neither can Ishwar (the Supreme Power). So naturally, the niraakar (formless) will be attained only through the niraakar. The Sanskrit verse talks of Devi’s fingers dancing on the veena. And dance is feeling itself. This is Matangi, the goddess of music. You need faith in God to pursue this kind of path. I am not simply quoting others. Once I was listening to my elders, and they said, as you tread this path, one day the things you hear now will blossom in your understanding. Wah! Subhanallah! That is what happened. Now I say these things with complete conviction. This is a path to wisdom. That’s why Dhrupad is a whole education. It’s not merely Sa Ri Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni Sa — though of course you have to go through the abc.

There’s a selection of (alas, a very few) recordings on e-snips

An interview:

(Source:  Thu, Jul 28, 2011 at 10:54PM – OUTLOOKIndia.com – OUTLOOK Blogs / Sundeep Dougal)

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Dhrupad Maestro Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar passes away

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 28, 2011

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Dhrupad Maestro Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar passes away

SANGEET NATAK AKADEMI-Condolence Resolution

Dhrupad Maestro Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar passes away in New Delhi on 27th July 2011-The Sangeet Natak Akademi and its associate bodies deeply mourn the sad demise of Dhrupad maestro Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar, Fellow of the Akademi, who passed away at New Delhi on 27 July 2011.
Born in 1927 in Alwar, Rajasthan, Shri Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar hailed from an eminent family of Dhrupad musicians. He was initiated into music by his illustrious father Ustad Allahbande Rahimuddin Khan Dagar, and was later trained under Shri Nasiruddin Dagar, Imamuddin Dagar, and Hussainuddin Dagar. He was also trained in the Rudra Veena by Shri Ziauddin Khan Dagar.

Among the most respected masters of Dhrupad, Shri Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar was known for the power and spontaneity of his alap, and for his rich repertoire of traditional bandishes, some of which date back to the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Over a long concert career, he had distinguished himself by the quality of his raga-elaboration and his mastery over rhythm.A frequent performer on All India Radio and Doordarshan, Shri Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar presented his music in festivals all over the country. He also performed abroad. Well known as a teacher, he had taught at Rabindra Bharati University in Kolkata. The Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, New Delhi, prepared a special documentation on his art.

He had been honoured with the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award in 1993, the Sahitya Kala Parishad Samman in 1996, the Bihar Dhrupad Ratna award in 2002, the Rajasthan Sangeet Natak Akademi Award in 2003, the Padma Bhushan in 2008. For his outstanding contribution to Hindustani music, Shri Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar was elected Fellow of Sangeet Natak Akademi this year.

With the passing away of Ustad Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar, the world of Indian music has lost a legendary musician, who will be remembered for years to come.

(Source: 07/28/2011 – Sagar Global Media Consultant)

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press release: The Media Caravan pushes along… Radio FRO & FRS collaborate and take care of Indian music culture (07/25/2011)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 25, 2011

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Presseerklärung: Die Medien Caravan zieht weiter… Radio FRO & FRS nehmen sich gemeinsam des Themas Indien an (25/07/2011)

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 25, 2011

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Art must go beyond market dictates: Ansari

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 23, 2011

New Delhi, Jul 22 (PTI) Criticising commercialisation of indigenous forms of art, Vice President Hamid Ansari today said the challenge for its conservation lay in going beyond the dictates of the market.

We must continue our effort to preserve that which makes us Indian ? to be able to enjoy Indian art, sing, dance and play music as our ancestors did,” Ansari said while addressing the investiture ceremony of Sangeet Natak Akademi.

Talking about the challenges in the fields of art and music, Ansari said, “The challenge is to be able to go beyond the dictates of what can loosely be termed ”the market”. The form, format and grammar of art itself is sought to be tailored to the medium and the taste of the market.”
Purists worry about trend while sticking to tradition and shunning experimentation that dilutes the essence of art forms. While others cite the necessity to adapt and preserve classical and indigenous art forms in a globalising world that flattens cultural diversities, he said.

Congratulating the awardees, Ansari said these awards have played an essential role in preserving and carrying forward the multifarious expressions of our cultural identity.

Four eminent personalities were conferred the Akademi?s fellowships, while thirty-six artists and two scholars received the Akademi awards for 2010.

Akademi fellowship was conferred on vocalist Girija Devi, classical dancer Nataraja Ramakrishna, Dhrupad artist Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar, and mridangam artist T K Murthy. PTI AD

(Source: 07/23/2011 – MSN News (India))

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Vice President Confers Sangeet Natak Akademi Fellowships and Akademi Awards 2010

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 22, 2011

– Release ID :73434 –

The Vice-President of India Shri M. Hamid Ansari conferred the prestigious “Sangeet Natak Akademi Fellowships and Akademi Awards for 2010” at a special investiture ceremony here today. Addressing on the occasion  Shri Ansari said that the challenge is to be able to go beyond the dictates of what can loosely be termed “the market”. The form, format and grammar of art itself is sought to be tailored to the medium and the taste of the market. On the one hand, purists worry about this trend, sticking to tradition and shunning experimentation that dilutes the essence of the art from. Others cite the necessity to adapt and preserve classical and indigenous art forms in a globalizing world that flattens cultural diversities. No one has the perfect answer. Probably, there is no perfect answer. Yet, we must continue our effort to preserve that which makes us Indian – to be able to enjoy Indian art, sing, dance and play music as our ancestors did!

Congratulating the awardees the Vice President said that those honoured by it represent the nation’s highest achievers in music, dance and drama. These awards have thus played an essential role in preserving and carrying forward the multifarious expressions of our splendid cultural identity.

Four eminent personalities were conferred the Akademi’s Fellowships, while thirty-six artists and two scholars received the Akademi Awards for 2010. The highest honour of Akademi Fellowship (Akademi Ratna Sadasyata) was  conferred on eminent vocalist Girija Devi, renowned dance guru Nataraja Ramakrishna, Dhrupad maestro Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar, and Mridangam vidwan T. K. Murthy.  They received purse money of Rupees three lakh, besides an angavastram and a tamrapatra. The Fellowship of the Akademi is a rare honour, which is bestowed on a very limited number of artists and scholars at a given time.  The eminent representatives of music, dance and theatre honoured with the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award for 2010 received purse money of Rupees one lakh, an angavastram and tamrapatra.

The Akademi Fellowship (Akademi Ratna Sadasyata) and Akademi Award (Akademi Puraskar) are the most coveted national honours conferred on performing artists, gurus and scholars of the performing arts. These honours are decided by the Akademi’s General Council, the apex body consisting of eminent artists, scholars and nominees of the Government of India and of different States and Union Territories of the country. Sangeet Natak Akademi, established by the Government of India on 31 May 1952, is the National Academy of Music, Dance and Drama.

Following is the text of the Vice President’s address :

“I am happy to participate in today’s investiture ceremony of the Sangeet Natak Akademi Fellowships and Awards for the year 2010. It is a singular honour to be in the midst of such distinguished artists.

I felicitate all the winners of the Sangeet Natak Akademi Awards. I would like to specially mention those who have been honoured with the Akademi Fellowship –Dance Guru Late Shri Nataraj Ramakrishna, and the musicians Smt. Girija Devi, Shri Rahim Fahimuddin Dagar and Shri T. K. Murthy.

The Sangeet Natak Akademy, as the apex body in the country for undertaking the preservation and promotion of our performing arts, has for almost six decades carried out its mandate with diligence and perseverance. Those honoured by it represent the nation’s highest achievers in music, dance and drama. These awards have thus played an essential role in preserving and carrying forward the multifarious expressions of our splendid cultural identity.

Inaugurating the Sangeet Natak Akademy in January 1953, our first Education Minister Maulana Azad had emphasized the need to cherish and develop our precious heritage of dance, drama and music, not only for our own sake “but also as our contribution to the cultural heritage of mankind”. This is all the more necessary in an era of great change and, in a very real sense, becomes the duty of every citizen.

Classical and folk performing arts touch the core of our identity. It is for this reason that we should appreciate the effort of the Sangeet Natak Akademi to encourage talent in music, dance and drama, preserving the arts and propagating it.

We must also ponder how to popularize each of the fields of classical and folk music, dance and drama at the level of the mass media and common people. Technology has enabled quicker and cheaper dissemination of products of performing arts, including in digital format, among a diverse and dispersed audience.

The challenge is to be able to go beyond the dictates of what can loosely be termed “the market”. The form, format and grammar of art itself is sought to be tailored to the medium and the taste of the market. On the one hand, purists worry about this trend, sticking to tradition and shunning experimentation that dilutes the essence of the art from. Others cite the necessity to adapt and preserve classical and indigenous art forms in a globalizing world that flattens cultural diversities.

No one has the perfect answer. Probably, there is no perfect answer. Yet, we must continue our effort to preserve that which makes us Indian – to be able to enjoy Indian art, sing, dance and play music as our ancestors did!

I take this opportunity to once again congratulate the award winners and those conferred with the fellowships. You stand as role models to our youth to imbibe the art and craft and achieve perfection in your chosen fields. I thank Smt. Leela Samson for inviting me to today’s function and wish the Sangeet Natak Akademi all success in its endeavours.”

SK

(Source: 22-July, 2011 20:12 IST | Vice President’s Secretariat – Press Information Bureau, Government of India)

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Tribute: A masterly musician – Chingleput Ranganathan, was a perfectionist (The Hindu / ….

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 22, 2011

Chingleput Ranganathan (@ Facebook page)

Chingleput Ranganathan (@ Facebook page)

The Hindu: Today’s Paper » FEATURES » FRIDAY REVIEW

by S. Sivakumar

Tribute A pallavi exponent, Chingleput Ranganathan, was a perfectionist.

Sangeetha Kala Acharya and Kala Rathna, Chingleput Ranganathan, hailed by many as a laya-loyalist of exacting standards, passed away on July 12. He is survived by his wife and two sons, who are performing flautists.

He was the serving Principal of the Teacher’s College of Music at the Music Academy and was a hard task master. He was open to new ideas and was sought after by vidwans.

His connection withmusic began with his mother Rajalakshmi and H. Ramachandra Sastri, the flautist, who directed him to the Alathur School to continue his learning. His vehicle was his bicycle and he wore only white.

The pallavi may have been his forte, but he was much more than a mere rhythm master. He was a “Paripoorna Vidwan,” a multi-faceted genius who had composed about 50 tillanas, set to tune about 150 Tiruppugazh hymns and also musically embellished Tiruppugazh by presenting it as a 72 Melakarta novelty.

Ranganathan held aloft the Alathur tradition and guru-bhakti dominated his thought, word and deed. Paying him tribute, musicians and scholars emphasise his principles and musical upbringing.

T. R. Subramaniam : He was agood-natured person who never had ill-will towards anybody. He had mastered many complicated pallavis and freely shared them with whoever sought to learn them. Also he had learnt to sing Tiruppugazh using rare talas.

He learnt music the tough way, going through the rigours of Gurukulavasam. But for all the contribution he made, he did not get what he deserved.

P. S. Narayanaswami : He was my dearest friend for 55 years and it is an irreparable loss to me and to the music world. He knew many rare kritis, which he could sing beautifully and his expertise in pallavi is, of course, well known.

A man of great dignity he did not covet kutcheri opportunities, his service to All India Radio (AIR) and thus to rasikas, was immense.

J. Venkatraman : Mere words cannot express my grief. He was my affectionate brother and I have seen him work hard to acquire a high level of scholarship.

A committed teacher, his voice became a casualty in the bargain. But he never worried about concert chances and the money attached.

Not only did we do Gurukulavasam together, but also performed at a few places. It was an enriching experience. Rivalry never entered the picture. I believe in karma and Ranganathan has no rebirth. If it happens he will be born as a genius.

N. Narasimhan : Though he belonged to the Alathur school, Ranganathan developed his own pattern and style. Even simple nadai pallavis were a speciality with him.

He respected everyone irrespective of their age. We were colleagues at AIR, and he was put in charge of the Tamil section where he made a mark with his simple and delicate tunes for many pasurams, his teaching method and disciplined approach. Seetha Narayanan : As an Aasan he opened my eyes to the world of niraval, a delicate affair of art and craft and he showed how laya was an integral part of tanam.

He would sing with ease multi-kalai nadai/tala pallavis, that would begin after 1/8th of the even level (samam), and he would teach them too. He also made me understand the range and depth of pallavis and the unwavering concentration required to execute them perfectly. He was a purist and did not believe in improvisation of sangatis.

Generous and open in praise, he would point out errors politely in privacy.

An eclectic, he once had listened to N. Rajam‘s Bagesri on the violin and was so impressed that he incorporated many of the usages in one of his own compositions.

R. Vedavalli : We received the AIR award in 1955 together and he became a friend ever since. His genius was commended but never recognised. He was excellent at Sandha Tala Tiruppugazh and incorporated these in his pallavis.

He followed the order with sangatis and never missed the nuances as he learnt them from the Alathur Brothers. And he would not give up until his disciples got them right. He therefore, stuck to certain core values. A great and noble soul!

Alathur Thiagarajan, son of one of the Alathur Brothers (Subramaniam): A perfect example of one who learnt under the ideal Gurukula system, he served three masters – Alathur Venkatesa Iyer and the Alathur brothers, a feat that could easily classify Ranganathan as an extraordinary man.

His delectable grammatical nuances for Nayaki and his unmixed treatment of Bhairavi or Mukhari, for example had to be heard to be believed.

His laya command and its labyrinthine structures made accompanists wary of sitting next to him on stage.

He had the privilege of learning from Alathur Venkatesa Iyer (my grandfather) from 1956 to 1958. ‘Kuttipayya,’ as Ranganathan was fondly called, had unsurpassed knowledge, calibre and capacity.

His worry, as he taught, was that the student could not adhere strictly to the Alathur style. He had exceptional capacity for sangatis and calculations. He was a true devotee of Tyagaraja and was present at the Tiruvaiyaru Aradhana every year.

(Source: 07/2011 – The Hindu | Today’s Paper » FEATURES » FRIDAY REVIEW )

 

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Moderation Script (07/2011): Manodharma… Improvisation with(out) Rhythm – 4 Types in South Indian Classics

Posted by ElJay Arem (IMC OnAir) on July 18, 2011

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